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Special Issue "Women in Energy Economics and Policy"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "C: Energy Economics and Policy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2022) | Viewed by 8048

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Claudia Kemfert
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Energy, Transportation, Environment at the German Institute of Economic Research(DIW), Hertie School of Governance, 10117 Berlin, Germany
Interests: climate; energy policy; energy economics and sustainability
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Elke Holst
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin), 10117 Berlin, Germany
Interests: gender economics; gender gaps in senior positions; gender pay gap; labor economics; remittances; working time

Special Issue Information

The Special Issue "Women in Energy, Economics and Policy" of the journal Energies aims to illustrate the impact of women in and for the energy industry to help solve the major challenges ahead.

The energy sector is facing major challenges and a comprehensive transformation. Climate change is advancing. To help mitigate the effects of climate change, emissions must be reduced significantly. The energy industry is facing a comprehensive transformation toward increased sustainability and climate protection. Conventional energies are being replaced by renewable energies. The structural change may reverse traditional role patterns (UN Woman 2018). A stronger participation of women in modern and innovative energy companies and energy cooperatives is visible, but is energy system transformation really female? Comprehensive decisions are still obviously strongly male-dominated—whether regarding energy policy and thus about state funding, or production, processing, and distribution on the part of companies (World Bank (2017, 2012)). This brings with it the risk of a biased perception of problems and solution strategies and thus the blinding of important aspects. Blind spot resolution is the contribution of women to solving the enormous challenges in the energy industry.

The changes in the energy industry also offer opportunities to increase the number of women in management positions and generally for the inclusion of women in decision-making processes. The proportion of women in the renewable energy sector is higher than in the conventional energy sector (IRENA 2019). In addition, women are often more affected by climate change, especially in developing countries (UN Woman 2018).

This planned Special Issue is therefore focused on the contributions of women in and to the energy sector and energy policy. In particular, it will analyze whether changes in the employment structure in the renewable energy sector are already apparent. All contributions are welcome that, from a gender perspective, deal with both the analysis of existing inequalities and their emergence as well as necessary measures for the future of the energy sector. Of particular interest are papers dealing with economic and political aspects and highlighting the contribution and role of women in this context. The contributions should include policy recommendations.

Possible topics include areas of:

  • The gender inequality in terms of hierarchical positioning and distribution between women and men in occupations (vertical and horizontal segregation)
  • The structures the hinder and promote greater equality in the sector and in energy policy decision-making processes
  • What needs to be done in companies and in politics to improve gender equality in the energy sector
  • The share of women in the renewable energy sector compared to conventional energy
  • Climate protection and sustainability in energy policy - increasing gender equality
  • Is energy system transformation feminine?
  • Can women benefit particularly from climate protection?
  • In which areas of the energy industry is the gender pay gap lowest/highest and why?
  • The company structures that contribute to the reproduction of gender inequality in the energy industry
  • What can companies and politics do to change this?
  • The economic costs and benefits are associated with the necessary change Gender-specific benefits/costs consider for traditional and renewable energy production in the short-, medium-, and long-term Gender budgeting of government expenditure on energy

Literature

IRENA (2019), Renewable Energy a Gender Perspective https://www.irena.org/publications/2019/Jan/Renewable-Energy-A-Gender-Perspective

UN Women (2018), Turning Promises into Action: Gender Equality in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women, http://www.unwomen.org/en/digital-library/ publications/2018/2/gender-equality-in-the-2030-agenda-forsustainable-development-2018

World Bank (2017), Energy access and gender: Getting the right balance, ENERGIA, http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/ en/463071494925985630/pdf/115066-BRI-P148200-PUBLICFINALSEARSFGenderweb.pdf, accessed 25 November 2018.

World Bank (2012), World Development Report 2012: Gender and Development, World Bank, Washington, DC. World Bank (2011), Mainstreaming Gender in Energy Projects— A Practical Handbook, https://ppp.worldbank.org/public-privatepartnership/library/mainstreaming-gender-energy-projects- %E2%80%93-practical-handbook.

World Bank (n.d.), Applying a Gender Lens throughout the Project Cycle, https://ppp.worldbank.org/public-privatepartnership/ppp-sector/gender-impacts-ppps/gender-lensproject-cycle/applying-gender-lens-throughout-project-cyc, accessed 7 October 2018


Prof. Dr. Claudia Kemfert
Adj.-Prof. Dr. Elke Holst
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Women in Kazakhstan’s Energy Industries: Implications for Energy Transition
Energies 2022, 15(13), 4540; https://doi.org/10.3390/en15134540 - 21 Jun 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 713
Abstract
Kazakhstan has a relatively high level of overall gender development, as well as of female employment in its energy industries. Diverse views and backgrounds are necessary to address the challenges of curbing emissions in Kazakhstan, a major fossil fuel producer and exporter. However, [...] Read more.
Kazakhstan has a relatively high level of overall gender development, as well as of female employment in its energy industries. Diverse views and backgrounds are necessary to address the challenges of curbing emissions in Kazakhstan, a major fossil fuel producer and exporter. However, our analysis of the Labor Force Survey indicates that female representation among energy sector managers and overall workforce has been falling over time. Moreover, we find that women in Kazakhstan’s coal mining, petroleum extraction, and power industries are concentrated in low-skilled and non-core occupations. Next, by analyzing data on labor compensation within energy occupations, we discover signs of persistent vertical discrimination, which may reduce incentives for women to upgrade their skills. Finally, we find that major shocks, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, may stall or reverse prior progress in increasing the energy sector’s gender diversity. Our findings contribute to raising gender awareness among the stakeholders in Kazakhstan’s energy sector in order to facilitate evidence-based gender mainstreaming. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Women in Energy Economics and Policy)
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Article
Strengthening Gender Justice in a Just Transition: A Research Agenda Based on a Systematic Map of Gender in Coal Transitions
Energies 2021, 14(18), 5985; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14185985 - 21 Sep 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3494
Abstract
For climate change mitigation, a rapid phase-out of fossil fuels such as coal is necessary. This has far-reaching gender-specific consequences. This paper presents a systematic map of the literature that examines the impact of historical coal phase-out processes on women and their role [...] Read more.
For climate change mitigation, a rapid phase-out of fossil fuels such as coal is necessary. This has far-reaching gender-specific consequences. This paper presents a systematic map of the literature that examines the impact of historical coal phase-out processes on women and their role in these processes. The search process consisted of screening over 3100 abstracts and reading 247 full-text studies. The analysis of the 73 publications ultimately included in the systematic map shows that past coal phase-outs meant both opportunities (e.g., increased labour market participation) as well as burdens for women (e.g., double burden of job and household). It becomes clear that agency within coal transitions was also gendered. For example, it was difficult for women to gain access to union structures, which led them to organise themselves into grassroots movements. Our research shows that policies aiming for a just sustainability transition should always be explicitly gender-responsive. However, the impact of sustainability transitions on women’s lives remains largely under-researched. Therefore, we propose a research agenda based on our findings containing six key issues that need to be addressed scientifically. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Women in Energy Economics and Policy)
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Article
Breaking the Dichotomies: Climate, Coal, and Gender. Paving the Way to a Just Transition. The Example of Colombia
Energies 2021, 14(17), 5457; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14175457 - 02 Sep 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1616
Abstract
Despite recognizing that climate change and its impacts are not gender-neutral, only few studies address the arising complexities. While in some climate-relevant sectors, such as the transport sector, there already is some initial research on the relationship between climate and gender, research on [...] Read more.
Despite recognizing that climate change and its impacts are not gender-neutral, only few studies address the arising complexities. While in some climate-relevant sectors, such as the transport sector, there already is some initial research on the relationship between climate and gender, research on the climate–gender nexus in the coal sector is still underdeveloped, and the few existing studies focus on dichotomous relations (gender–coal and coal–climate). This article discusses the currently neglected climate, coal, and gender triad and develops a conceptualization along the following aspects: (i) common lines of arguments, (ii) shortcomings in predominant arguments, and (iii) the state-of-the-art regarding the climate–gender–coal triad. To illustrate this outline, it uses the empirical case of the Colombian coal sector. Based on original data obtained via semi-structured interviews, it analyzes how imminent national-level climate policies for the coal sector, i.e., an energy transition, can be made gender-responsive and thus contribute to a just transition. The empirical example shows that women are already important change agents at the local level and in informal decision-making spaces. Although more research is needed to obtain further insights and evidence, this article contributes to the findings of more recent research which allow for the assumption that addressing climate and gender simultaneously may be mutually beneficial for both policy objectives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Women in Energy Economics and Policy)
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