Special Issue "Foodborne Toxin Detection and Prevention Research"

A special issue of Toxins (ISSN 2072-6651).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Alicia Rodríguez
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Guest Editor
Department of Animal Production and Food Science, Food Quality and Microbiology, University Institute for the Research in Agrifood Resources-INURA, University of Extremadura, Badajoz, Spain
Interests: food microbiology and safety, food mycology, foodborne pathogens, mycotoxins, gene expression, molecular ecology and biology; food science and technology; biocontrol and analytical methods, plant pathology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. María G. Córdoba
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Guest Editor
Food Quality and Microbiology, University Institute for the Research in Agrifood Resources-INURA, University of Extremadura, Badajoz, Spain.
Interests: food safety; food microbiology; toxigenic molds; biocontrol; prevention research
Prof. Dr. Alberto Martín
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Guest Editor
Food Science and Nutrition Area, University Institute for the Research in Agri-food Resources-INURA, Universidad de Extremadura, Spain
Interests: food chemnistry; food analysis; bioactive compounds; prebiotic; probiotic; food microbiology and safety
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The enhancement of food safety and biosecurity by developing new methods for the analysis of toxins and pathogens (bacteria and molds) in foods and new strategies to reduce or eliminate toxin contamination either plant or animal origin commodities is of great importance. This ensures the protection of consumer health and avoidance of economic losses to farmers, manufacturers, and retailers. Both the short-term and sometimes fateful consequences of toxins produced by the growth of foodborne bacterium including Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium botulinum, etc. and the long-term and chronic effects of mycotoxins synthesized by filamentous fungi in foods, create the necessity to design new and effective methods for detection and prevention of such undesirable compounds.

This Special Issue of Toxins looks forward to receiving contributions, either research papers or reviews, about the novel and original foodborne toxin detection methods and studies focused on finding prevention strategies of different types (chemical, physical, or biological).

Dr. Alicia Rodríguez
Prof. Dr. María G. Córdoba
Prof. Dr. Alberto Martín
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxins is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Bacterium
  • Molds
  • Toxins
  • Mycotoxins
  • Detection techniques
  • Prevention strategies

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Open AccessReview
Genomics of Maize Resistance to Fusarium Ear Rot and Fumonisin Contamination
Toxins 2020, 12(7), 431; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins12070431 - 30 Jun 2020
Abstract
Food contamination with mycotoxins is a worldwide concern, because these toxins produced by several fungal species have detrimental effects on animal and/or human health. In maize, fumonisins are among the toxins with the highest threatening potential because they are mainly produced by Fusarium [...] Read more.
Food contamination with mycotoxins is a worldwide concern, because these toxins produced by several fungal species have detrimental effects on animal and/or human health. In maize, fumonisins are among the toxins with the highest threatening potential because they are mainly produced by Fusarium verticillioides, which is distributed worldwide. Plant breeding has emerged as an effective and environmentally safe method to reduce fumonisin levels in maize kernels, but although phenotypic selection has proved effective for improving resistance to fumonisin contamination, further resources should be mobilized to meet farmers’ needs. Selection based on molecular markers linked to quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to fumonisin contamination or/and genotype values obtained using prediction models with markers distributed across the whole genome could speed up breeding progress. Therefore, in the current paper, previously identified genomic regions, genes, and/or pathways implicated in resistance to fumonisin accumulation will be reviewed. Studies done until now have provide many markers to be used by breeders, but to get further insight on plant mechanisms to defend against fungal infection and to limit fumonisin contamination, the genes behind those QTLs should be identified. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foodborne Toxin Detection and Prevention Research)
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