Special Issue "Feature Papers in Bio-Energy"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Bio-Energy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Fernando Rubiera González
Website
Guest Editor
Instituto Nacional del Carbón, INCAR-CSIC, 26 Francisco Pintado Fe, 33011 Oviedo, Spain
Interests: carbon capture; adsorption; biomass; gasification; combustion; cofiring
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Covadonga Pevida García
Website
Guest Editor
Instituto Nacional del Carbón, INCAR-CSIC, 26 Francisco Pintado Fe, 33011 Oviedo, Spain
Interests: abatement of CO2 emissions; coal and biomass utilization; hydrogen production
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of Energies is intended to present an ample variety of thematic areas in relation to all aspects of bio-energy production and use. Presently, there is an increasing concern of meeting energy demand while reducing dependency on fossil fuels. At the same time, a rapid global change to clean energy is urgently needed to prevent and mitigate the effects of climate change. These efforts are mostly directed towards replacing fossil fuels with renewable energy sources. This Special Issue has a wide scope and aims to collect high-quality research articles and review articles reflecting the latest progress in the research of bio-energy. In line with the scope of the Bio-Energy Section of Energies, topics in this Special Issue include but are not limited to biomass treatment, biofuels production by different conversion technologies, generation of heat and power from biofuels, and bio-energy and greenhouse gas emissions. We invite relevant experts in the above topics and colleagues to contribute feature papers reflecting the latest progress in their research field.

Prof. Fernando Rubiera González
Dr. Covadonga Pevida García
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • lignocellulosic biomass
  • microalgae
  • refinery
  • wastewater treatment
  • pyrolysis
  • gasification
  • microwave treatment
  • biochar
  • catalysis
  • beccs
  • bioethanol
  • biodiesel
  • biohydrogen
  • biofuel cells
  • anaerobic digestion

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Development of Full-Cycle Utilization of Chlorella sorokiniana Microalgae Biomass for Environmental and Food Purposes
Energies 2020, 13(10), 2648; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13102648 - 22 May 2020
Abstract
The application of microalgae biomass of Chlorella sorokiniana as environmentally friendly biosorbents for removing potentially toxic elements (PTE) from water and as a source of biofuel has been thoroughly studied. In this paper, we investigate its physicochemical properties infrared spectroscopy (IR spectra), microstructure, [...] Read more.
The application of microalgae biomass of Chlorella sorokiniana as environmentally friendly biosorbents for removing potentially toxic elements (PTE) from water and as a source of biofuel has been thoroughly studied. In this paper, we investigate its physicochemical properties infrared spectroscopy (IR spectra), microstructure, adsorption properties); we have managed to isolate the lipid complex, which amounted to 20% of dry biomass. Studies of the lipid complex showed that 80.02% of lipids are unsaturated fatty acids (C18:1, C18:2, C18:3). Additionally, we have investigated the efficiency of using the residual biomass obtained after lipid extraction for water purification from rare-earth metals (REM) and PTE. To increase the sorption properties of residual biomass, its thermal modification was carried out and sorption materials based on heat-treated residual biomass and chitosan were created. The physicochemical and mechanical properties of the obtained sorption materials were studied. The total sorption capacity was 31.9 mg/g for REM and 349.7 mg/g for PTE. Moreover, we propose a new method for the disposal of spent sorbents as additional fuel. Spent sorbents can be considered to be biofuel in terms of energy content (20.7 MJ*kg−1). The results of this study provide the basis for increased use of microalgae. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Bio-Energy)
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Open AccessArticle
Chemical Looping Co-Gasification Characteristics of Cyanobacterial/Coal Blends
Energies 2020, 13(9), 2352; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13092352 - 08 May 2020
Abstract
The frequent outbreak of cyanobacteria bloom results in an urgent need for the resource utilization of cyanobacteria. However, the development of routine thermal treatment (i.e., gasification and pyrolysis) is hindered by the issue of high moisture content. In order to minimize the dewatering [...] Read more.
The frequent outbreak of cyanobacteria bloom results in an urgent need for the resource utilization of cyanobacteria. However, the development of routine thermal treatment (i.e., gasification and pyrolysis) is hindered by the issue of high moisture content. In order to minimize the dewatering requirement, this study investigated the chemical looping co-gasification of the cyanobacteria/coal mixture. The results showed that the residual moisture of cyanobacteria not only could serve as the gasifying agent of coal, but also presented a better gasification effect than the injecting steam. Meanwhile, blending cyanobacteria also improved the performance of coal chemical looping gasification in terms of the syngas quality, gasification rate, and carbon conversion efficiency. Cyanobacteria pyrolysis supplied abundant hydrocarbons and hydrogen-rich gases. The highest syngas yield of 1.26 Nm3/kg was obtained in the mixture fuel of 46 wt.% cyanobacteria and 54 wt.% coal under a 0.3 oxygen carrier-to-fuel ratio. A slight interaction effect was observed in the pyrolysis process, in which the reactivity of coal pyrolysis was enhanced by the oxygenated groups of cyanobacteria volatile. The dominant motive of the interaction effect was the catalytic effect of alkali metals of cyanobacteria ash on the coal gasification. However, the formation of aluminosilicates deactivated alkali metals and further inhibited the char gasification. The intensity of interaction effect was demonstrated to be highly relevant with the (Na + K)/Al molar ratio of ash. The most prominent interaction effect occurred for the sample with 82 wt.% cyanobacteria, but a negative interaction was observed in the sample with 10 wt.% cyanobacteria. Both homogeneous reaction and shrinking core models showed the excellent fitting performance in the char gasification process. However, these two models could not be applied to the initial pyrolysis process because of the intricate mechanisms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Bio-Energy)
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Open AccessArticle
Energy Value of Yield and Biomass Quality in a 7-Year Rotation of Willow Cultivated on Marginal Soil
Energies 2020, 13(9), 2144; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13092144 - 30 Apr 2020
Abstract
Bioenergy plays a major role as a renewable energy source in the European Union. Solid biomass is derived mainly as wood from forests and wood processing plants. Willow plantations set up on marginal lands can be a supplementary source of wood for energy [...] Read more.
Bioenergy plays a major role as a renewable energy source in the European Union. Solid biomass is derived mainly as wood from forests and wood processing plants. Willow plantations set up on marginal lands can be a supplementary source of wood for energy generation. This study aimed to determine the energy value of yield and the thermophysical properties and elemental composition of the biomass of 7-year rotation willow harvested on marginal soil. Three varieties and three clones were cultivated in the Eko-Salix system on three marginal soils in northern Poland: riparian, alluvial soil, classified as heavy complete humic alluvial soil (Obory); organic, peat–muck soil formed from peat (Kocibórz); very heavy mineral clay soil (Leginy). Favourable conditions for obtaining high energy value biomass were at Kocibórz and Obory with a high groundwater level. The energy value of biomass at Leginy was lower than at Kocibórz and Obory (by 33% and 26%, respectively). The Ekotur variety had the significantly highest yield energy value (217 GJ ha−1 year−1) among the varieties and clones under study. This feature at Kocibórz and Obory was 288 and 225 GJ ha−1 year−1, respectively, and 139 GJ ha−1 year−1 at Leginy. Moreover, the biomass of this variety contained less ash (1.1% d.m.), sulphur (0.03% d.m.) and nitrogen (0.28% d.m.), which is beneficial from the energy-use perspective. Notably, the yield energy value of the UWM 095 clone biomass was also high (167 GJ ha−1 year−1). This study showed that willow grown in the Eco-Salix system can be a significant source of energy contained in good-quality woody biomass. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Bio-Energy)
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