Using Technology in Teaching Mathematics

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102). This special issue belongs to the section "Technology Enhanced Education".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2023) | Viewed by 29656

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Associate Professor, Department of Education, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD 21250, USA
Interests: mathematics education; teacher knowledge; teacher preparation and professional development; education technology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The use of digital technology in the teaching and learning of mathematics has been promoted as a fundamental principle for decades, but simply incorporating technology into instruction is unlikely to have a direct effect on learning by itself. Technology instead facilitates pedagogical changes, some of which could not be accomplished without the use of modern technologies. The use of effective technologies encourages mathematical reasoning, communication, and discovery, leading to improved student conceptual understanding. This upcoming Special Issue of Education Sciences aims to present an overview of the latest research on how technology can be used to promote and measure conceptual understanding. Papers on (but not limited to) the following themes are of interest:

  • Laying the foundation for the effective use of technology through theoretical and conceptual frameworks;
  • Using technology to support culturally relevant pedagogy;
  • Portraying mathematics phenomena through non-linguistic representations;
  • Supporting special populations in mathematics;
  • Building mathematics connections;
  • Engaging students through cooperative and collaborative learning;
  • Strengthening meta-cognition in mathematics;
  • Promoting mathematical thinking and reasoning;
  • Teaching mathematics through inquiry, discovery, experimentation, and simulation;
  • Connecting technology to curriculum;
  • Assessing student outcomes of technology in mathematics education.

Papers on student outcomes beyond achievement such as learning behaviors, student orientations, cognition and meta-cognition as well as those examining teacher and/or teaching outcomes are also welcome. Empirical studies should give explicit attention to relevant aspects of validity, reliability, trustworthiness, and transparency.

Prof. Christopher Rakes
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • technology
  • mathematics education
  • conceptual understanding

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

20 pages, 1622 KiB  
Article
Engaging Students in Mathematical Problem Solving with Technology during a Pandemic: The Case of the Tecn@Mat Club
by Hélia Jacinto
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(3), 271; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13030271 - 3 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 4082
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic and the requirement for social distancing led to the closure of extracurricular activities that usually involve teamwork and collaboration, such as math clubs. Research on the design and effectiveness of extracurricular mathematical activities that aim to promote student interest and [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic and the requirement for social distancing led to the closure of extracurricular activities that usually involve teamwork and collaboration, such as math clubs. Research on the design and effectiveness of extracurricular mathematical activities that aim to promote student interest and improve mathematical skills is limited, particularly in these challenging times. This exploratory case study examines an online after-school program, the Tecn@Mat Club, aimed at promoting middle grade students’ ability in solving mathematical problems with digital technologies during the pandemic. Based on document analysis, observation of the club sessions, questionnaires, and interviews with the participants (students and a mathematics education expert), this research documents the design and implementation of the Tecn@Mat Club, as well as its participants’ experiences and perspectives regarding the activity in which they engaged. The main results show the feasibility of adapting in-person, after-school math activities for an online setting, engaging middle grade students in mathematical problem-solving with technology by providing moderate mathematical challenges and promoting collaborative work. Results of a SWOT analysis (the acronym for strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats) allow for the identification of the key features to preserve and challenges to overcome in future replications of the club. Limitations of this study and future research directions are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Using Technology in Teaching Mathematics)
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13 pages, 722 KiB  
Article
Introduction to Computational Thinking with Scratch for Teacher Training for Spanish Primary School Teachers in Mathematics
by Álvaro Molina-Ayuso, Natividad Adamuz-Povedano, Rafael Bracho-López and Manuel Torralbo-Rodríguez
Educ. Sci. 2022, 12(12), 899; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12120899 - 8 Dec 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2586
Abstract
In recent years, the inclusion of computational thinking in education has become very important. This is a response to the needs of the evolution of our society and the skills demanded in students to obtain practical and integrated training. For this reason, the [...] Read more.
In recent years, the inclusion of computational thinking in education has become very important. This is a response to the needs of the evolution of our society and the skills demanded in students to obtain practical and integrated training. For this reason, the educational inclusion of these types of practices, strategies, and skills has been the subject of study in recent years. However, it is equally important to prepare and analyse the initial training of future teachers in this area. This research paper presents an empirical experience in which the degree of development of skills associated with computational thinking in preservice primary teachers is examined. For this purpose, programming practices with Scratch were carried out with a total of 149 students of primary education university degrees as part of their training in mathematics education. An experiment was designed for a control group and an experimental group with initial and final measurements using a validated diagnostic instrument consisting of 30 questions associated with computational concepts and their application: a computational thinking test. The result of the experience is positive, as a more significant improvement was observed in the experimental group, which was also accompanied by the impressions, provided by participants, that point in a positive, useful, and practical direction in terms of the development of this type of educational practice being relevant enough to introduce to the teaching and learning process of mathematics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Using Technology in Teaching Mathematics)
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16 pages, 1314 KiB  
Article
Teaching Mathematics with Technology: TPACK and Effective Teaching Practices
by Christopher R. Rakes, Michele L. Stites, Robert N. Ronau, Sarah B. Bush, Molly H. Fisher, Farshid Safi, Siddhi Desai, Ashley Schmidt, Janet B. Andreasen, Jon Saderholm, Lisa Amick, Margaret J. Mohr-Schroeder and Julian Viera
Educ. Sci. 2022, 12(2), 133; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12020133 - 18 Feb 2022
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 5045
Abstract
This paper examines how 17 secondary mathematics teacher candidates (TCs) in four university teacher preparation programs implemented technology in their classrooms to teach for conceptual understanding in online, hybrid, and face to face classes during COVID-19. Using the Professional Development: Research, Implementation, and [...] Read more.
This paper examines how 17 secondary mathematics teacher candidates (TCs) in four university teacher preparation programs implemented technology in their classrooms to teach for conceptual understanding in online, hybrid, and face to face classes during COVID-19. Using the Professional Development: Research, Implementation, and Evaluation (PrimeD) framework, TCs, classroom mentor teachers, field experience supervisors, and university faculty formed a Networked Improvement Community (NIC) to discuss a commonly agreed upon problem of practice and a change idea to implement in the classroom. Through Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles, participants documented their improvement efforts and refinements to the change idea and then reported back to the NIC at the subsequent monthly meeting. The Technology Pedagogical Content Knowledge framework (TPACK) and the TPACK levels rubric were used to examine how teacher candidates implemented technology for Mathematics conceptual understanding. The Mathematics Classroom Observation Protocol for Practices (MCOP2) was used to further examine how effective mathematics teaching practices (e.g., student engagement) were implemented by TCs. MCOP2 results indicated that TCs increased their use of effective mathematics teaching practices. However, growth in TPACK was not significant. A relationship between TPACK and MCOP2 was not evident, indicating a potential need for explicit focus on using technology for mathematics conceptual understanding. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Using Technology in Teaching Mathematics)
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27 pages, 2753 KiB  
Article
Self-Assessment in the Development of Mathematical Problem-Solving Skills
by Alice Barana, Giulia Boetti and Marina Marchisio
Educ. Sci. 2022, 12(2), 81; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12020081 - 24 Jan 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 6559
Abstract
Self-assessment, in the education framework, is a methodology that motivates students to play an active role in reviewing their performance. It is defined as “the evaluation or judgment of ‘the worth’ of one’s performance and the identification of one’s strengths and weaknesses with [...] Read more.
Self-assessment, in the education framework, is a methodology that motivates students to play an active role in reviewing their performance. It is defined as “the evaluation or judgment of ‘the worth’ of one’s performance and the identification of one’s strengths and weaknesses with a view to improving one’s learning outcomes”. The goal of this research is to study the relationship between self-assessment and the development and improvement of problem-solving skills in Mathematics. In particular, the investigation focuses on how accurate the students’ self-evaluations are when compared to external ones, and if (and how) the accuracy in self-assessment changed among the various processes involved in the problem-solving activity. Participants are grade 11 students (in all 182 participants) in school year 2020/2021 who were asked to solve 8 real-world mathematical problems using an Advanced Computing Environment (ACE). Each problem was assessed by a tutor and self-assessed by students themselves, according to a shared rubric with five indicators: Comprehension of the problematic situation, identification of the solving strategy, development of the solving process, argumentation of the chosen strategy, and appropriate and effective use of the ACE. Through a quantitative analysis, students’ self-assessment and tutors’ assessment were compared; data were cross-checked with students’ answers to a questionnaire. The results show a general correlation between tutor assessment and self-assessment, with a tendency of students to underestimate their performance. Moreover, students were more precise in self-assessing in the indicators: Development of the solving process and use of the ACE, while they had major difficulties in self-assessment for the indicators: Comprehension of the problematic situation and argumentation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Using Technology in Teaching Mathematics)
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20 pages, 730 KiB  
Article
Analysis of Differences in the Levels of TPACK: Unpacking Performance Indicators in the TPACK Levels Rubric
by Irina Lyublinskaya and Aleksandra Kaplon-Schilis
Educ. Sci. 2022, 12(2), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12020079 - 24 Jan 2022
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 4696
Abstract
Since the development of the technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) framework, researchers have been developing a variety of instruments to measure the TPACK of pre-service and in-service teachers. The task of developing an efficient, reliable, and valid instrument is difficult. Even validated instruments [...] Read more.
Since the development of the technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) framework, researchers have been developing a variety of instruments to measure the TPACK of pre-service and in-service teachers. The task of developing an efficient, reliable, and valid instrument is difficult. Even validated instruments require guidance for consistent use that preserves the instrument fidelity. The purpose of this study is to provide guidance for using the TPACK Levels Rubric, a validated instrument that was developed on the basis of the model for the progressive levels of TPACK. The authors systematically examined the criteria of the rubric in order to understand the differences in the levels of TPACK for each rubric component, and developed lesson exemplars to create guidelines for educators using this tool in assessing the TPACK levels of teachers. The iterative instrument analysis also led to the revision of the original rubric to establish the horizontal and vertical alignments and the consistency of the rubric, for each level across four components, and for each component across five levels. The construct validity of the revised rubric was confirmed on the basis of a exploratory factor analysis of 175 mathematics lesson plans and videos of taught lessons developed by graduate special education pre-service and in-service elementary school teachers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Using Technology in Teaching Mathematics)
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18 pages, 3225 KiB  
Article
Teaching Mathematics to Non-Mathematics Majors through Problem Solving and New Technologies
by Marina Marchisio, Sara Remogna, Fabio Roman and Matteo Sacchet
Educ. Sci. 2022, 12(1), 34; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12010034 - 7 Jan 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2240
Abstract
The role of mathematics in several scientific disciplines is undisputed; work and everyday life take great advantage of its application. Nevertheless, students often tend to not particularly like it and to consider it of little interest. It is also believed that only people [...] Read more.
The role of mathematics in several scientific disciplines is undisputed; work and everyday life take great advantage of its application. Nevertheless, students often tend to not particularly like it and to consider it of little interest. It is also believed that only people with a certain attitude are capable of mastering the subject. In consideration of this, we aimed to help science students develop mathematical competences by designing a course specifically oriented to applications and problem solving. We administered our course to students attending the first year of a program in biotechnology, asking them to work with technologies instilling curiosity and interest, thus achieving a better proficiency as a consequence. Two questionnaires, along with access and proficiency data, allowed us to collect information about students’ attitudes, beliefs, and activity, which we analyzed by means of descriptive statistics. The promotion of the interaction among learners made them active users of the contents, thus allowing for the adaptation of their learning paths according to their personal necessities, as well as the development of teamwork skills and flexibility. Finally, students recognized the usefulness of the problem-solving approach and the role played by software. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Using Technology in Teaching Mathematics)
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15 pages, 340 KiB  
Article
Calculus and Digital Natives in Rendezvous: wxMaxima Impact
by Natanael Karjanto
Educ. Sci. 2021, 11(9), 490; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci11090490 - 1 Sep 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1962
Abstract
This article covers how a computer algebra system (CAS) wxMaxima can be explored for teaching single-variable and multivariable calculus to Korean digital natives. We present several examples where wxMaxima can handle calculus problems easily, not straightforwardly but still successfully with some human intervention, [...] Read more.
This article covers how a computer algebra system (CAS) wxMaxima can be explored for teaching single-variable and multivariable calculus to Korean digital natives. We present several examples where wxMaxima can handle calculus problems easily, not straightforwardly but still successfully with some human intervention, and unsuccessfully. By soliciting qualitative feedback on students’ experience in exploiting the CAS, we gathered a mixed reaction. Although some students commented positively, the majority seemed to be resistant to embracing a new technological tool. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Using Technology in Teaching Mathematics)
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