Special Issue "Undergraduate Research as a High Impact Practice in Higher Education"

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 February 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Mark Brown
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences; Colorado State University; 1005 Campus Delivery Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
Interests: targeted therapy; oncology; small molecular inhibitors; monoclonal antibodies; gene targeting; protein targeting
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Shari Lanning
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Education Section, Department of Clinical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Higher education research indicates that student engagement is the most critical factor in retention programs for undergraduate students. Among the high-impact practices, undergraduate research/experiential learning has been shown to have the most positive effects with regard to promoting student engagement. In this Special Issue of Education Sciences, we invite papers related to: teaching innovations incorporating research; training undergraduate research mentors; best practices in undergraduate research; undergraduate research as a high-impact practice; methods for better assessing students, programs, and faculty involved in undergraduate research; case studies; and models for engaging students in undergraduate research. Original research papers, reviews, commentaries, and cases studies are welcome.

Dr. Mark Brown
Dr. Shari Lanning
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • student engagement
  • innovations in education
  • faculty-mentored undergraduate research
  • high-impact retention practices

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Undergraduate Research as a High Impact Practice in Higher Education
Educ. Sci. 2019, 9(3), 160; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci9030160 - 26 Jun 2019
Abstract
Higher education research indicates that student engagement is the most critical factor in retention programs for undergraduate students (Upcraft, Gardner and Barefoot, 2005; Tinto, 2012; Pascarella, Seifert, and Whitt, 2008). These studies illustrate that if students do not feel engaged, they are at [...] Read more.
Higher education research indicates that student engagement is the most critical factor in retention programs for undergraduate students (Upcraft, Gardner and Barefoot, 2005; Tinto, 2012; Pascarella, Seifert, and Whitt, 2008). These studies illustrate that if students do not feel engaged, they are at high risk for leaving their institution prematurely. Among high impact practices, undergraduate research has been shown to have the most positive effects with regard to promoting student engagement (Kuh, 2018; Kuh, 2008). Herein we highlight the use of mentored research as a high impact practice in undergraduate education, Further, we call upon the education community to share their models, approaches, observations, and research findings related to undergraduate research initiatives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Undergraduate Research as a High Impact Practice in Higher Education)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Open AccessArticle
Integrating Undergraduate Research into Social Science Curriculum: Benefits and Challenges of Two Models
Educ. Sci. 2019, 9(4), 296; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci9040296 - 13 Dec 2019
Abstract
Evidence shows that undergraduate research is beneficial to students during their college years and beyond. This study evaluates two models for integrating undergraduate research into the college curriculum: (1) integrating a community-based research project into a social science course and (2) designing a [...] Read more.
Evidence shows that undergraduate research is beneficial to students during their college years and beyond. This study evaluates two models for integrating undergraduate research into the college curriculum: (1) integrating a community-based research project into a social science course and (2) designing a senior seminar course as an undergraduate research experience. Findings show that students benefit from a hands-on research experience that deepens their understanding of both survey methods and social issues. While, students who participated in the community-based research project enjoyed interacting with community members and learning about community concerns, students in the senior seminar research experience ranked all aspects of the research project more favorably than students participating in the community-based research project. We discuss the benefits and challenges of both models as well as the implications of these findings and the steps instructors can take to improve the learning experience of undergraduates in the social sciences. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Undergraduate Research as a High Impact Practice in Higher Education)
Open AccessArticle
Undergraduate Disabled Students as Knowledge Producers including Researchers: A Missed Topic in Academic Literature
Educ. Sci. 2019, 9(4), 259; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci9040259 - 23 Oct 2019
Abstract
Research experience is beneficial for undergraduate students for many reasons. For example, it is argued in academic literature and in reports produced by various organizations that engage with science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education and science education that undergraduate research experience increases [...] Read more.
Research experience is beneficial for undergraduate students for many reasons. For example, it is argued in academic literature and in reports produced by various organizations that engage with science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education and science education that undergraduate research experience increases the graduation rate in STEM disciplines as well as the amount of students thinking about STEM careers. As such, being researchers should also be of benefit to undergraduate disabled students in all disciplines including STEM education. However, given that undergraduate disabled students encounter many problems within post-secondary education, including STEM education, undergraduate disabled students might encounter problems in becoming researchers. Policies are to be guided by knowledge and evidence. However, knowledge and evidence deficits exist in relation to the lived experience of disabled people. Undergraduate disabled students could decrease the knowledge deficit as researchers and knowledge producers. The numbers of disabled academic faculty are judged as being too low and efforts are under way to increase the number of disabled academics. Increasing the number of undergraduate disabled researchers might increase the available pool of disabled students that pursue an academic career. Given the important role research performed by undergraduate disabled students can play and given that many studies highlight problems for disabled students in post-secondary education in general, we used a scoping review approach to investigate the coverage of undergraduate disabled students as knowledge producers, including as researchers, in the academic literature. Using various search strategies, we obtained 1299 initial hits. However, only 15 had relevant content. No study investigated how undergraduate disabled students select their research topics or how they are enticed to pursue research projects outside of a course-based framework. No study looked at the linkage between being an undergraduate disabled researcher and career choices or using the obtained research skills on the undergraduate level in one’s role as a community member after graduation. Our findings suggest an opportunity for many fields, ranging from disability studies to STEM education, to generate more empirical data and conceptual work on the role of undergraduate disabled students as knowledge producers including as researchers. Such studies could help to increase the numbers of undergraduate disabled students as knowledge producers, including researchers, which in turn could help to increase (a) the number of disabled academics, (b) the number of disabled students who perform research in the community after graduation, (c) the degree success of disabled students and (d) the knowledge available on the social situation of disabled people. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Undergraduate Research as a High Impact Practice in Higher Education)
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