Special Issue "Energy Systems in an Interconnected World"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy Fundamentals and Conversion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Zofia Lukszo
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Guest Editor
Engineering Systems and Services, Delft University of Technology, 2600 GA Delft, The Netherlands
Interests: smart energy systems
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Arjen van der Meer
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Intelligent Electrical Power Grids, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 4, 2628 CD Delft, The Netherlands
Interests: Arjen van der Meer is a researcher in the field of electrical power engineering. Main research topics include intelligent and integrated energy systems, assessing, exploring, and deploying the capabilities of smart grids by means of co-simulation.

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The energy transition interconnects, among others, energy systems that have been specialised in a certain domain for decades and were developed, built, and maintained in a strictly separated fashion. This has led to a predominantly technically optimised operation of power systems, gas networks, and district heating. The energy transition also concerns, however, energy consuming sectors. Therefore, sector coupling is needed, which refers to the idea of interconnecting the energy consuming sectors, i.e., transport, industry, and buildings (heating and cooling) with the power sector based on renewable electricity.

The currently ongoing digitisation and sustainable innovations of energy systems are much more rapid developments; can these go hand in hand and create synergies for our society? This all needs an inclusive, holistic approach for prototyping new concepts, reliable what-if analysis, and for exploring synergies between different energy carriers, infrastructures and their components. Standardised integration of domain-specific assessment tools (simulators, test setups), their overarching data structures, and semantics are hence eminent. Moreover, as future sustainable energy systems are complex sociotechnical systems with a social network of many players that “together” develop, operate, and maintain the technical systems and infrastructures, institutional questions should also be answered, e.g., who is in charge of managing the power flow, and what the rules for charging electric vehicles are.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to publish high-quality research papers as well as review articles addressing recent advances on complex technical, economical, and social aspects revolving around the energy transition, multi-energy systems, and the sector coupling. Original, high-quality contributions that are not yet published or that are not currently under review by other journals or peer-reviewed conferences are sought.

Prof. Dr. Zofia Lukszo
Dr. Arjen van der Meer
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Energy transition
  • Sector coupling
  • Interconnceted energy systems
  • Green hydrogen
  • Modelling of integrated energy systems
  • Simulation and tool development for complex energy systems
  • Holistic approaches for energy systems
  • Cross-domain interactions in energy systems
  • Power-to-X
  • Co-creative energy systems
  • Living Labs
  • Prototyping and roll-out of integrated energy systems
  • Energy affordability and poverty.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Odd/Even Order Sampling Soft-Core Architecture Towards Mixed Signals Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR) Applications
Energies 2019, 12(23), 4567; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12234567 - 29 Nov 2019
Viewed by 724
Abstract
Digitization is at the center of fourth industrial revolution (4IR) with previously analog systems being digitized through an analog-to-digital converter. In addition, 4IR applications such as fifth generation (5G) Cellular Networks Technology and Cognitive Electronic Warfare (EW) at some point interface digitally through [...] Read more.
Digitization is at the center of fourth industrial revolution (4IR) with previously analog systems being digitized through an analog-to-digital converter. In addition, 4IR applications such as fifth generation (5G) Cellular Networks Technology and Cognitive Electronic Warfare (EW) at some point interface digitally through an analog-to-digital converter. Efficient use of digital resources such as memory, largely depends on the signal sampling design of analog-to-digital converters. Existing even order sampling has been found to perform better than traditional sampling techniques. Research on the efficiency of a digital interface with a 4IR platform is still in its infancy. This paper presents a performance study of three sampling techniques: the proposed new and novel odd/even order sampling architecture, existing Mod-∆, and traditional 1st order delta-sigma, to address this. Step-size signal-to-noise (SNR), dynamic range, and sampling frequency are also studied. It was found that the proposed new and novel odd/even order sampling achieved an SNR performance of 6 dB in comparison to 18 dB for Mod-∆. Sampling frequency findings indicated that the proposed new and novel odd/even order sampling achieved a sampling frequency of 2 kHz in comparison to 8 kHz from a traditional 1st order sigma-delta. Dynamic range findings indicated that the proposed odd/even order sampling has achieved a dynamic range of 1.088 volts/ms in comparison to 1.185 volts/ms from a traditional 1st order sigma-delta. Findings have indicated that the proposed odd/even order sampling has superior SNR and sampling frequency performances, while the dynamic range is reduced by 8%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Systems in an Interconnected World)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Shale-Oil Development Prospects: The Role of Shale-Gas in Developing Shale-Oil
Energies 2019, 12(17), 3331; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12173331 - 29 Aug 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 794
Abstract
Currently, most of the world’s shale-oil is coming from the United States, but more may be needed from non-U.S. sources in order to keep the world price of oil from increasing, and yet a number of petroleum producing countries have yet to develop [...] Read more.
Currently, most of the world’s shale-oil is coming from the United States, but more may be needed from non-U.S. sources in order to keep the world price of oil from increasing, and yet a number of petroleum producing countries have yet to develop shale-oil resources. This article investigates why that may be. One reason for this may be the role that shale-gas development plays in the search for shale-oil. In the oil and natural gas industry over much of the 20th century, finding oil has usually been more valuable than finding natural gas because the gas has less energy density than oil, making each BTU (or Joule) of oil energy easier to store, transport and use for consumers. However, since shale source-rock often has both natural gas and oil, then it behooves a shale search process to start by looking for natural gas first rather than oil to enhance the profitability of the search process. The problem, then, is that a shale-oil only search strategy has the same problem that first plagued the oil and gas industry: What do you do with the natural gas? In this paper, we will examine how this “chicken and egg” exploration scenario has played out in the U.S. in order to draw lessons on how difficult shale-oil development will be for the rest of the world. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Systems in an Interconnected World)
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