energies-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Hydrogen Production from Biomass

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "A5: Hydrogen Energy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020) | Viewed by 9861

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Guest Editor is inviting submissions to a Special Issue of Energies on the subject area of “Hydrogen Production from Biomass”. The world’s energy system needs to be adapted into a more sustainable one, based on a diverse mix of renewable energy sources, among them biomass, which enhance power generation efficiency, proposing new energy vectors to improve effectiveness of renewables and addressing the pressing challenges of security of supply and climate change, whilst increasing the competitiveness of industries. In this context, technologies for hydrogen production from CO2-neutral precursors need to be addressed in terms of reliability, efficiency, cost, and environmental sustainability. The hydrogen production expected cost of about 2–10 €/kg (about 17 €/GJ, depending on biomass cost) will allow producing a fuel from renewables that are less expensive than that obtained from “traditional” energy sources. This can have a huge impact on the global fuels and energy markets.

Within the European UNIfHY project (2001–2016), we realized a continuous hydrogen production plant, PEFC grade, from biomass at industrial scale via steam gasification, WGS, and PSA, but different, even better routes are being analyzed and tested at present. Thus, this Special Issue will deal with all the hydrogen production from biomass systems (thermochemical, biochemical, etc.), related cleaning and conditioning systems (thermochemical, biochemical, electrochemical, etc.), and hydrogen from biomass use (e.g., via ICE, GT, FC) in order to try to encompass the last modeling, experimental, and demonstration activities on the area.

Prof. Dr. Enrico Bocci
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biomass
  • hydrogen
  • biomass conversion systems
  • cleaning and conditioning systems

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

16 pages, 2432 KiB  
Article
Devolatilization of Residual Biomasses for Chemical Looping Gasification in Fluidized Beds Made Up of Oxygen-Carriers
by Andrea Di Giuliano, Stefania Lucantonio and Katia Gallucci
Energies 2021, 14(2), 311; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14020311 - 8 Jan 2021
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 2257
Abstract
The chemical looping gasification of residual biomasses—operated in fluidized beds composed of oxygen-carriers—may allow the production of biofuels from syngas. This biomass-to-fuel chain can contribute to mitigate climate change, avoiding the accumulation of greenhouse gases in our atmosphere. The ongoing European research project [...] Read more.
The chemical looping gasification of residual biomasses—operated in fluidized beds composed of oxygen-carriers—may allow the production of biofuels from syngas. This biomass-to-fuel chain can contribute to mitigate climate change, avoiding the accumulation of greenhouse gases in our atmosphere. The ongoing European research project Horizon2020 CLARA (G.A. 817841) investigates wheat-straw-pellets (WSP) and raw-pine-forest-residue (RPR) pellets as feedstocks for chemical looping gasification. This work presents experimental results from devolatilizations of WSP and RPR, in bubbling beds made of three different oxygen-carriers or sand (inert reference), at 700, 800, 900 °C. Devolatilization is a key step of gasification, influencing syngas quality and quantity. Tests were performed at laboratory-scale, by a quartz reactor (fluidizing agent: N2). For each pellet, collected data allowed the quantification of released gases (H2, CO, CO2, CH4, hydrocarbons) and mass balances, to obtain gas yield (ηav), carbon conversion (χavC), H2/CO ratio (λav) and syngas composition. A simplified single-first order-reaction model was adopted to kinetically analyze experimental data. WSP performed as RPR; this is a good indication, considering that RPR is similar to commercial pellets. Temperature is the dominating parameter: at 900 °C, the highest quality and quantity of syngas was obtained (WSP: ηav = 0.035–0.042 molgas gbiomass−1, χavC = 73–83%, λav = 0.8–1.0); RPR: ηav = 0.036–0.041 molgas gbiomass−1, χavC = 67–71%, λav = 0.9–1.0), and oxygen-carries generally performed better than sand. The kinetic analysis suggested that the oxygen-carrier ilmenite ensured the fastest conversion of C and H atoms into gases, at tested conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrogen Production from Biomass)
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 2367 KiB  
Article
Biomass Steam Gasification, High-Temperature Gas Cleaning, and SOFC Model: A Parametric Analysis
by Vera Marcantonio, Danilo Monarca, Mauro Villarini, Andrea Di Carlo, Luca Del Zotto and Enrico Bocci
Energies 2020, 13(22), 5936; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13225936 - 13 Nov 2020
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2126
Abstract
Gasification technology is actually one of the most effective ways to produce power and hydrogen from biomass. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have proved to be an excellent energy conversion device. They can transform the chemical energy content in the syngas, produced by [...] Read more.
Gasification technology is actually one of the most effective ways to produce power and hydrogen from biomass. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have proved to be an excellent energy conversion device. They can transform the chemical energy content in the syngas, produced by a gasifier, directly into electrical energy. A steady-state model of a biomass-SOFC was developed using process simulation software, ASPEN Plus (10, AspenTech, Bedford, MA, USA). The objective of this work was to implement a biomass-SOFC system capable of predicting performance under diverse operating conditions. The system is made of a gasification zone, gas cleaning steps, and SOFC. The SOFC modelling was done without external subroutines, unlike most models in the literature, using only the existing ASPEN Plus blocks, making the model simpler and more reliable. The analysis of the syngas composition out of each cleaning step is in accordance with literature data. Then, a sensitivity analysis was carried out on the main parameters. The results indicate that there must be a trade-off between voltage, electrical efficiency, and power with respect to current density and it is preferable to stay at a low steam-to-biomass ratio. The electrical efficiency achieved under the operating conditions is 57%, a high value, making these systems very attractive. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrogen Production from Biomass)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

15 pages, 759 KiB  
Article
Development of a Chemical Quasi-Equilibrium Model of Biomass Waste Gasification in a Fluidized-Bed Reactor by Using Aspen Plus
by Vera Marcantonio, Enrico Bocci and Danilo Monarca
Energies 2020, 13(1), 53; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13010053 - 20 Dec 2019
Cited by 40 | Viewed by 4603
Abstract
In the delicate context of climate change, biomass gasification has been demonstrated to be a very useful technology to produce power and hydrogen. Nevertheless, in literature, there is a lack of a flexible and fast but accurate model of biomass gasification that can [...] Read more.
In the delicate context of climate change, biomass gasification has been demonstrated to be a very useful technology to produce power and hydrogen. Nevertheless, in literature, there is a lack of a flexible and fast but accurate model of biomass gasification that can be used with all the combinations of oxidizing agents, taking into account both organic and inorganic contaminants, and able to give results that are more realistic. In order to do that, a model of biomass gasification has been developed using the chemical engineering software Aspen Plus. The developed model is based on the Gibbs free energy minimization applying the restricted quasi-equilibrium approach via Data-Fit regression from experimental data. The simulation results obtained, considering different mixes of gasifying agents, were compared and validated against experimental data reported in literature for the most advanced fluidized bed technology. The maximum discrepancy value obtained for hydrogen, with respect to experimental data, is of 8%, and all the other values reached by the developed simulations, considering both organic and inorganic compounds, are in good agreement with literature data. The gas yield reached by the developed simulation is in the range of 1.1–1.3 Nm3/kg. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrogen Production from Biomass)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop