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Secondary Air Systems in Gas Turbines—Volume II

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "I2: Energy and Combustion Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 1519

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY, UK
Interests: turbomachinery; flow control; secondary air systems; uncertainty quantification
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY, UK
Interests: modelling of hot-gas ingestion through turbine rim seals; mainstream gas-path aerodynamics and the interaction with the secondary air system; heat transfer in compressor cavities; development of novel shaft sealing technologies; film cooling of turbine blades; cooled radial turbomachinery
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY, UK
Interests: fluid dynamics; gas turbine technologies; internal air systems and seals; thermal imaging techniques
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Guest Editors are inviting submissions to a Special Issue of Energies on the subject area of “Secondary Air Systems in Gas Turbines—Volume II”. In order to increase the cycle efficiency and specific work output of gas turbines, the turbine entry temperature (TET) is raised beyond the metallurgical limit of the engine components. Consequently, bleed air is taken from the compressor stages and used to cool the turbine. The intricate cooling pathways, seals, and metering devices are collectively known as the secondary air system (SAS). Effective use of the SAS is paramount: superfluous use of bleed air results in an uncompetitive engine design, whereas insufficient or ineffective cooling has a detrimental effect on engine life.

The aim of the present Special Issue is to collate and disseminate the current state-of-the-art in SAS design. Contributions will be sought from the world’s leading research groups in this field.

Dr. Mauro Carnevale
Dr. Carl Sangan
Dr. James A. Scobie
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • secondary air systems
  • cavity flows
  • rotor–stator systems
  • ingress and egress
  • mainstream gas path interactions
  • shaft sealing technologies
  • experimental measurement
  • computational fluid dynamics (CFD)

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

22 pages, 7335 KiB  
Article
Temperature Field and Performance Analysis of Brush Seals Based on FEA-CFD and the Porous Medium of Anisotropic Heat Transfer Models
by Xiaolei Song, Meihong Liu, Junfeng Sun, Juan Wang and Kun Wang
Energies 2023, 16(21), 7306; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16217306 - 28 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1152
Abstract
A brush seal is a type of contact sealing technology that generates a great amount of heat during operations. The heat can affect the seal’s performance and lifespan. To study the brush seals’ temperature distribution, a new model considering the anisotropic heat transfer [...] Read more.
A brush seal is a type of contact sealing technology that generates a great amount of heat during operations. The heat can affect the seal’s performance and lifespan. To study the brush seals’ temperature distribution, a new model considering the anisotropic heat transfer effect is established in this paper. The friction heat effect at the bristles’ tip is studied. The temperature field and leakage rates are obtained by using combined finite element analysis (FEA)-computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis and the anisotropic heat transfer theory. The influence of operating and structural parameters on the temperature field and the sealing properties of the brush seal are investigated. It is shown that the value of the rotation rate and the interference can cause the temperature of the brush seal to increase. The pressure difference enhances the convective heat transfer from the brush seals. While the temperature at the bristles’ tip increases, the radial average temperature of the bristles decreases significantly. In the case of a small pressure difference, the fence’s height can increase the windward area, leading to stiff bristles and resulting in a temperature increase at the bristles’ tip; however, the effective flow area increases, resulting in an acceleration of the radial temperature’s decrease. To summarize, the porous medium model of anisotropic heat transfer provides a new method for studying brush seals, and it can reflect the temperature distribution and leakage performance of brush seals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Secondary Air Systems in Gas Turbines—Volume II)
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