Special Issue "Thermal Energy Management in Buildings"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Thermal Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. João M.P.Q. Delgado
Website
Guest Editor
CONSTRUCT, Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, 4200-465 Porto, Portugal
Interests: energy efficiency; hygrothermal behavior; thermal comfort; moisture safety; numerical simulation; well-being; indoor environment; passive and active comfort; recycled aggregates; 3D printing
Prof. Ana Sofia Guimarães
Website
Guest Editor
CONSTRUCT, Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, 4200-465 Porto, Portugal
Interests: energy efficiency; hygrothermal behavior; thermal comfort; moisture safety; numerical simulation; building rehabilitation; indoor environment; passive and active comfort; 3D printing
Prof. Adélio Mendes
Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
LEPABE, Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, 4200-465 Porto, Portugal
Interests: photo-electrochemical devices; electrochemical devices; energy efficiency; fuels; separation processes; materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since 50 years ago, the energy demand from buildings (residential and commercial) has grown by 1.8% per year, and it is predicted to grow from 2790 Mtoe (i.e., 116.8 EJ) in 2010, to over 4400 Mtoe by 2050, with most of this increase being from developing countries. Three-quarters of the total energy consumption in the buildings sector is residential, where there is great potential to improve energy efficiency. There is a presumption and need for these requirements to be applied, not only to new buildings, but also to the existing ones.

In the early of 2010’s, this objective was viewed as unrealistic. Now, with emerging materials for thermal energy management, the PV panels’ reduction of costs, and with the development electrochemical storage energy (batteries) and simulation technologies, suddenly, researchers and investors, and consequently, politicians, began to see this directive as possible, necessary, and potentially interesting to invest in.

The purpose of this Energies Special Issue on “Thermal Energy Management in Buildings” is to publish a set of research articles that demonstrate the effectiveness of innovative concepts, solutions, and materials, to fulfil the maximum building energy demands, meeting the long-term and changing needs and requirements of building users.

We invite researchers to contribute original research articles, as well as review articles that will stimulate the continuing efforts to understand the recent advances and innovation in these research fields. We are particularly interested in articles describing the recent trends, developments, and applications of new thermal energy management solutions capable of fulfilling the electrical, thermal, and cooling demands of low-energy consumption buildings. Manuscripts combining experimental implementation with theoretical calculations and techno-economic assessment are welcome.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Emerging materials for thermal energy management
  • Energy storage systems, including phase change materials and batteries
  • Advanced insulation materials, components, and systems
  • Modelling of advanced materials and technologies in buildings
  • Energy consumption in buildings
  • Near-zero energy buildings (nZEB’s) and zero energy buildings (ZEB’s)
  • Optimized solar-oriented envelope designs
  • Strong integration of renewable technologies
  • Improved air-tightness and highly efficient air conditioning systems
  • Economic/functional merit factor
  • Life-cycle assessment (LCA)
  • Energy policy

Dr. João M.P.Q. Delgado
Prof. Ana Sofia Guimarães
Prof. Adélio Mendes
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • emerging materials
  • energy management
  • energy consumption
  • renewable technologies
  • energy policy

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Phase Change Material Melting Process in a Thermal Energy Storage System for Applications in Buildings
Energies 2020, 13(12), 3254; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13123254 - 23 Jun 2020
Abstract
The development of thermal energy storage systems is a possible solution in the search for reductions in the difference between the global energy supply and demand. In this context, the ability of some materials, the so-called phase change materials (PCMs), to absorb and [...] Read more.
The development of thermal energy storage systems is a possible solution in the search for reductions in the difference between the global energy supply and demand. In this context, the ability of some materials, the so-called phase change materials (PCMs), to absorb and release large amounts of energy under specific periods and operating conditions has been verified. The applications of these materials are limited due to their low thermal conductivity, and thus, it is necessary to associate them with high-conductivity materials, such as metals, to make the control of energy absorption and release times possible. Bearing this in mind, this paper presents a numerical analysis of the melting process of a PCM into a triplex tube heat exchanger (TTHX) with finned copper tubes, which allowed for the heat transfer between a heating fluid (water) and the phase change material to power a liquid-desiccant air conditioning system. Through the analysis of the temperature fields, liquid fractions, and velocities, as well as the phase transition, it was possible to describe the material charging process; then, the results were compared with experimental data, which are available in the specialized literature, and presented mean errors of less than 10%. The total required time to completely melt the PCM was about 105.5 min with the water being injected into the TTHX at a flow rate of 8.3 L/min and a temperature of 90 °C. It was observed that the latent energy that accumulated during the melting process was 1330 kJ, while the accumulated sensitive energy was 835 kJ. The average heat flux at the internal surface of the inner tube was about 3 times higher than the average heat flux at the outer surface of the TTHX intermediate tube due to the velocity gradients that developed in the internal part of the heat exchanger, and was about 10 times more intense than those observed in the external region of the equipment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Thermal Energy Management in Buildings)
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Open AccessArticle
Industrial Ceramic Blocks for Buildings: Clay Characterization and Drying Experimental Study
Energies 2020, 13(11), 2834; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13112834 - 02 Jun 2020
Abstract
The conformation of a ceramic piece follows the steps of preparing the raw material, molding, lamination, drying, and firing. Drying is a thermodynamic process of heat and mass transfer, with dimensional variations of the product that requires a large amount of energy. Ceramic [...] Read more.
The conformation of a ceramic piece follows the steps of preparing the raw material, molding, lamination, drying, and firing. Drying is a thermodynamic process of heat and mass transfer, with dimensional variations of the product that requires a large amount of energy. Ceramic materials when exposed to non-uniform drying may suffer cracks and deformations, reducing their post-drying quality. Thus, this work aimed to study the drying of industrial ceramic blocks in an oven with forced air circulation. Experiments were carried out to characterize the clay and drying of the ceramic block at temperatures ranging from 50 °C to 100 °C. Results of the chemical, mineralogical, granulometric, differential thermal, and thermogravimetric analysis of the clay, and heating kinetics, mass loss, and dimensional variation of the industrial ceramic block are presented and analyzed in detail. It was found that the clay is basically composed of silica and alumina (≈ 80.96%), with an average particle diameter of 13.36 μm. The study proved that drying at high temperature and low relative humidity of the air generates high rates of mass loss, heating, and volumetric shrinkage in the ceramic product, and high thermo-hydraulic stresses, which cause the appearance and propagation of cracks, gaps, and cleavages, compromising the final quality of the product. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Thermal Energy Management in Buildings)
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Open AccessArticle
FEM Applied to Building Physics: Modeling Solar Radiation and Heat Transfer of PCM Enhanced Test Cells
Energies 2020, 13(9), 2200; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13092200 - 02 May 2020
Abstract
In passive solar buildings, energy can be stored using either sensible heat materials or latent heat materials. Phase change materials (PCM) can contribute to temperature control in passive solar buildings when melting occurs near to comfort temperature required for building’s interior spaces. The [...] Read more.
In passive solar buildings, energy can be stored using either sensible heat materials or latent heat materials. Phase change materials (PCM) can contribute to temperature control in passive solar buildings when melting occurs near to comfort temperature required for building’s interior spaces. The use of finite element method (FEM) as a numerical methodology for solving the thermal problem associated with heat transfer in current building materials and PCMs make sense, as it is a well-known technique, generalized and dominated, however, still little applied to the domain of building physics. In this work, a solar model was developed and applied in order to simulate numerically the effect of solar radiation incidence on each face of the test cells (with different solar exposures) without neglecting the main objective of the recommended numerical simulation: the study of the action of PCM. During the experimental campaign, two test cells with distinct inner layers were used to evaluate the effect of solar radiation: (i) REFM test cell (without PCM) with a reference mortar; (ii) PCMM test cell (with PCM) with a PCM mortar. The temperatures monitored inside the REFM and PCMM test cells were compared with the values resulting from the numerical simulation, using FEM with 3D discretization and the explicit modeling of the solar radiation, and the obtained results revealed a significant coherence of values. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Thermal Energy Management in Buildings)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

1. Title: A Complementary Buildings Performance Evaluation for Existing Dwellings with Low Heating Behaviours

    Authors: S.A. Magalhães, V.P. de Freitas, J.M.P.Q. Delgado and A. S. Guimarães

2. Title: Energy Performance of Residential Buildings in Mild Climates: Energy Certificate Label vs. Discomfort Index

    Authors: J.M.P.Q. Delgado, S. A. Magalhães and A. S. Guimarães

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