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Green and Smart Energy and the Bid to Reconcile Climate Change and Growth Prospects

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "B1: Energy and Climate Change".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2022) | Viewed by 7763

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
1. Institute of International Studies (ISM), SGH Warsaw School of Economics, Al. Niepodległości 162, 02-554 Warsaw, Poland
2. Effat College of Business, Effat University, Jeddah 21551, Saudi Arabia
Interests: smart cities; smart villages; international political economy (IPE); information and communication technology (ICT)
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Energy efficiency and energy sustainability are the key challenges that all stakeholders, including governments, the business sector, and citizens, have to address in a concerted manner, on the one hand, to protect the environment and, on the other hand, to promote socio-economic growth and development. The 2016 Paris Climate Agreement and the European Union’s Green Deal set, respectively, a framework and a benchmark, in which this double bid can be confronted. Outstanding issues remain, such as the cost of transition to green energy and the implications for specific countries, specific regions, and specific sectors of the economy. These are accompanied by questions regarding the regional and international impact of the actions that will be undertaken. In this context, reaping the benefits of sophisticated technology, connectivity, collaboration, and best practice sharing seems mandatory. This Special Issue seeks to encourage inter- and multi-disciplinary research on these topics.

The Editors of this Special Issue welcome submissions that address, but are not limited to, the following issues:

  • Energy connectivity
  • Regional and international collaboration in the field of energy
  • EU Green Deal
  • Energy efficiency and the business sector
  • Energy efficiency and business development strategies
  • Sustainable green transition
  • Smart services and smart applications
  • Smart and green technologies
  • Software engineering
  • Smart grids
  • Sensors for energy efficiency and energy sustainability
  • Energy efficiency in smart cities and smart villages context
  • Regional case studies, including those pertinent to the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), Central Europe, etc.
  • Novel modes of funding and financing green, smart, and sustainable energy infrastructure development projects

Prof. Anna Visvizi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

21 pages, 7042 KiB  
Article
Energy-Positive House: Performance Assessment through Simulation and Measurement
by Phillip Jones, Xiaojun Li, Ester Coma Bassas, Emmanouil Perisoglou and Jo Patterson
Energies 2020, 13(18), 4705; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13184705 - 9 Sep 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 4118
Abstract
This paper presents the results for the operating energy performance of the smart operation for a low carbon energy region (SOLCER) house. The house design is based on a ‘systems’ approach, which integrates the building technologies for electrical and thermal energy systems, together [...] Read more.
This paper presents the results for the operating energy performance of the smart operation for a low carbon energy region (SOLCER) house. The house design is based on a ‘systems’ approach, which integrates the building technologies for electrical and thermal energy systems, together with the architectural design. It is based on the concept of ‘energy positive’ buildings, utilising renewable energy systems which form part of the building envelope construction. The paper describes how the building energy model HTB2, with a range of additional ‘plugins’, has been used to simulate specific elements of the design and the overall energy performance of the house. Measurement data have been used in combination with the energy simulation results to evaluate the performance of the building together with its systems, and identifying the energy performance of individual components of the building. The study has indicated that an energy-positive performance can be achieved through an integrative systems approach. The analysis has indicated that the house, under normal occupancy, needs to import about 26% of its energy from the grid, but over the year its potential export to import ratio can reach 1.3:1. The paper discusses the performance gap between design and operation. It also considers the contribution of a transpired solar air collector (TSC) to space heating. The results have been used to gain a detailed understanding of energy-positive performance. Full article
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20 pages, 11940 KiB  
Article
Cooperative Demand Response Framework for a Smart Community Targeting Renewables: Testbed Implementation and Performance Evaluation
by Carlos Cruz, Esther Palomar, Ignacio Bravo and Alfredo Gardel
Energies 2020, 13(11), 2910; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13112910 - 5 Jun 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2892
Abstract
Demand response (DR) is emerging as the workhorse of achieving energy efficiency and reducing our carbon footprint, which persists as a major challenge amongst all the different energy-chain players, i.e., the utility providers, policy makers, consumers, and the technology sector. For instance, the [...] Read more.
Demand response (DR) is emerging as the workhorse of achieving energy efficiency and reducing our carbon footprint, which persists as a major challenge amongst all the different energy-chain players, i.e., the utility providers, policy makers, consumers, and the technology sector. For instance, the Internet-of-Things (IoT) paradigm and network-enabled appliances/devices have escalated the expectations of what technology could do for the acceptance of DR programs. In this work, we design, deploy on a scalable pilot testbed, and evaluate a collaboration-based approach to the demand-side management of a community of electricity consumers that jointly targets green consumption. The design of the framework architecture is centralized via the so-called aggregator, which optimizes the demand scheduled by consumers along with their time frame preferences towards the maximization of the consumption of renewables. On the pilot, we opt for lightweight, yet efficient platforms such as Raspberry Pi boards, and evaluate them over a series of network protocols, i.e., MQTT-TLS and CoAP-DTLS, paying special attention to the security and privacy of the communications over Z-Wave, ZigBee, and WiFi. The experiments conducted are configured using two active Living Labs datasets from which we extract three community scenarios that vary according to the flexibility or rigidity of the appliances’ operation time frame demand. During the performance evaluation, processing and communication overheads lie within feasible ranges, i.e., the aggregator requires less than 2 s to schedule a small consumer community with four appliances, whereas the latency of its link to households’ controllers adds less than 100 ms. In addition, we demonstrate that our implementations running over WiFi links and UDP sockets on Raspberry Pi 4 boards are fast, though insecure. By contrast, secure CoAP (with DTLS) offers data encryption, automatic key management, and integrity protection, as well as authentication with acceptable overheads. Full article
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