Valorization of Agro-Industrial Waste and By-Products for Food and Feed Applications

A special issue of Fermentation (ISSN 2311-5637). This special issue belongs to the section "Industrial Fermentation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 1836

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural, Food and Environment, University of Catania, Santa Sofia Street, 100, 95123 Catania, Italy
Interests: lactic acid bacteria; fermented food; functional food; probiotics; omics approach
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Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Sciences, Università degli Studi di Messina, Piazza Pugliatti, 1, 98122 Messina, ME, Italy
Interests: ruminant nutrition; ruminant physiology; immunometabolism; nutrigenomic; -omics approach; milk quality
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The management of agro-industrial wastes and by-products represents a relevant issue worldwide, leading to negative effects on the environment, economy, and society. Today, new processes and methodologies should be developed and applied in order to reduce their impact. Accordingly, the valorization/re-valorization of agro-industrial wastes and by-products is considered a suitable solution to improve the economic and environmental sustainability of the agro-food production chain. Food waste and by-products from several agro-food industries (vegetables, fruits, beverages, sugar, meat, aquaculture and marine products, seafood, etc.) represent an interesting and cheaper source of potentially functional or bioactive compounds, making them useful in meeting the need for more composite nutritional sources. Currently, functional foods and livestock feeds are developed through the valorization of agri-food waste and by-products.

This Special Issue aims to disseminate recent technological developments and novel strategies for the valorization of agro-industrial waste and by-products for food and feed applications. Original research articles, critical reviews, and perspectives are welcome to be submitted to this Special Issue, where potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Characterization and microbiological stability and safety of agro-industrial waste and by-products;
  • Fermentation process to improve nutritional value or to produce biologically active compounds;
  • Application of by-products as valuable feed supplements.

Dr. Alessandra Pino
Dr. Vincenzo Lopreiato
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fermentation is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • food waste
  • by-product
  • valorization
  • sustainability
  • microbial fermentation
  • biotechnology
  • microbiota

 

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

19 pages, 793 KiB  
Article
Leveraging Milk Permeate Fermentation to Produce Lactose-Free, Low-In-Glucose, Galactose-Rich Bioproducts: Optimizations and Applications
by Viviana K. Rivera Flores, Xingrui Fan, Timothy A. DeMarsh, Dana L. deRiancho and Samuel D. Alcaine
Fermentation 2023, 9(9), 825; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation9090825 - 8 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1225
Abstract
Previous studies highlighted Brettanomyces claussenii as a versatile yeast that produces ethanol or acetic acid from lactose, or selectively metabolizes glucose while leaving behind galactose, depending on different operational conditions. This flexibility enables the production of galactose-rich bioproducts from liquid dairy residues. The [...] Read more.
Previous studies highlighted Brettanomyces claussenii as a versatile yeast that produces ethanol or acetic acid from lactose, or selectively metabolizes glucose while leaving behind galactose, depending on different operational conditions. This flexibility enables the production of galactose-rich bioproducts from liquid dairy residues. The purpose of this study is to: (i) optimize the anaerobic fermentation of milk permeate (MP) by B. claussenii to maximize the yields of galactose and ethanol and minimize leftover glucose, and (ii) combine the optimized process with distillation and drying and characterize its multiple products. Response surface methodology was used for the optimization. Three fermentation parameters were chosen as input factors: temperature (25–35 °C), inoculation level (7.0–8.5 log cfu/mL), and time (4–40 days), with three metabolites as responses: galactose, glucose, and ethanol. The optimal combination of parameters resulted in temperature, 28 °C; inoculation level, 7.6 log cfu/mL; and time, 33 days. Under these conditions, the fermented product was predicted to have 63.6 g/L galactose, 4.0% v/v ethanol, and 0 g/L residual glucose. The optimal parameters were used to run 18 L fermentations followed by distillation and freeze-drying. As a result, four product streams were obtained and characterized for relevant physicochemical and nutritional attributes. Our results show that the partial fermentation of MP by B. claussenii can be the first step to develop lactose-free, low-in-glucose, galactose-rich bioproducts, which improve the value of this residue and broaden its applications in the food supply chain. Full article
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