Special Issue "Printed Electronics"

A special issue of Electronics (ISSN 2079-9292). This special issue belongs to the section "Microwave and Wireless Communications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Hyun Wook Kang

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chonnam National University, Republic of Korea
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Micro contact printing, Gravure-offset printing, Molecular jet printing, Roll to roll (R2R) process, Organic thin film transistor (OTFT), Organic photovoltaics (OPV), Dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC), 3-diemensional printing, Chemical/Bio sensors.

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Printed electronics is recognized as a promising research area that enables a substitution for traditional silicon-based electronics due to its ability to fabricate devices, even on flexible substrates, and realize a high-throughput process. The interest in printed electronics is progressively increasing to achieve next-generation electronics, such as flexible displays, wearable computers, and the Internet of Things. For the successful realization of applications, lower temperature, easier fabrication, less time-consumption, and more cost-effective approaches are considered, and various printing techniques with organic materials as inorganic ones have been developed and analyzed for practical electronic devices. In order to ensure a successful approach to the potentially large market, which will be created by printed electronics, more effective research activities are required, with comprehensive studies on materials, printing processes, and demonstration of electronic devices.

In this Special Issue on Printed Electronics, potential topics could include, but are not limited to, original research work on recent developments in materials, processing, and applications. Examples include printed thin film transistors, photovoltaics, displays, sensors, batteries, and wearable devices.

Dr. Hyun Wook Kang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Electronics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Printable electronic device
  • Flexible electronics
  • Wearable electronics
  • Organic electronics
  • Large area electronics
  • Thin film transistor
  • Photovoltaics device
  • Display device
  • Sensors

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Effects of the Particle Size and the Solvent in Printing Inks on the Capacitance of Printed Parallel-Plate Capacitors
Received: 30 November 2015 / Revised: 18 January 2016 / Accepted: 22 January 2016 / Published: 2 February 2016
PDF Full-text (1209 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Parallel-plate capacitors were fabricated using a printed multi-layer structure in order to determine the effects of particle size and solvent on the capacitance. The conductive-dielectric-conductive layers were sequentially spun using commercial inks and by intermediate drying with the aid of a masking polymeric [...] Read more.
Parallel-plate capacitors were fabricated using a printed multi-layer structure in order to determine the effects of particle size and solvent on the capacitance. The conductive-dielectric-conductive layers were sequentially spun using commercial inks and by intermediate drying with the aid of a masking polymeric layer. Both optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the morphology of the printed layers. The measured capacitance was larger than the theoretically calculated value when ink with small-sized particles was used as the top plate. Furthermore, the use of a solvent whose polarity was similar to that of the underlying dielectric layer enhanced the penetration and resulted in an increase in capacitance. The functional resistance-capacitance low-pass filter was implemented using printed resistors and capacitors, a process that may be scalable in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Printed Electronics)
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Open AccessArticle
Self-Aligned Metal Electrodes in Fully Roll-to-Roll Processed Organic Transistors
Received: 30 November 2015 / Revised: 23 December 2015 / Accepted: 4 January 2016 / Published: 7 January 2016
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (3964 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We demonstrate the production of organic bottom gate transistors with self-aligned electrodes, using only continuous roll-to-roll (R2R) techniques. The self-alignment allows accurate <5 µm layer-to-layer registration, which is usually a challenge in high-speed R2R environments as the standard registration methods are limited to [...] Read more.
We demonstrate the production of organic bottom gate transistors with self-aligned electrodes, using only continuous roll-to-roll (R2R) techniques. The self-alignment allows accurate <5 µm layer-to-layer registration, which is usually a challenge in high-speed R2R environments as the standard registration methods are limited to the millimeter range—or, at best, to tens of µm if online cameras and automatic web control are utilized. The improved registration enables minimizing the overlap between the source/drain electrodes and the gate electrode, which is essential for minimizing the parasitic capacitance. The complete process is a combination of several techniques, including evaporation, reverse gravure, flexography, lift-off, UV exposure and development methods—all transferred to a continuous R2R pilot line. Altogether, approximately 80 meters of devices consisting of thousands of transistors were manufactured in a roll-to-roll fashion. Finally, a cost analysis is presented in order to ascertain the main costs and to predict whether the process would be feasible for the industrial production of organic transistors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Printed Electronics)
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