Special Issue "Research on Influencing Factors of Food Choice and Food Consumption"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Sensory and Consumer Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 January 2022) | Viewed by 18838

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Maggie Geuens
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Marketing, Innovation and Organisation, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Tweekerkenstraat 2, 9000 Ghent, Belgium
Interests: food; health; decision making; branding; marketing communications

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Current food environments allow consumers to eat whatever and whenever they want. As a consequence, many consumers struggle to resist the temptation of palatable food and eat more and more often than they should, resulting in huge overweight and obesity figures worldwide. Consumers’ food choice and food consumption (intentions) are driven by a multitude of factors. Four important categories of determinants are: (1) personal factors, referring to, for example, food knowledge, cooking skills, lifestyle, goals and self-control; (2) social factors such as parental style, household eating habits, impact of social media and influencers; (3) product-related factors including product attributes, packaging, labels, pricing, branding, and communication-related aspects; and (4) situational factors involving (healthy) food availability, time pressure, store design, food apps and games, and in-store behavioral interventions (nudging).

This Special Issue of Foods invites scholars to submit manuscripts related to individual, social, product-related and/or situational drivers (facilitators or inhibitors) of food choice and food consumption (intentions) that expands our knowledge in the field of healthy eating behavior. We welcome original research papers as well as reviews and meta-analyses with a focus on food choice (intentions) and food behavior (intentions).

Prof. Dr. Maggie Geuens
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • food choice
  • food choice intentions
  • food behavior
  • food behavior intentions
  • food drivers
  • food inhibitors
  • healthy food
  • personal factors
  • social factors
  • product factors
  • situational factors
  • in-store marketing
  • behavioral interventions

Published Papers (17 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Consumer Preference for Food Bundles under Cognitive Load: A Grocery Shopping Experiment
Foods 2022, 11(7), 973; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11070973 - 27 Mar 2022
Viewed by 442
Abstract
Product bundling is a common retail marketing strategy. The bundling of food items has the potential to increase profits in the grocery sector, particularly for fresh produce, which often has lower profit margins. Although prior work suggests consumers prefer bundles because they require [...] Read more.
Product bundling is a common retail marketing strategy. The bundling of food items has the potential to increase profits in the grocery sector, particularly for fresh produce, which often has lower profit margins. Although prior work suggests consumers prefer bundles because they require less cognitive effort to select, no study has yet experimentally manipulated cognitive load when food bundles are included in the choice set. To test whether bundle preference differs when cognitive resources are constrained, a grocery shopping experiment was conducted with 250 consumers in the midwestern U.S., in a laboratory that featured a grocery store display. Consumers who grocery shopped under cognitive load had a higher odds of selecting a food bundle even when the bundle did not offer a price discount. Results suggest food bundles may be preferred because they require less cognitive effort to process, which could benefit consumers by simplifying the grocery shopping experience. Additional factors found to influence food bundle selection included whether the bundled items were perceived as being complementary and hunger levels. Food bundles could help lessen cognitive effort associated with grocery shopping and may especially appeal to those who do not enjoy food shopping. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Influencing Factors of Food Choice and Food Consumption)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Meating Conflict: Toward a Model of Ambivalence-Motivated Reduction of Meat Consumption
Foods 2022, 11(7), 921; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11070921 - 23 Mar 2022
Viewed by 781
Abstract
An increasing number of people are concerned about eating meat, despite enjoying doing so. In the present research, we examined whether the desire to resolve this ambivalence about eating meat leads to a reduction in meat consumption. Our model of ambivalence-motivated meat reduction [...] Read more.
An increasing number of people are concerned about eating meat, despite enjoying doing so. In the present research, we examined whether the desire to resolve this ambivalence about eating meat leads to a reduction in meat consumption. Our model of ambivalence-motivated meat reduction proposes that the pervasive nature of evaluative conflict motivates meat avoidance, and we highlight two potential mechanisms involved: the anticipation of ambivalence reduction through behavioral change, and information seeking for contents that facilitate meat reduction. Study 1 drew on a cross-sectional 6-day food diary with 7485 observations in a quota sample to investigate why meat-related ambivalence arises and to demonstrate the correlation of ambivalence with meat reduction. Two experiments investigated the causal direction of this association by showing that ambivalence-induced discomfort motivated participants to eat less meat when they introspected on their preexisting incongruent evaluations (Study 2 and 3), which was mediated by the aforementioned mechanisms involved (Study 3; preregistered). The studies utilized diverse samples from Germany, England, and the US (total N = 1192) and support the proposed model by indicating that behavioral change is an important coping strategy to resolve ambivalent discomfort in the context of meat consumption. Our model of ambivalence-motivated meat reduction contributes to theorizing on the consequences of ambivalence and the psychology of (not) eating meat. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Influencing Factors of Food Choice and Food Consumption)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Willingness to Pay for Food Labelling Schemes in Vietnam: A Choice Experiment on Water Spinach
Foods 2022, 11(5), 722; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11050722 - 28 Feb 2022
Viewed by 968
Abstract
The growing concern for food safety and quality motivates governments and private sectors to improve consumers’ confidence in food systems, such as through adopting certifications and traceability systems. The recent emergence of diverse food labelling schemes and the turbulence in food systems in [...] Read more.
The growing concern for food safety and quality motivates governments and private sectors to improve consumers’ confidence in food systems, such as through adopting certifications and traceability systems. The recent emergence of diverse food labelling schemes and the turbulence in food systems in emerging countries have sparked questions about consumers’ valuation of such labels. Nonetheless, little is known on how the familiarity with, trust in and knowledge of these food labelling schemes affect consumers’ willingness to pay for labelling schemes in emerging market contexts. This study aims to address these literature gaps by investigating consumers’ valuation of existing certifications, branding and traceability labelling schemes in Vietnam. A face-to-face survey was conducted, including a discrete choice experiment on water spinach in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The findings indicated that Vietnamese consumers are generally willing to pay price premia for food labelling schemes, such as VietGAP certification, EU and USDA organic certifications, private branding and traceable Quick Response (QR) coding. While familiarity and understanding had no significant impact on Vietnamese consumers’ valuation, trust was found to be a critical factor shaping willingness to pay for products bearing VietGAP label. Policy implications and marketing strategies for organic certifications and traceability schemes in Vietnam are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Influencing Factors of Food Choice and Food Consumption)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Rural Ties and Consumption of Rural Provenance Food Products—Evidence from the Customers of Urban Specialty Stores in Portugal
Foods 2022, 11(4), 547; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11040547 - 15 Feb 2022
Viewed by 526
Abstract
Consumers’ food preferences increasingly meet concerns of authenticity, health, origin, and sustainability, altogether attributes embodied in rural provenance food products. The dynamics of production, commercialization, and availability of these products in urban centers are growing stronger. This study aims to explore rural provenance [...] Read more.
Consumers’ food preferences increasingly meet concerns of authenticity, health, origin, and sustainability, altogether attributes embodied in rural provenance food products. The dynamics of production, commercialization, and availability of these products in urban centers are growing stronger. This study aims to explore rural provenance food consumption and underlying motivations, the consumers’ images of products and provenance areas, and the influence of rural ties in consumption. Data from a survey directed to 1554 consumers of 24 urban specialty stores located in three Portuguese cities were analyzed. The analysis is based on the differences between frequent and sporadic consumers of Portuguese rural provenance food products. The two groups significantly differ in the reasons provided to acquire the products. Those who buy and consume these products more frequently especially value sensorial features, convenience, national provenance, and the impacts on rural development. Additionally, the motivations to choose rural provenance foods tend to pair with positive images of those products and of their territories of origin. This is intrinsically connected with familiarity, a nuclear notion that encompasses the symbolic images of the products and their origins as actual connections (familiar and otherwise) to rural contexts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Influencing Factors of Food Choice and Food Consumption)
Article
Influencing Factors for Sustainable Dietary Transformation—A Case Study of German Food Consumption
Foods 2022, 11(2), 227; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11020227 - 15 Jan 2022
Viewed by 863
Abstract
In a case study of Germany, we examine current food consumption along the three pillars of sustainability to evaluate external factors that influence consumers’ dietary decisions. We investigate to what extent diets meet nutritional requirements (social factor), the diets’ environmental impact (ecological factor), [...] Read more.
In a case study of Germany, we examine current food consumption along the three pillars of sustainability to evaluate external factors that influence consumers’ dietary decisions. We investigate to what extent diets meet nutritional requirements (social factor), the diets’ environmental impact (ecological factor), and the food prices’ influence on purchasing behavior (economic factor). For this, we compare two dietary recommendations (plant-based, omnivorous) with the status quo, and we examine different consumption styles (conventional, organic produce). Additionally, we evaluate 1446 prices of food items from three store types (organic store, supermarket, and discounter). With this, we are able to evaluate and compare 30 different food baskets along their health, environmental, and economic impact. Results show that purchasing decisions are only slightly influenced by health-related factors. Furthermore, few consumers align their diet with low environmental impact. In contrast, a large share of consumers opt for cheap foods, regardless of health and environmental consequences. We find that price is, arguably, the main factor in food choices from a sustainability standpoint. Action should be taken by policy makers to financially incentivize consumers in favor of healthy and environmentally friendly diets. Otherwise, the status quo further drives especially underprivileged consumers towards unhealthy and environmentally damaging consumption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Influencing Factors of Food Choice and Food Consumption)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Music Is Served: How Acoustic Interventions in Hospital Dining Environments Can Improve Patient Mealtime Wellbeing
Foods 2021, 10(11), 2590; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10112590 - 26 Oct 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1271
Abstract
Eating-related challenges and discomforts arising from moderately acquired brain injuries (ABI)—including physiological and cognitive difficulties—can interfere with patients’ eating experience and impede the recovery process. At the same time, external environmental factors have been proven to be influential in our mealtime experience. This [...] Read more.
Eating-related challenges and discomforts arising from moderately acquired brain injuries (ABI)—including physiological and cognitive difficulties—can interfere with patients’ eating experience and impede the recovery process. At the same time, external environmental factors have been proven to be influential in our mealtime experience. This experimental pilot study investigates whether redesigning the sonic environment in hospital dining areas can positively influence ABI patients’ (n = 17) nutritional state and mealtime experience. Using a three-phase between-subjects interventional design, we investigate the effects of installing sound proofing materials and playing music during the lunch meals at a specialised ABI hospital unit. Comprising both quantitative and qualitative research approaches and data acquisition methods, this project provides multidisciplinary and holistic insights into the importance of attending to sound in hospital surroundings. Our results demonstrate that improved acoustics and music playback during lunch meals might improve the mealtime atmosphere, the patient well-being, and social interaction, which potentially supports patient food intake and nutritional state. The results are discussed in terms of potential future implications for the healthcare sector. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Influencing Factors of Food Choice and Food Consumption)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
‘Don’t Worry, Honey: It’s Cooked’: Addressing Food Risk during Pregnancy on Facebook Italian Posts
Foods 2021, 10(10), 2484; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10102484 - 17 Oct 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 713
Abstract
During pregnancy, women exposed to microbiological risks are more susceptible to contracting specific pathogens, which can lead to serious diseases both in the mother and the foetus. Food-borne diseases can be avoided to a large extent by following good practices of food manipulation [...] Read more.
During pregnancy, women exposed to microbiological risks are more susceptible to contracting specific pathogens, which can lead to serious diseases both in the mother and the foetus. Food-borne diseases can be avoided to a large extent by following good practices of food manipulation and cooking. Safe eating behaviours are influenced by knowledge and perception of food risks and are constructed, among others, online. Pregnant women often use Web 2.0 to obtain and share pregnancy-related information as a strategy of collective coping with emotions through conversations. This paper explores how knowledge and perceptions of food risks during pregnancy are shared among users on Italian Facebook pages and groups. The corpus, including 648,399 items (i.e., posts), was analysed: (a) first, by means of the Reinert method, to verify to what extent issues concerning food risks are debated; and (b) second, through a manual content analysis, to observe how food risks are addressed in terms of contents and social sharing of emotions. The main results show that food risk is not among the most discussed topics, and the least known and debated food risks are the most widespread (e.g., campylobacteriosis). Sometimes, food risks, when addressed, were minimised or denied, and the belief to be ‘less at risk’ than peers for such risk (i.e., optimistic bias) was observed. The results underline the importance, for health institutions, of building a tailored communication strategy on food risks during pregnancy to promote correct food behaviours by exploiting social networks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Influencing Factors of Food Choice and Food Consumption)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Relationship between Acceptance of Insects as an Alternative to Meat and Willingness to Consume Insect-Based Food—A Study on a Representative Sample of the Polish Population
Foods 2021, 10(10), 2420; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10102420 - 13 Oct 2021
Viewed by 945
Abstract
Despite their nutritional and ecological potential, insect-based food is rarely accepted by consumers. There may be a discrepancy between the consumers’ understanding of the need to reduce meat consumption and their personal food preferences. Our goal was to investigate the relationship between the [...] Read more.
Despite their nutritional and ecological potential, insect-based food is rarely accepted by consumers. There may be a discrepancy between the consumers’ understanding of the need to reduce meat consumption and their personal food preferences. Our goal was to investigate the relationship between the acceptance of insects as a meat substitute, the willingness to buy and consume insect-based food, and the underlying factors. The study was conducted on a representative sample of the Polish population, and as in previous studies, our results showed that men who are more familiar with entomophagy pay more attention to the environmental impact of their food choices, are convenience-orientated and are more willing to accept insects as a meat substitute. However, people with higher levels of food neophobia and disgust sensitivity and lower levels of variety-seeking tendency are less willing to consume insects. Our study showed that the acceptance of insects as an alternative to meat (general perspective) does not translate into a willingness to buy and eat them (individual perspective). Consumers who declare their acceptance of insects as a meat substitute might not be willing to purchase insects for their consumption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Influencing Factors of Food Choice and Food Consumption)
Article
Ecology or Health—How to Successfully Promote Palm Oil Free Products: A Comparison between Spain and Poland
Foods 2021, 10(10), 2380; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10102380 - 08 Oct 2021
Viewed by 472
Abstract
Palm oil, widely used in the food industry, is causing some concern due to its negative impact on the environment and human health. The goal of the conducted research was to answer the question of what would be a better strategy for the [...] Read more.
Palm oil, widely used in the food industry, is causing some concern due to its negative impact on the environment and human health. The goal of the conducted research was to answer the question of what would be a better strategy for the marketing communication of palm oil substitutes, its health benefits or its environmental friendliness? This article presents a research project exploring the potential of chocolate bread spread based on a saturated fat and palm oil substitute. The research was conducted on two samples of Spanish (n = 675) and Polish (n = 661) bread spread consumers. In the experimental study, consumers were presented with a description of a new chocolate spread entering the market, with references to (a) its health benefits or (b) its environmental benefits resulting from the absence of palm oil in the product. The results showed that ecology references in food-related marketing communication in Spain have a stronger influence on the consumer decision-making process than health references. In Poland, the effect of communication was moderated by an evaluation of a person’s eating style and the individual level of eco-friendly behavior of the consumer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Influencing Factors of Food Choice and Food Consumption)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
The Impact of Responsible Food Packaging Perceptions on Naturalness and Healthiness Inferences, and Consumer Buying Intentions
Foods 2021, 10(10), 2366; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10102366 - 05 Oct 2021
Viewed by 700
Abstract
The research presented in this article examines the relationship between consumer perceptions that a food package is responsible (sustainable) and consumers’ intention to purchase the product that it contains. On the basis of the relevant literature, a conceptual model is proposed where this [...] Read more.
The research presented in this article examines the relationship between consumer perceptions that a food package is responsible (sustainable) and consumers’ intention to purchase the product that it contains. On the basis of the relevant literature, a conceptual model is proposed where this relationship is hypothesized to be mediated by two variables: the product’s perceived naturalness and healthiness. A first study was conducted with the objective of developing a scale with good psychometric properties to measure the perceived naturalness of a food product. The objective of the second study was to test the validity of the two-mediator conceptual model. The results show that the extent to which a food product package is seen as responsible (i.e., recyclable, reusable, compostable) has a positive and statistically significant impact on consumers’ intention to buy it, and that it is through the sequential mediation of the product’s perceived naturalness and healthiness that this relationship unfolds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Influencing Factors of Food Choice and Food Consumption)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Food on the Move: The Impact of Implied Motion in Pictures on Food Perceptions through Anticipated Pleasure of Consumption
Foods 2021, 10(9), 2194; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10092194 - 16 Sep 2021
Viewed by 803
Abstract
To tackle obesity, upgrading the image of healthy food is increasingly relevant. Rather than focusing on long-term benefits, an effective way to promote healthy food consumption through visual advertising is to increase its pleasure perception. We investigate whether implied motion, a popular trend [...] Read more.
To tackle obesity, upgrading the image of healthy food is increasingly relevant. Rather than focusing on long-term benefits, an effective way to promote healthy food consumption through visual advertising is to increase its pleasure perception. We investigate whether implied motion, a popular trend in food pictures, affects food perceptions through anticipated consumption pleasure. Prior research shows that motion affects food perceptions, but these studies focused on limited food categories, using experiments with a single food stimulus, and mainly showing unhealthy food effects. Therefore, we aim to (1) replicate prior findings on the effects of food in motion on appeal, tastiness, healthiness, and freshness perceptions; (2) examine whether these effects differ for healthy and unhealthy food; and (3) investigate whether anticipated pleasure of consumption drives the effects of implied motion on food perceptions. Three between-subjects experiments (N = 626) reveal no evidence for the effectiveness of motion (vs. no motion) across a large variety of food products. We further show no differential effects for healthy versus unhealthy foods. Moreover, implied motion does not increase appeal or taste perceptions through anticipated pleasure. Considering the current replication crisis, these findings provide more nuanced insights into the effectiveness of motion in visual food advertising. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Influencing Factors of Food Choice and Food Consumption)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Animals Like Us: Leveraging the Negativity Bias in Anthropomorphism to Reduce Beef Consumption
Foods 2021, 10(9), 2147; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10092147 - 10 Sep 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 893
Abstract
Our current work contributes to the literature of meat consumption reduction. Capitalizing on the inherent humanizing characteristic of anthropomorphism coupled with leveraging negativity bias, we created a novel approach to reduce meat-eating intention. Using on-pack product stickers, we compare an anthropomorphic message stressing [...] Read more.
Our current work contributes to the literature of meat consumption reduction. Capitalizing on the inherent humanizing characteristic of anthropomorphism coupled with leveraging negativity bias, we created a novel approach to reduce meat-eating intention. Using on-pack product stickers, we compare an anthropomorphic message stressing the capacity to experience pain with two other anthropomorphic messages that have been used before in the literature (intelligence and pro-social behavior of animals). We find that an on-pack pain anthropomorphic sticker reduces purchase intentions of the meat product and intention to consume meat in general and is more effective than stickers displaying pro-social or intelligence messages. We also show that the pain message’s negative impact on purchase intention is serially mediated by anticipatory guilt and attitude towards meat. In addition, we show that the differential effectiveness of the anthropomorphic messages can be explained by the negativity bias. That is, when the pro-social and intelligence messages were formulated in a negative way (as is pain), all three messages were equally effective at reducing intention to purchase meat and increase intention to reduce meat consumption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Influencing Factors of Food Choice and Food Consumption)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Take a Bite! The Effect of Bitten Food in Pictures on Product Attitudes, Purchase Intentions, and Willingness to Pay
Foods 2021, 10(9), 2096; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10092096 - 04 Sep 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 824
Abstract
Food pictures in advertisements, on packages, and on social media often display food with a bite in it. We investigated the effect of pictures of food with a bite (vs. no bite) on product attitudes, purchase intentions, and willingness to pay. In two [...] Read more.
Food pictures in advertisements, on packages, and on social media often display food with a bite in it. We investigated the effect of pictures of food with a bite (vs. no bite) on product attitudes, purchase intentions, and willingness to pay. In two online experimental studies we tested this effect for both pictures without context, as well as pictures in an advertisement. We also investigated two theories that could lead to opposite effects: consumer contamination and embodied mental simulation. We found that a picture of food with a bite (vs. no bite) resulted in lower purchase intentions, and that this effect was mediated by disgust (i.e., consumer contamination). Furthermore, we found an interaction effect of picture type (i.e., bite vs. no bite) and context (i.e., no context vs. advertisement) on purchase intentions: the effect of picture type on purchase intentions was attenuated when the picture appeared in an advertisement (vs. when the picture is shown without context). We found similar effects on product attitudes and willingness to pay. Lastly, a picture of food with a bite (vs. no bite) had no effect on embodied mental simulation. Field practitioners are advised to take caution when using pictures of bitten food as this may lead to unfavorable consumer responses because of a feeling if disgust. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Influencing Factors of Food Choice and Food Consumption)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
Evaluating the Acceptance of Hemp Food in Australian Adults Using the Theory of Planned Behavior and Structural Equation Modelling
Foods 2021, 10(9), 2071; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10092071 - 02 Sep 2021
Viewed by 897
Abstract
This research presents a mixed methods (qual-QUANT) approach to the evaluation of the intention to consume hemp foods in an Australian sample soon after its legalization, using the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). Structural equation modeling was used to evaluate items developed from [...] Read more.
This research presents a mixed methods (qual-QUANT) approach to the evaluation of the intention to consume hemp foods in an Australian sample soon after its legalization, using the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). Structural equation modeling was used to evaluate items developed from semi-structured interviews, with a focus on the TPB factors; attitudes toward hemp food consumption, subjective beliefs, and perceptions of control. Findings support the notion that consumers may be confused about associations between Cannabidiol (CBD) oil, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and hemp food produced from Cannabis sativa. Highly salient negative associations are mediated by the perception of positive aspects of CBD for some consumers, but the value placed on others’ acceptance of hemp food is the greatest indicator of intention to consume hemp food products. It is suggested that greater education of consumers might allay fears borne of association of hemp food to either CBD or THC, and any move toward disassociation of hemp food to either entity would have positive repercussions for the hemp food industry. Findings have implications for other novel foods that carry highly salient negative associations for consumers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Influencing Factors of Food Choice and Food Consumption)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
How Individual Variations in the Perception of Basic Tastes and Astringency Relate with Dietary Intake and Preferences for Fruits and Vegetables
Foods 2021, 10(8), 1961; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10081961 - 23 Aug 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 877
Abstract
Background: Oral food perception plays a major role in food acceptance, although the way it relates with food preferences and final choices in adults is still debatable. The objective of the present study was to assess the relationship between gustatory function, dietary [...] Read more.
Background: Oral food perception plays a major role in food acceptance, although the way it relates with food preferences and final choices in adults is still debatable. The objective of the present study was to assess the relationship between gustatory function, dietary habits and fruit and vegetable preferences. Methods: Recognition thresholds, suprathreshold and hedonics were accessed for sweet, bitter, sour, salty and astringency in 291 adult participants. A Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and a questionnaire for assessment of preferences for individual fruit and vegetables were filled by the participants. Results: Three clusters were obtained: “most sensitive”, “less sensitive” and “less sensitive only for sour”. The less sensitive cluster showed lower preferences for fruit and vegetables and higher intake of sweets and fast foods, whereas higher preferences for sweet veggies were observed in the “most sensitive” cluster. Basic tastes and astringency hedonics did not associate with fruit and vegetable preferences, but the sensitivity for these oral sensations did. Conclusions: Taste and astringency sensitivities are related with the preference for fruit and vegetables, being also associated with some dietary habits. The effectiveness of the strategies to promote plant-based healthy food consumption may benefit from the knowledge of individuals’ gustatory function. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Influencing Factors of Food Choice and Food Consumption)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Determinants of Fast-Food Consumption in Romania: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior
Foods 2021, 10(8), 1877; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10081877 - 13 Aug 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1104
Abstract
This study explores drivers of fast-food consumption in Romania using the Theory of Planned Behavior. We analyze 532 responses to an online survey and use partial least squares path modeling to estimate the relationships between the intention to consume fast food and its [...] Read more.
This study explores drivers of fast-food consumption in Romania using the Theory of Planned Behavior. We analyze 532 responses to an online survey and use partial least squares path modeling to estimate the relationships between the intention to consume fast food and its possible determinants. Our results show that the most significant predictor is the subjective norms (injunctive norms: β = 0.218, p < 0.001; descriptive norms: β = 0.192, p < 0.001). Among the affective and cognitive attitudes, only the latter is statistically significant in predicting the intention (β = 0.088, p = 0.020), while perceived behavioral control is not significantly associated with intention toward fast-food consumption. We explain how our results can help policymakers to design better interventions on public health concerns about fast-food consumption and population obesity, especially children obesity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Influencing Factors of Food Choice and Food Consumption)

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
No Way, That’s Gross! How Public Exposure Therapy Can Overcome Disgust Preventing Consumer Adoption of Sustainable Food Alternatives
Foods 2021, 10(6), 1380; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10061380 - 15 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 920
Abstract
Two prominently discussed sustainable food alternatives—lab-meat and edible insects—elicit disgust among consumers, thereby preventing acceptance. While providing prospective consumers with more information on, for instance, the environmental benefits of lab-meat has shown some success in increasing consumer acceptance, we argue that the disgust [...] Read more.
Two prominently discussed sustainable food alternatives—lab-meat and edible insects—elicit disgust among consumers, thereby preventing acceptance. While providing prospective consumers with more information on, for instance, the environmental benefits of lab-meat has shown some success in increasing consumer acceptance, we argue that the disgust response—the main barrier to the societal acceptance of these foods—is not addressed. This is, we argue, because disgust is not the result of misperceptions (e.g., edible insects carry diseases) and thus unlikely to be overcome by information alone. Building on the latest insights into the social origins of disgust, this manuscript reviews an alternative strategy to foster the broader acceptance of sustainable food alternatives that currently elicit disgust. Specifically, we explain why and how public exposure could be a promising avenue for marketers to reduce consumers’ disgust response and thus increase the acceptance of sustainable food alternatives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Influencing Factors of Food Choice and Food Consumption)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop