Special Issue "Applied Heat Pumps"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Thermal Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 21 February 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Lu Aye
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Group, Department of Infrastructure Engineering, Melbourne School of Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne 3010, Australia
Interests: sustainabilty; system simulation and optimisation; thermal storage; heat pumps
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Amitha Jayalath
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Group, Department of Infrastructure Engineering, Melbourne School of Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne 3010, Australia
Interests: sustainabilty; system simulation and optimisation; thermal storage; heat pumps

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ambient heat is the renewable energy that naturally exists in the surrounding environment. It is available perpetually; examples are ambient air, ground, and water bodies, whose temperatures are always greater than absolute zero (0 K). The main function of heat pumps is to extract ambient heat and deliver at the required temperature. Heat pumps can upgrade ambient heat for desired applications.

In general, low-grade waste heat is discharged to ambient air or water from industrial process heat-stream in many industries. Heat pumps can be used to effectively harness waste heat. They offer the possibility of reducing energy consumption significantly for various applications in a cost-effective manner.

Heat pumps of various capacities have been utilised in industrial, commercial, and residential applications. Some examples are desalination, drying and dehumidification, space heating, hot water, steam generation, heat recovery, and simultaneous heating and cooling.

Recent advances in computer hardware and software have enabled the design and operation of better and more cost-effective heat pump systems. Enabling technologies such as the Internet of Things, big-data analytics, dynamic optimisation, and real-time control create opportunities for new innovative solutions.

The purpose of this Special Issue is therefore to disseminate leading research findings and new knowledge in applications of heat pumps. We welcome high-quality and original works that have not been published or considered publishing elsewhere. The selected proposed manuscripts will be subject to a careful peer-review and editorial process.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Lu Aye
Dr. Amitha Jayalath
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • heat and mass transfer 
  • thermodynamics 
  • exergy 
  • vapour compression 
  • absorption 
  • new cycles 
  • ambient heat 
  • waste heat 
  • air source 
  • ground source 
  • water source 
  • desalination 
  • drying and dehumidification 
  • space heating 
  • simultaneous heating and cooling
  • hot water 
  • steam generation 
  • seasonal thermal-storage 
  • energy efficiency 
  • greenhouse-gas emissions 
  • coefficient of performance COP 
  • life-cycle cost 
  • dynamic optimisation 
  • real-time control 
  • environmental impacts 
  • market trends

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Full-Time-Scale Fluid-to-Ground Thermal Response of a Borefield with Uniform Fluid Temperature
Energies 2019, 12(19), 3750; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12193750 - 30 Sep 2019
Abstract
The most accurate method for the design and the simulation of a borehole heat exchanger (BHE) field is employing the fluid-to-ground thermal response of the field, namely the mean-fluid-temperature rise produced by a time-constant thermal power supplied to the fluid. Usually, a short-term [...] Read more.
The most accurate method for the design and the simulation of a borehole heat exchanger (BHE) field is employing the fluid-to-ground thermal response of the field, namely the mean-fluid-temperature rise produced by a time-constant thermal power supplied to the fluid. Usually, a short-term and a long-term model are applied, with results matched at a selected time instant. In this paper we propose a method to determine the full-time-scale thermal response of a BHE field that employs one numerical model and yields accurate results with a reasonable computation time. Each BHE is modeled as a one-material cylinder with the same radius as the BHE, surrounded by the ground and containing a heat-generating cylindrical surface whose temperature represents that of the fluid. The condition of uniform fluid temperature and time-constant total power supplied to the fluid, necessary for the long-term accuracy, is obtained iteratively, by imposing at the generating surface uniform time-dependent temperatures that converge to the desired condition. A 2 × 2 square BHE field is employed as an example. The method is recommended to obtain the thermal response of a BHE field with uniform fluid temperature, with high accuracy both in the short and in the long term. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applied Heat Pumps)
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