Special Issue "Research and Development in Dairy Products"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Dairy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2023 | Viewed by 3618

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Nuno Alvarenga
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Technology and Innovation Unit, National Institute of Agrarian and Veterinary Research, I. P. (INIAV), Av. da República, Quinta do Marquês, 2780-157 Oeiras, Portugal
Interests: dairy science; food development; food quality; food texture and rheology
Prof. Dr. María G. Córdoba
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Food Quality and Microbiology, University Institute for the Research in Agrifood Resources-INURA, University of Extremadura, Badajoz, Spain
Interests: food safety; food microbiology; toxigenic molds; biocontrol; prevention research
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. António Pedro Louro Martins
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agrária e Veterinária, Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: quality of dairy products; cheese production; dairy industry
Prof. Dr. João Dias
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Agriculture, Polytechnic Institute of Beja, Rua Pedro Soares, 7800-295 Beja, Portugal
Interests: applied technology to dairy industry; food products development; computer vision; cheese ripening

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue aims to consider recent developments concerning the science and technology of milk and dairy products, with an impact on product development considering the most current drivers within the dairy sector. This Special Issue has a broad range of topics, and we welcome you to contribute submissions (including original research and current review articles) addressing milk or milk product composition and the effects of genetic factors as well as technology on the nutritional/functional properties of dairy products, energy consumption and sustainability. We are also interested in papers investigating new milk sources, the development of new products with nutritional added-value products and consumers acceptance. Further, we welcome recent developments in the detection of bioactive compounds naturally present in traditional products (mainly traditional cheeses) as natural elements contributing nutritional value.

Additional topics of interest for the Special Issue include, but are not limited to:

  • Recent evolutions of milk and milk product technology and processing, including packaging and market solutions;
  • Recent knowledge on nutritional attributes of traditional dairy products;
  • New solutions for dairy product sustainable processing;
  • New dairy product development and novel clean-label ingredients with nutritional added-value properties;
  • New technologies applied to the dairy sector including Internet of Things (IoT), cloud computing and machine learning.

Prof. Dr. Nuno Alvarenga
Prof. Dr. María G. Córdoba
Dr. António Pedro Louro Martins
Prof. Dr. João Dias
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • milk production 
  • genetics and milk quality improvement 
  • processing, packing and edible films 
  • traditional cheeses 
  • quality and safety 
  • microbiota and probiotics 
  • product development 
  • nutritional added value 
  • clean label 
  • circular economy

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Nutritional, Physicochemical, Microstructural, Rheological, and Organoleptical Characteristics of Ice Cream Incorporating Adansonia digitata Pulp Flour
Foods 2023, 12(3), 533; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12030533 - 25 Jan 2023
Viewed by 381
Abstract
Ice cream’s appeal is unrivaled. Nonmilk and milk ingredients in ice cream formulas affect their nutritional value, structure, and organoleptical qualities. Seeking novel dietary ingredients instead of artificial flavoring compounds is vital for improving ice cream taste preference, adding antioxidants, and increasing nutritional [...] Read more.
Ice cream’s appeal is unrivaled. Nonmilk and milk ingredients in ice cream formulas affect their nutritional value, structure, and organoleptical qualities. Seeking novel dietary ingredients instead of artificial flavoring compounds is vital for improving ice cream taste preference, adding antioxidants, and increasing nutritional value. The current study examines the feasibility of manufacturing a new flavored ice cream with excellent dietary value using Adansonia digitata L. (Baobab) fruit pulp (ADFP). The prepared ice cream’s physicochemical and microbiological quality, and rheological, microstructural, and organoleptic properties were investigated. Using ADFP instead of skim milk powder with a partial or complete replacement, five ice cream samples were produced and marked as IB-0, IB-25, IB-50, IB-75, and IB-100. Chemical characteristics were not noticeably impacted except protein and ash, which considerably decreased with increasing ADFP levels. Increasing ADFP in the samples increased titratable acidity and reduced pH. All ice cream samples were microbiologically acceptable with no pathogenic bacteria. By increasing ADFP in the samples, the daily values (%DV) of sodium, potassium, and magnesium were not considerably affected. Calcium reduced from 14.91% in IB-0 to 7.75% in IB-100. All microelements found in the study rose considerably as ADFP increased. Increasing ADFP levels significantly boosted antioxidant levels. The IB-100 sample had the highest total phenolic content (149.29 mg GAE 100 g−1), antioxidant activity (98.12 µmol of TE 100 g−1), total flavonoids (5.96 mg QE 100 g−1), and total flavanols (4.01 mg QE 100 g−1). The inclusion of ADFP had a beneficial effect on the color of the samples. It did not negatively affect the ice cream’s organoleptic acceptability as determined by organoleptic, rheological, and microstructural examinations. Interestingly, when skim milk powder was replaced with 50% and 75%, the hardness, viscosity, and aqueous phase separation were significantly improved. In conclusion, ADPF improves the nutritional value of ice cream and can be used as a natural coloring ingredient without affecting microstructural and rheological properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research and Development in Dairy Products)
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Article
Probiotic of Lactiplantibacillus plantarum NWAFU-BIO-BS29 Isolated from Chinese Traditional Fermented Milk and Its Potential Therapeutic Applications Based on Gut Microbiota Regulation
Foods 2022, 11(23), 3766; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11233766 - 23 Nov 2022
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Abstract
Lactic acid bacteria are one of the bioresources that can promote the host’s health and have potential therapeutic applications. This study aimed to evaluate the probiotic properties of novel Lactiplantibacillus plantarum NWAFU-BISO-BS29 isolated in vitro from traditional Chinese fermented milk, assess its safety, [...] Read more.
Lactic acid bacteria are one of the bioresources that can promote the host’s health and have potential therapeutic applications. This study aimed to evaluate the probiotic properties of novel Lactiplantibacillus plantarum NWAFU-BISO-BS29 isolated in vitro from traditional Chinese fermented milk, assess its safety, and study its interaction with the gut microbiota using a BALB/c mouse model. The findings reveal that this strain had a high tolerance to gastric acidity (64.4%) and bile salts (19.83–87.92%) with remarkable auto-aggregation and co-aggregation abilities (33.01–83.96%), respectively. Furthermore, it lowered the cholesterol levels in dead cells (44.02%) and live cells (34.95%) and produced short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Likewise, it showed good antioxidant properties and strong antipathogen activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus with inhibition zones at 21 and 25 mm, respectively. The safety assessment results indicate that all of the virulence factor genes were not detected in the whole DNA; additionally, no hemolysis or resistance to antibiotics commonly used in food and feed was observed. Interestingly, the 16S rRNA gene sequencing of the mouse gut microbiota showed a marked alteration in the microbial composition of the administrated group, with a noticeable increase in Firmicutes, Patescibacteria, Campylobacterota, Deferribacterota, Proteobacteria, and Cyanobacteria at the phylum level. The modulation of gut microbial diversity significantly improved the production of SCFCs due to the abundance of lactobacillus genera, which was consistent with the functional gene predictive analysis and is believed to have health-promoting properties. Based on these results, our novel strain is considered a safe and good probiotic and could hold high potential to be used as a starter culture or to safely supplement functional foods as a probiotic and may provide new insights into therapeutic interventions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research and Development in Dairy Products)
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Article
Acid and Rennet Coagulation Properties of A2 Milk
Foods 2022, 11(22), 3648; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11223648 - 15 Nov 2022
Viewed by 702
Abstract
This study investigated the acid and rennet milk coagulation properties of A2 milk (β-casein (CN) A2A2 genotype), in comparison to a control milk (blend of A2A1/A1A1/A2A2 genotypes). Acid and rennet coagulation were evaluated using the Optigraph® system, measuring the coagulation time, aggregation [...] Read more.
This study investigated the acid and rennet milk coagulation properties of A2 milk (β-casein (CN) A2A2 genotype), in comparison to a control milk (blend of A2A1/A1A1/A2A2 genotypes). Acid and rennet coagulation were evaluated using the Optigraph® system, measuring the coagulation time, aggregation rate, and gel density or curd firmness. The acidification kinetics were monitored using a CINAC® system, evaluating the time to reach pH 4.6, the acidification rate, the maximum acidification rate, the time required to reach it, and the latency time. The water-holding capacity of acid milk gels and the potential yield, total solids, and syneresis of enzymatic gels were also evaluated. Some variables were highly influenced by the farm factor, showing the importance of the effect of extrinsic parameters. Acid and enzymatic coagulation times were not affected in either milk. The A2 milk presented higher acid gel density and latency time than the control milk. Although the differences in water-holding capacity were not statistically significant, the A2 milk presented lower values, related with the higher gel density. The A2 milk also showed higher rennet aggregation rate and curd firmness than the control milk. Potential yield and syneresis were higher in the A2 milk, which is in accordance with the higher firmness of curd. Coagulation results and gel and curd properties indicate that it is possible to manufacture acid and rennet coagulation dairy products from A2 milk with no major differences when compared with a control milk. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research and Development in Dairy Products)
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Review

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Review
Cow’s Milk in Human Nutrition and the Emergence of Plant-Based Milk Alternatives
Foods 2023, 12(1), 99; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12010099 - 25 Dec 2022
Viewed by 1460
Abstract
Cow’s milk is considered a complete food, providing high-quality protein and essential micronutrients, including vitamins and minerals. For medical reasons or as a lifestyle choice, consumers are replacing cow’s milk with plant-based milk alternatives (PBMA); some perceive them as healthier alternatives to cow’s [...] Read more.
Cow’s milk is considered a complete food, providing high-quality protein and essential micronutrients, including vitamins and minerals. For medical reasons or as a lifestyle choice, consumers are replacing cow’s milk with plant-based milk alternatives (PBMA); some perceive them as healthier alternatives to cow’s milk due to their low saturated fatty acid content and no cholesterol content. However, the nutritional composition of PBMA is quite variable between different types and even within, which makes a comparison with cow’s milk a complex issue. Furthermore, the consumption of PBMA has been associated with the development of some diseases in infants and children. Meanwhile, the consumption of cow’s milk in human health is a controversial issue since it has been associated with a favorable effect in some diseases (such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, and Alzheimer’s) and a negative effect in others (such as prostate cancer risk and Parkinson’s disease); while in some diseases, there is no consensus in the cow’s milk consumption effect. The aim of this review is to make a nutritional comparison of cow’s milk with PBMA and to clarify the potential health issues related to their consumption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research and Development in Dairy Products)
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