Special Issue "Exploiting the Rice Germplasm for Health-Promoting and Value-Added Foods"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutraceuticals and Functional Foods".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2022 | Viewed by 2671

Special Issue Editors

Dr. John C Beaulieu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Food Processing and Sensory Quality Research, Southern Regional Research Center, USDA ARS, New Orleans, LA 70124, USA
Interests: rice; amino acids; protein; phenolics; functional beverages; green technology; microgreens; value-added
Dr. Ming Hsuan Chen
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
USDA ARS Dale Bumpers National Rice Research Center, 2890 Highway 130 E, Stuttgart, AR 72160, USA
Interests: rice grain quality; phytochemicals; resistant starch
Dr. Ida Wenefrida
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Rice Research Station, Louisiana State University AgCenter, 1373 Caffey Rd., Rayne, LA 70578, USA
Interests: rice; cereal chemistry; high-protein rice; mutational breeding; biotechnology
Dr. Piebiep Goufo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre for the Research and Technology of Agro-Environmental and Biological Sciences—CITAB, University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, Vila Real, Portugal
Interests: phytochemicals; regulation of crop growth (cereals, legume grains and grapevine); induced resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses; integrated disease management; sustainable use of agricultural chemicals and biologicals; sustainable agriculture practices

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Rice feeds approximately half the world’s population and is the main food crop in developing nations. However, the majority of rice consumed is white rice, which is not nutritionally dense and considered a starchy food source. Whole grain brown, red, purple, and black rice is superior to white rice since most nutrients such as oils, fatty acids, proteins, vitamins, micronutrients, and antioxidants are retained in the germ and bran. These constituents deliver numerous health-promoting nutritional benefits to the consumer. Rice bran also contains high amounts of fiber and bioactive phytochemicals, such as tocopherols, tocotrienols, oryzanols, vitamin B complex, phytosterols, carotenoids, and phenolic compounds. Oryza sativa was the first crop plant to be fully sequenced; it has over 3000 re-sequenced varieties and the largest single-species publicly available germplasm collection in the world. This immense genetic diversity lends to numerous varieties with different morphological, physical, and physichochemical characteristics and associated value-added food applications. Other rice types (e.g., Oryza glaberrima) also have unique and underutilized bran components worthy of value-added development. Within this Special Issue, the goal is to highlight genetic approaches and/or value-added mechanisms currently being explored, including agricultural practices, climate change considerations, and processing, to open up the possibility for exploiting the endogenous health-beneficial characteristics of the tremendously important and underutilized whole brown, red, purple, and black rice crops.

Dr. John C Beaulieu
Dr. Ming Hsuan Chen
Dr. Ida Wenefrida
Dr. Piebiep Goufo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • breeding
  • cereal chemistry
  • functional beverages
  • functional beverages
  • germination
  • lipids
  • phenolics
  • phytochemicals
  • processing
  • protein
  • value-added

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Possibility for Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Dementia Using Three Kinds of Brown Rice Blends after High-Pressure Treatment
Foods 2022, 11(6), 818; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11060818 - 12 Mar 2022
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Abstract
As it has been reported that type 2 diabetes mellitus increases the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, we investigated how to prevent type 2 diabetes and dementia using biofunctional boiled rice. We adopted unpolished super-hard rice (SHBR) for diabetes and wax-free unpolished black rice [...] Read more.
As it has been reported that type 2 diabetes mellitus increases the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, we investigated how to prevent type 2 diabetes and dementia using biofunctional boiled rice. We adopted unpolished super-hard rice (SHBR) for diabetes and wax-free unpolished black rice (WFBBR) for dementia and blended those with ordinary non-polished rice (KBR) (blending ratio 4:4:2), adding 2.5% waxy black rice bran (WBB) and 0.3% rice oil after high-pressure treatment (HPT) (WFBSK) to improve its palatability. This boiled rice is rich in dietary fiber, anthocyanin, free ferulic acid and β-secretase inhibitory activity. A randomized, parallel-group comparison study was conducted for 12 weeks with 24 subjects, using Cognitrax to evaluate their cognitive function primarily. Furthermore, as the secondary purpose, we performed a single-dose test for postprandial blood glucose and insulin secretion at the end of the human intervention test. After 12 weeks, consumers of the WFBSK rice exhibited significant improvement in language memory by cognitive test battery compared with those who consumed the control white rice (p < 0.05). Moreover, subjects who consumed the WFBSK rice had lower insulin secretion levels than those who consumed the control polished rice (p < 0.05). Full article
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Article
Lipid Profiles in Preliminary Germinated Brown Rice Beverages Compared to Non-Germinated Brown and White Rice Beverages
Foods 2022, 11(2), 220; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11020220 - 14 Jan 2022
Viewed by 457
Abstract
Brown rice is nutritionally superior to white rice, yet oil rancidity can be problematic during processing and storage regarding sensory attributes. Germinating brown rice is known to generally increase some health-promoting compounds. In response to increasing the consumption of plant-based beverages, we sprouted [...] Read more.
Brown rice is nutritionally superior to white rice, yet oil rancidity can be problematic during processing and storage regarding sensory attributes. Germinating brown rice is known to generally increase some health-promoting compounds. In response to increasing the consumption of plant-based beverages, we sprouted unstabilized brown rice, using green technologies and saccharification enzymes for value-added beverages. ‘Rondo’ paddy rice was dehulled, sorted and germinated, and beverages were produced and compared against non-germinated brown and white brewers rice beverages. The preliminary germinated brown rice beverage contained significantly higher concentrations of total lipids, diacylglycerols, triacylglycerols, free sterols, phytosterol esters and oryzanols than both non-germinated brown and white rice beverages. White rice beverages had significantly higher free fatty acids. Significant lipid losses occurred during sieving, yet novel germinated brown rice beverages contained appreciable levels of valuable health-beneficial lipids, which appeared to form natural emulsions. Further pilot plant investigations should be scaled-up for pasteurization and adjusted through emulsification to ameliorate sieving losses. Full article
Article
The Effect of Rice vs. Wheat Ingestion on Postprandial Gastroesophageal Reflux (GER) Symptoms in Patients with Overlapping GERD-Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)
Foods 2022, 11(1), 26; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11010026 - 23 Dec 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1028
Abstract
A randomized crossover study in twenty-one patients (18F, age 50 ± 13 years) with overlapping GERD-IBS was conducted to evaluate the effects of rice noodles (low FODMAPs) vs. wheat noodles (high FODMAPs) on typical GER symptoms, and the correlation between GERD symptoms and [...] Read more.
A randomized crossover study in twenty-one patients (18F, age 50 ± 13 years) with overlapping GERD-IBS was conducted to evaluate the effects of rice noodles (low FODMAPs) vs. wheat noodles (high FODMAPs) on typical GER symptoms, and the correlation between GERD symptoms and intestinal gas production. Results: Heartburn and regurgitation scores were highest in most patients (19/21) during the first 15 min after meals. At 15 min after lunch, wheat was significantly associated with more regurgitation and heartburn than rice. Also, at 15 min after breakfast, wheat aggravated more regurgitation than rice. Wheat ingestion was significantly associated with higher H2 and CH4 levels after lunch compared to rice, whereas gas levels before lunch were similar (p > 0.05). The area under the curve of H2 and CH4 concentration 15 min after a lunch of wheat moderately correlated with the regurgitation severity at 15-min (r = 0.56, p < 0.05). Conclusion: Wheat induced more GERD symptoms than rice in patients with overlapping GERD-IBS. This effect, immediately developed after lunch, was associated with more intestinal gas production. Thus, a low FODMAPs diet may relieve postprandial GERD symptoms in GERD patients with overlapping IBS. Wheat inducing more regurgitation than rice after breakfast suggests other mechanism(s) besides gut fermentation. Full article
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