State-of-the-Art and New Trends of Power Electronics Technologies and Applications, Volume 2

A special issue of Electronics (ISSN 2079-9292). This special issue belongs to the section "Power Electronics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 March 2024) | Viewed by 3219

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Algoritmi Research Centre, Department of Industrial Electronics, University of Minho, 4800-058 Guimarães, Portugal
Interests: power electronics converters; electric mobility; renewable energy sources; digital control techniques; smart grids
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Industrial Electronics, School of Engineering, University of Minho, 4800-058 Guimaraes, Portugal
Interests: power electronics; power quality; active power filters; renewable energy; energy efficiency; electric vehicles; energy storage systems; battery charging systems; smart grids; smart cities; smart homes; technologies for innovative railway systems
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Power electronics is a comprehensive research area that intersects many areas of application, having contributed decisively, over several decades, to revolutionizing the lives of citizens and to the modernization and evolution of the vast majority of technologies that we use today, as well as increasing industrial competitiveness in all sectors of activity. Moreover, power electronics is essential for driving the evolution of different assets in the new paradigm of smart grids, covering an enormous range of applications, such as renewables, energy storage systems, load-shifting systems, electric mobility, innovative railway systems, solid-state transformers, active rectifiers, power quality conditioners, motor drivers, and also modern industrial processes. Additionally, it is crucial to highlight that the rapid evolution of power electronics is based on emerging technologies both for the power stage (e.g., new power semiconductors and passive components) and for the control system (e.g., innovative microprocessors and control algorithms). Embracing all these subjects in a transversal way, this Special Issue aims to institute a channel among the well-established state of the art and the new trends in power electronics technologies and applications, linking novel contributions from academics, scientists, and researchers.

The topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Power electronics for electric mobility (e.g., charging and traction systems).
  • Power electronics for renewables, energy storage, and load-shift systems.
  • Power electronics for power quality conditioners.
  • Power electronics for wireless power transfer (WPT) systems.
  • Power electronics for industrial electric machine drivers and integrated motor drivers.
  • Solid-state transformers based on power electronics for smart grids.
  • Power electronics for ac, dc, and hybrid power grids.
  • Sustainable electrical power systems supported by power electronics.
  • Smart homes, smart cities, and smart grids enabled by power electronics.
  • Advanced topologies of multilevel and modular power electronics converters.
  • Digital control strategies (e.g., power theories, predictive control, modulation techniques) for power electronics.
  • Advances in digital control platforms (e.g., microprocessors, microcontrollers, DSP, FPGA, real-time HIL) for power electronics.
  • Reliability and lifetime prediction of power electronics converters.
  • High-performance magnetic and capacitor technologies for power electronics converters.
  • Wide-band-gap (WBG) technologies (e.g., SiC, GaN) for power electronics applications.
  • New technologies of gate drivers and protection circuits for WBG technologies applied to power electronics applications.
  • Electromagnetic interferences in power electronics.
  • Innovative soft-switching techniques for power electronics converters.
  • Design of snubber circuits for power electronics converters.
  • High-power and high-density power electronics applications.

We look forward to receiving your contributions. 

Dr. Vítor Monteiro
Dr. Joao L. Afonso
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • power electronics
  • control scheme
  • energy storage systems
  • motor drive
  • renewable energy
  • multi-drive–multi-phase systems
  • wireless power transfer
  • smart grids
  • wide-band-gap (WBG) technologies

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 8485 KiB  
Article
Improving Low-Frequency Digital Control in the Voltage Source Inverter for the UPS System
by Zbigniew Rymarski
Electronics 2024, 13(8), 1469; https://doi.org/10.3390/electronics13081469 - 12 Apr 2024
Viewed by 473
Abstract
Today voltage source inverters (VSIs) operate with high switching frequencies (let us assume higher than 50 kHz) owing to the fast Si (Silicon) or SiC (Silicon Carbide) switching transistors. However, there are some applications, e.g., with slower switches (e.g., IGBT—Isolated Gate Bipolar Transistor) [...] Read more.
Today voltage source inverters (VSIs) operate with high switching frequencies (let us assume higher than 50 kHz) owing to the fast Si (Silicon) or SiC (Silicon Carbide) switching transistors. However, there are some applications, e.g., with slower switches (e.g., IGBT—Isolated Gate Bipolar Transistor) or when lower dynamic power losses are required when the switching frequency is low (let us assume about 10 kHz). The resonant frequency of the output filter is usually below 1 kHz. The measurements of Bode plots of the measurement traces of various microprocessor-controlled VSIs show that in this frequency range, the characteristics of these channels can be simply approximated through two or three switching periods delay. For the high switching frequency, it is not noticeable, but for the low frequency it can cause some oscillations in the output voltage. One of the solutions can be to use the predictor of the measured state variables based on the full-state Luenberger observer or the linear Kalman filter. Both solutions will be simulated in MATLAB/Simulink and the chosen one will be tested in the experimental VSI. The research aims to omit delays in the measurement channels for the low switching frequency by using the predictions for the measured state variables and finally increasing the gains of the controller to decrease the output voltage distortions. Full article
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25 pages, 6230 KiB  
Article
Improved Carrier-Based Modulation for the Single-Phase T-Type qZ Source Inverter
by Vitor Fernão Pires, Armando Cordeiro, Daniel Foito, Carlos Roncero-Clemente, Enrique Romero-Cadaval and José Fernando Silva
Electronics 2024, 13(6), 1113; https://doi.org/10.3390/electronics13061113 - 18 Mar 2024
Viewed by 699
Abstract
The Quasi-Impedance-Source Inverter (Quasi-Z inverter) is an interesting DC-AC converter topology that can be used in applications such as fuel cells and photovoltaic generators. This topology allows for both boost capability and DC-side continuous input current. Another very interesting feature is its reliability, [...] Read more.
The Quasi-Impedance-Source Inverter (Quasi-Z inverter) is an interesting DC-AC converter topology that can be used in applications such as fuel cells and photovoltaic generators. This topology allows for both boost capability and DC-side continuous input current. Another very interesting feature is its reliability, as it limits the current when two switches on one leg are conducting simultaneously. This is due to an extra conduction state, specifically the shoot-through state. However, the shoot-through state also causes a loss of performance, increasing electromagnetic interference and harmonic distortion. To address these issues, this work proposes a modified carrier-based control method for the T-Type single-phase quasi-Z inverter. The modified carrier-based method introduces the use of two additional states to replace the standard shoot-through state. The additional states are called the upper shoot-through and the lower shoot-through. An approach to minimize the number of switches that change state during transitions will also be considered to reduce switching losses, improving the converter efficiency. The proposed modified carrier-based control strategy will be tested using computer simulations and laboratory experiments. From the obtained results, the theoretical considerations are confirmed. In fact, through the presented results, it is possible to understand important improvements that can be obtained in the THD of the output voltage and load current. In addition, it is also possible to verify that the modified carrier method also reduces the input current ripple. Full article
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22 pages, 7927 KiB  
Article
The Design and Dynamic Control of a Unified Power Flow Controller with a Novel Algorithm for Obtaining the Least Harmonic Distortion
by Armel Asongu Nkembi, Nicola Delmonte, Paolo Cova and Minh Long Hoang
Electronics 2024, 13(5), 877; https://doi.org/10.3390/electronics13050877 - 24 Feb 2024
Viewed by 922
Abstract
This study investigates the control and dynamic operation of the Unified Power Flow Controller made of shunt and series converters, a Static Synchronous Compensator, and a Static Synchronous Series Compensator, respectively, connected back-to-back through a common DC-link capacitor. The model of a 48-pulse [...] Read more.
This study investigates the control and dynamic operation of the Unified Power Flow Controller made of shunt and series converters, a Static Synchronous Compensator, and a Static Synchronous Series Compensator, respectively, connected back-to-back through a common DC-link capacitor. The model of a 48-pulse Voltage Source Converter is constructed from a three-level Neutral Point Clamped converter, which allows the total harmonic distortion to be reduced. An optimal conduction angle tracking system of the three-level inverter is designed to minimize distortion by detecting proper harmonic component elimination. Starting from the six-step modulation strategy, the dq decoupled control schemes of both compensators in open and closed loops are presented. Finally, the MATLAB-Simulink model of the power flow controller is implemented and analyzed. The results show that the controller can track the power changes and apply a suitable voltage to the power system so that the power flow can be controlled. This way, the power flow controller dynamically improves the voltage and power quality across the power network while simultaneously improving the transient stability of the system. It can eliminate all system disturbances resulting from oscillations and harmonics in voltage and current within a very short time. The procedural approach used to model and simulate the Unified Power Flow Controller, as well as the new algorithm used to obtain the harmonic number that minimizes the total harmonic distortion, can be applied to any AC power system. Full article
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14 pages, 5224 KiB  
Article
A New System Supporting the Diagnostics of Electronic Modules Based on an Augmented Reality Solution
by Wojciech Kowalke, Krzysztof Górecki, Przemysław Ptak, Liam Cadigan, Brian Borucki, Nick Warren and Mario Ancona
Electronics 2024, 13(2), 335; https://doi.org/10.3390/electronics13020335 - 12 Jan 2024
Viewed by 676
Abstract
Printed circuit board assembly (PCBA) is a cost-effective hardware device used in mechanical, process, electrical, electronic, military, and medical equipment providing automated and digital functionalities for users. Keeping high quality standards in the PCBA production process is a major challenge for the electronics [...] Read more.
Printed circuit board assembly (PCBA) is a cost-effective hardware device used in mechanical, process, electrical, electronic, military, and medical equipment providing automated and digital functionalities for users. Keeping high quality standards in the PCBA production process is a major challenge for the electronics production industry. Defective PCBAs are submitted to analysis, debug, and repair processes. This paper presents an augmented reality (AR) fault diagnosis support system for assembled electronic systems—the Cadence inspectAR Augmented Reality Electronics Platform. The system’s functional concept and components are described. The steps of the diagnostic process are presented and discussed. The diagnostic capabilities of the system are illustrated with an example of the system’s use in industrial practice. The planned steps in the development of the elaborated system are indicated. Full article
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