Special Issue "Advances in Energy and Environmental Economics"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "I: Energy Economics and Policy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Joanna Domagała
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Economics and Finance, Warsaw University of Life Sciences WULS – SGGW, 02-787 Warszawa, Poland
Interests: economics of enterprises and sectors; methods of assessing enterprise and market efficiency (including in particular the DEA method); energy and environmental economy; waste management; internationalization and globalization of the food industry sectors; logistics
Dr. Aleksandra Górecka
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Economics and Finance, Warsaw University of Life Sciences WULS – SGGW, Warszawa, Poland
Interests: transport economics; air transport; logistics; tourism economics; city logistics; spatial economy
Dr. Monica Roman
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Economics and Finance, Warsaw University of Life Sciences WULS – SGGW, 02-787 Warszawa, Poland
Interests: spatial economy; agricultural economics; price analysis; economics and market organization; logistics, transport
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Management of energy systems and natural resources have been the single most important determinant of the growth of industrial societies and the modern economy. Unfortunately, they have also been a key driver of many of the negative environmental trends, including climate change, pollution, environmental degradation, loss of biodiversity and ecosystem services, waste, and resource depletion. Energy systems play a critical role in determining our ability to achieve global sustainability in the short- and long-term, as they depend on natural  resources  and  are  among  the  most  significant  drivers  of  environmental impacts on the Earth’s physical and living systems. Therefore, it is indispensable to understand how environmental and energy issues and economy are linked.

This Special Issue aims to gather theoretical and empirical research, firmly grounded in economic theory, that advances our understanding of and provides novel insights into environmental and natural resource problems and policies broadly defined, as well as analyses of energy use and markets that link resource and environmental issues to energy. We also welcome studies with various approaches, from quantitative to qualitative.

Dr. Joanna Domagała
Dr. Aleksandra Górecka
Dr. Monica Roman
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • energy market
  • energy efficiency
  • environmental efficiency and productivity analysis
  • energy security
  • energy consumption
  • energy demand
  • time series analysis of energy economics
  • sustainable energy and environmental economics
  • sustainable logistics and transportation
  • sustainable smart cities
  • circular economy
  • waste management
  • renewable energy sources
  • energy and  environmental policy
  • directions of energy development

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Economic and Environmental Aspects of Agriculture in the EU Countries
Energies 2021, 14(22), 7826; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14227826 - 22 Nov 2021
Viewed by 320
Abstract
The analysis of the economic efficiency of agriculture has been the subject of numerous studies. An economically efficient agricultural sector is not always environmentally efficient. Agriculture is a large emitter of greenhouse gases. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change states that food production [...] Read more.
The analysis of the economic efficiency of agriculture has been the subject of numerous studies. An economically efficient agricultural sector is not always environmentally efficient. Agriculture is a large emitter of greenhouse gases. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change states that food production and agriculture are responsible for 21–37% of total global CO2 emissions. Due to the comprehensive assessment of the agricultural efficiency, it is worthwhile to apply to its measurement an integrated approach based on economic, energy and environmental aspects. These aspects were the main reasons for undertaking this research. The purpose of the study was to determine the economic, energy and environmental efficiency of agriculture in the EU Member States in 2019. The environmental analyses relate to the period 1990–2019. A total of 26 member states of the European Union (excluding Malta and Luxembourg) were selected for research. The sources of materials were Eurostat and the European Environmental Agency. This study was based on the Data Envelopment Analysis method, and used the DEA model focused on minimizing inputs. The research also adopts energy productivity and greenhouse gas emission efficiency indicators. The DEA model features the following variables: one effect (value of agricultural production) and four inputs (land, labour, use of fertilizers and use of energy). It was found that seven out of the 26 studied EU countries have efficient agriculture. The efficient agriculture group included The Netherlands, Denmark, Greece, Cyprus, the United Kingdom, Italy and Ireland. Based on the DEA method, benchmarks have been defined for countries with inefficient agriculture. On the basis of these benchmarks for inefficient agricultural sectors, it was possible to determine how they could improve efficiency to achieve the same results with fewer inputs. This issue is particularly important in the context of sustainable agricultural development. In the next stage of the research, the analysis of economic and energy efficiency was combined with the analysis of GHG emission efficiency in agriculture. Four groups of countries have been distinguished: eco-efficiency leaders, eco-efficiency followers, environmental slackers, eco-efficiency laggards. The leaders of the classification were The Netherlands, Italy, Greece, Cyprus and Portugal. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Energy and Environmental Economics)
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Article
Utilization of Renewable Energy Sources in Road Transport in EU Countries—TOPSIS Results
Energies 2021, 14(22), 7457; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14227457 - 09 Nov 2021
Viewed by 368
Abstract
The primary aim of this study was to assess and compare EU countries in terms of the use of renewable energy sources in road transport. The following research tasks were undertaken to realize this aim: (1) a review of the literature concerning the [...] Read more.
The primary aim of this study was to assess and compare EU countries in terms of the use of renewable energy sources in road transport. The following research tasks were undertaken to realize this aim: (1) a review of the literature concerning the negative externalities in road transport, the concept of sustainable development, and legal regulations referring to the utilization of renewable energy sources; (2) presentation of changes in energy consumption (both traditional and renewable) in road transport in EU countries in the years 2008–2019; and (3) identification of leaders among the EU countries in terms of consumption of renewable energy sources in road transport. The aim and tasks were realized using the literature review and TOPSIS method as well as descriptive, tabular, and graphic methods. The analysis was conducted for 28 EU countries according to the status for 2019. The period of 2008–2019 was investigated. Sources of materials included literature on the subject and Eurostat data. Although renewable energy sources accounted for as little as 6% of total energy consumption in road transport in EU countries in 2019, this is a significant topical issue. It results from the direction in which changes need to be implemented in terms of energy generation in this area of human activity. It turned out that blended biodiesel and blended biogasoline were the most commonly used fuels originating from renewable sources. The application of the TOPSIS method resulted in the identification of five groups of EU member countries, which differed in terms of the degree of utilization of renewable energy sources in road transport. Luxemburg, Sweden, and Austria were leaders in this respect. In turn, Malta, Estonia, and Croatia were characterized by very low consumption of renewable energy. The greatest progress in the utilization of renewable energy sources in road transport was recorded in Sweden, Finland, and Bulgaria (changes in the relative closeness to the ideal solution from 0.15 to 0.27), while the greatest reduction in relation to other countries was observed in Austria, Germany, and Lithuania (changes from −0.35 to −0.22). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Energy and Environmental Economics)
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