Special Issue "Building Integrated PV System"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Solar Energy and Photovoltaic Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 21 May 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Nazmi Sellami
Website
Guest Editor
School of Engineering, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen AB10 7GJ, Scotland, UK
Interests: building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPVs); design of hybrid renewable energy systems; development of a new generation of PV/thermal solar concentrator; optimisation of PV panel tilts and orientations; using solar energy for medical treatment; solar air-conditioning; solar district heating
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Dr. Firdaus Muhammad-Sukki
Website
Guest Editor
School of Engineering, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen AB10 7GJ, Scotland, UK
Interests: optical concentrator; solar photovoltaics; building-integrated photovoltaics; renewable energy technology; renewable energy policies; nanotechnology law and policies
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Walid Issa
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Engineering and Mathematics, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield S1 1WB, UK
Interests: microgrid modelling and stability assessment; power flow control in microgrids; renewable energy integration; smart building design and integrated solutions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Buildings make up 40% of the total primary energy usage in the US and the EU, making them the main contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. Building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPVs) represents a potential solution to reduce the carbon footprint of buildings. BIPVs consist of integrating PV modules into a building to play the same role as its components: wall, window, or roof. BIPVs has the advantages of saving building material and reducing the electricity costs in addition to reduction in the use of fossil fuels and the emission of ozone-depleting gases. The electricity generated by BIPV modules can be used locally in the building, and the excess can be exported to the utility companies via grid interconnection. Compared to non-integrated systems, BIPV modules have the potential to be cheaper because they do not require allocated land or involve any additional infrastructure costs. In addition to the cost advantage, BIPVs can reduce the negative impact solar farms can have on agriculture, via land-use change, as well as on biodiversity.

The planning, design, and implementation of BIPV systems tend to be a more complex process than is the case for conventional PV systems as there are many important factors to consider. With BIPVs, there needs to be a balance between the power produced, the cost of the system, and the aesthetics―the focus should neither be only on electricity nor aesthetics. There needs to be improved building quality and energy performance in addition to addressing the aesthetics without forgetting safety and building regulations. As such, research studies about BIPVs involves different areas: building process, building physics, energetic design, aesthetical concept, economical concept, and building regulations.

This Special Issue aims to bring together the latest advances, experiences, findings, policies, and developments related to BIPVs.

Dr. Nazmi Sellami
Dr. Firdaus Muhammad-Sukki
Dr. Walid Issa
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • building-integrated PVs (BIPVs)
  • semi-transparent photovoltaics
  • building energy efficiency
  • PV façade
  • solar cell
  • PV windows
  • translucent photovoltaics

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Open AccessReview
Performance Improvement for Building Integrated Photovoltaics in Practice: A Review
Energies 2021, 14(1), 178; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14010178 - 31 Dec 2020
Abstract
Building integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) technologies are promising and practical for sustainable energy harvesting in buildings. BIPV products are commercially available, but their electrical power outputs in practice are negatively affected by several factors in outdoor environments. Performance improvement of BIPV applications requires mitigation [...] Read more.
Building integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) technologies are promising and practical for sustainable energy harvesting in buildings. BIPV products are commercially available, but their electrical power outputs in practice are negatively affected by several factors in outdoor environments. Performance improvement of BIPV applications requires mitigation approaches based on an understanding of these factors. A review was, therefore, conducted on this issue in order to providing guidance for practical applications in terms of the selection of proper PV technologies, temperature management, solar irradiation enhancement and avoidance of excessive mechanical strain. First, major types of PV cells used in BIPV applications were comparatively studied in terms of their electrical performances in laboratorial and outdoor environments. Second, temperature elevations were widely reported in outdoor BIPV applications, which may cause efficiency degradation, and the mitigation approaches may include air-flow ventilation, water circulation and utilization of phase change materials. The heat collected from the PV cells may also be further utilized. Third, mechanical strains may be transferred to the integrated PV cells in BIPV applications, and their effects on electrical performance PV cells were also discussed. In addition, the power output of BIPV systems increases with the solar irradiation received by the PV cells, which may be improved in terms of the location, azimuth and tilt of the cells and the transmittance of surface glazing. Suggestions for practical applications and further research opportunities were, therefore, provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Building Integrated PV System)
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