Special Issue "Exploration of Electrochemical Processes in Fuel Cells"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydrogen Energy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 September 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. K. Andreas Friedrich
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. German Aerospace Center, Institute of Engineering Thermodynamics, Pfaffenwaldring 38-40, D-70569 Stuttgart, Germany
2. Institute for Building Energetics, Thermotechnology and Energy Storage, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31, D-70569 Stuttgart, Germany
Interests: polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) and solid oxide fuel crells (SOFC); reaction and transport mechanisms; local degradation phenomena; performance and durability limitations; reduction of critical materials, in particular PGM loading; accelerated stress tests
Dr. Pawel Gazdzicki
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
German Aerospace Center, Institute of Engineering Thermodynamics, Pfaffenwaldring 38-40, D-70569 Stuttgart, Germany
Dr. Rémi Costa
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
German Aerospace Center, Institute of Engineering Thermodynamics, Pfaffenwaldring 38-40, D-70569 Stuttgart, Germany

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fuel cells are acknowledged as an essential part of the necessary transition of the future energy system. They contribute, in particular, to emission reduction in many parts of the world, helping to fulfil international commitments to climate protection. Fuel cell development has reached an advanced maturity stage, as demonstrated by the first series cars from Asian manufacturers and the successful market penetration of residential fuel cell systems in Japan. However, essential processes in fuel cells are still not understood well enough for rational development: Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) for transport application require a further reduction of PGM content, which leads to additional issues that limit performance and durability. These issues are still not well understood and need to be elucidated in detail, taking into account state-of-the-art materials as well as novel cell materials. In solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), cost reduction is pursued by developing new operation regimes (lower temperatures, less poisoning or deposition effects) with novel materials for electrodes, electrolytes, and bipolar plates, e.g., ultra-thin electrolyte layers or proton-conducting materials. The mechanisms of the reactions and transport processes have not been clarified for many systems. Moreover, the durability of fuel cells can be substantially increased by applying an appropriate operation strategy that mitigates critical events and undesired operation conditions which are also of great relevance to the fuel cell community. In this respect, multiscale multiphysics models for the description of dynamics processes in functional layers, cells, and stacks with high spatial resolution and with prediction capability are gaining importance.

Accordingly, this Special Issue “Exploration of Electrochemical Processes in Fuel Cells” welcomes contributions by experimental as well as by modeling works elucidating essential processes of solid-state fuel cells at the cell component up to stack level, including derived control strategies and accelerated stress tests.

Prof. Dr. K. Andreas Friedrich
Dr. Pawel Gazdzicki
Dr. Rémi Costa
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Performance and durability limitations in cells and stacks (PEMFC, SOFC)
  • Reduction or elimination of critical materials in fuel cells
  • Transport and reaction mechanisms
  • Reversible and irreversible degradation
  • Control strategy
  • Accelerated stress testing
  • Challenges in AEMFC and HT-PEMFC

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Durability of Alternative Metal Oxide Supports for Application at a Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Cathode—Comparison of Antimony- and Niobium-Doped Tin Oxide
Energies 2020, 13(2), 403; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13020403 - 14 Jan 2020
Abstract
In this study, the resistance to corrosion of niobium-doped tin dioxide (Nb-doped SnO2, NTO) and antimony-doped tin oxide (Sb-doped SnO2, ATO) supports has been probed for proton-exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) application. To achieve this goal, ATO or NTO [...] Read more.
In this study, the resistance to corrosion of niobium-doped tin dioxide (Nb-doped SnO2, NTO) and antimony-doped tin oxide (Sb-doped SnO2, ATO) supports has been probed for proton-exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) application. To achieve this goal, ATO or NTO supports with loose-tube (fiber-in-tube) morphology were synthesized using electrospinning and decorated with platinum (Pt) nanoparticles. These cathode catalysts were submitted to two different electrochemical tests, an accelerated stress test following the EU Harmonised Test Protocols for PEMFC in a single cell configuration and an 850 h test in real air-breathing PEMFC systems. In both cases, the dissolution of the doping element was measured either by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP–MS) performed on the exhaust water or by energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (X-EDS) analysis on ultramicrotomed membrane electrode assembly (MEA), and correlated to the performance losses upon ageing. It appears that the NTO-based support leads to lower performances than the ATO-based one, mainly owing to the low electronic conductivity of NTO. However, in the case of ATO, dissolution of the Sb doping element is non-negligible and represents a major issue from a stability point-of-view. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exploration of Electrochemical Processes in Fuel Cells)
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Open AccessArticle
Investigation of Corrosion Methods for Bipolar Plates for High Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell Application
Energies 2020, 13(1), 235; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13010235 - 03 Jan 2020
Abstract
In this work, different methods and electrochemical set-ups were investigated in order to study the corrosion behaviour of bipolar plates (BPP) for high temperature (HT) polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell application. Using confocal and scanning electron microscopy, it was shown that chemical and [...] Read more.
In this work, different methods and electrochemical set-ups were investigated in order to study the corrosion behaviour of bipolar plates (BPP) for high temperature (HT) polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell application. Using confocal and scanning electron microscopy, it was shown that chemical and electrochemical aging significantly increases surface roughness as well as morphology changes, confirming material degradation. Identical electrochemical corrosion behaviour was observed for both set-ups with typical quinone/hydroquinone peaks in the potential range ~0.6–0.7 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE). The appearance of the peaks and an increase of double layer capacitance can be related to the oxidation of carbon surface and, consequently, material corrosion. Simultaneously, an optimised corrosion set-up was introduced and verified regarding suitability. Both investigated set-ups and methods are useful to analyse the oxidation behaviour and corrosion resistance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exploration of Electrochemical Processes in Fuel Cells)
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