Special Issue "Educating the Future of Veterinary Science and Medicine"

A special issue of Veterinary Sciences (ISSN 2306-7381).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Assoc. Prof. Mark A. Brown

College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences Colorado State University1052 Campus Delivery Fort Collins, CO 80523-1052, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: molecular genetics; oncology; epigenetics; infectious disease

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

For the past two decades, veterinary educators have been at the forefront of innovations in educational practices related to science and medicine. Many of the resulting methods have been translated and implemented as best practices across the breadth of disciplines in higher education. However, past World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) global conferences have highlighted the necessity for improving global harmonization of veterinary medical education. This underscores a growing need for even broader dissemination of best practices and assessment programs related to educating our veterinary workforce. In this Special Issue of Veterinary Sciences, we invite papers related to: teaching innovations; best teaching practices; high impact practices; methods for better assessing students, programs, and faculty; educational research; case studies; and models for educating the future of veterinary medicine. Original research papers, reviews, commentaries, and cases studies are encouraged.

Dr. Mark A. Brown
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Veterinary Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Veterinary education
  • best teaching practices
  • assessment
  • educational innovations

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Educating the Future of Science and Medicine
Vet. Sci. 2018, 5(2), 34; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci5020034
Received: 24 February 2018 / Revised: 22 March 2018 / Accepted: 22 March 2018 / Published: 23 March 2018
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Abstract
For the past two decades, veterinary educators have been at the forefront of innovations in educational practices related to science and medicine. Many of the resulting methods have been translated and implemented as best practices across the breadth of disciplines in higher education. [...] Read more.
For the past two decades, veterinary educators have been at the forefront of innovations in educational practices related to science and medicine. Many of the resulting methods have been translated and implemented as best practices across the breadth of disciplines in higher education. However, past World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) global conferences have highlighted the necessity for improving global harmonization of veterinary medical education. This underscores a growing need for even broader dissemination of best practices and assessment programs related to educating our veterinary workforce. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Educating the Future of Veterinary Science and Medicine)
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Research

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Importance of Welfare and Ethics Competence Regarding Animals Kept for Scientific Purposes to Veterinary Students in Australia and New Zealand
Vet. Sci. 2018, 5(3), 66; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci5030066
Received: 13 June 2018 / Revised: 2 July 2018 / Accepted: 10 July 2018 / Published: 14 July 2018
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Abstract
Veterinarians are in a strong position of social influence on animal-related issues. Hence, veterinary schools have an opportunity to raise animal health and welfare standards by improving veterinary students’ animal welfare and ethics (AWE) education, including that related to animals used for scientific [...] Read more.
Veterinarians are in a strong position of social influence on animal-related issues. Hence, veterinary schools have an opportunity to raise animal health and welfare standards by improving veterinary students’ animal welfare and ethics (AWE) education, including that related to animals used for scientific purposes. A survey of 818 students in the early, mid, and senior stages of their courses at all eight veterinary schools across Australia and New Zealand was undertaken on their first day of practice (or Day One Competences) to explore how veterinary students viewed the importance of their competence in the management of welfare and ethical decision-making relating to animals kept for scientific purposes. From highest to lowest, the rankings they assigned were: Animal Ethics Committee (AEC) Procedures or Requirements; 3Rs (Replacement, Refinement and Reduction); Humane Endpoints; Euthanasia; “What Is a Research Animal?”; and Conscientious Objections. Female students rated Conscientious Objections, Humane Endpoints, and Euthanasia significantly higher than male students did across the three stages of study. The score patterns for these three variates showed a trend for the male students to be more likely to score these topics as extremely important as they advanced through the course, but female students’ scores tended to decline slightly or stay relatively stable. No gender differences emerged for the three variates: 3Rs (Replacement, Refinement and Reduction); AEC Procedures or Requirements; and “What Is a Research Animal?”. This study demonstrates that understandings of the regulatory and normative frameworks are considered most important in animal welfare and ethics competence in veterinary students. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to investigate what importance veterinary students place on their competence regarding animals kept for scientific purposes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Educating the Future of Veterinary Science and Medicine)
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Open AccessArticle
Ranking of Production Animal Welfare and Ethics Issues in Australia and New Zealand by Veterinary Students
Vet. Sci. 2018, 5(3), 65; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci5030065
Received: 30 May 2018 / Revised: 27 June 2018 / Accepted: 10 July 2018 / Published: 12 July 2018
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Abstract
The importance of animal welfare and ethics (AWE) within the veterinary education should reflect community concerns and expectations about AWE, and the professional demands of veterinary accreditation on the first day of practice (or ‘Day One’ competences). Currently, much interest and debate surrounds [...] Read more.
The importance of animal welfare and ethics (AWE) within the veterinary education should reflect community concerns and expectations about AWE, and the professional demands of veterinary accreditation on the first day of practice (or ‘Day One’ competences). Currently, much interest and debate surrounds the treatment of production animals, particularly around live export. To explore the attitudes to AWE of veterinary students in Australia and New Zealand, a survey was undertaken to (i) understand what students consider important AWE topics for initial production animal competence; and (ii) ascertain how these priorities correlated with gender, area of intended practice and stage-of-study. The results from 575 veterinary students showed that all students ranked strategies to address painful husbandry procedures as the most important issues on their first day in production animal practice. Additionally, it was found that the importance students assigned to an understanding of human–animal interactions declined as they progressed through the veterinary course. In contrast, the importance of an understanding of euthanasia issues for production animals increased for male students as they progressed through the course, and remained consistently high in females. Females also gave higher ranking to the importance of understanding production animal stress associated with transport, and ranked strategies to address painful husbandry procedures more important than did males. These findings should help the development of AWE teaching resources that address students’ attitudes and competence and that can be delivered when students are most receptive. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Educating the Future of Veterinary Science and Medicine)
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Open AccessArticle
Computer Assisted Learning: Assessment of the Veterinary Virtual Anatomy Education Software IVALA™
Vet. Sci. 2018, 5(2), 58; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci5020058
Received: 13 April 2018 / Revised: 14 May 2018 / Accepted: 11 June 2018 / Published: 19 June 2018
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Abstract
Although cadaveric dissection has historically been the cornerstone of anatomical education, it comes at the cost of some emotional, moral, safety, and environmental concerns. Computer assisted learning (CAL) programs are an increasingly common solution to these issues; however, research regarding the efficacy of [...] Read more.
Although cadaveric dissection has historically been the cornerstone of anatomical education, it comes at the cost of some emotional, moral, safety, and environmental concerns. Computer assisted learning (CAL) programs are an increasingly common solution to these issues; however, research regarding the efficacy of high fidelity simulation is limited. The traditional first semester veterinary gross anatomy course curriculum at Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine (RUSVM) was supplemented with a web based virtual anatomy program, IVALA™ (www.ivalalearn.com). The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between supplementary use of the IVALA™ program and student examination scores, and to measure student perception surrounding IVALA™. IVALA™ uses an interactive virtual canine specimen that enables students to identify, move, rotate, magnify, and remove individual anatomic structures while providing a text description of each selected anatomic point. Fifty-six first semester RUSVM students who supplemented their anatomic learning with the IVALA™ program performed significantly higher on examinations compared to students (n = 123) that did not (p = 0.003). Students’ overall perception toward IVALA™ was enjoyable (mean = 3.8 out of a 5-point Likert scale) and beneficial to their knowledge of anatomy (mean = 3.7); however, students did not support replacing cadaveric dissection with CAL (mean = 2.1). CAL can effectively supplement learning outcomes for veterinary anatomy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Educating the Future of Veterinary Science and Medicine)
Open AccessArticle
Exploring Shyness among Veterinary Medical Students: Implications for Mental and Social Wellness
Vet. Sci. 2018, 5(2), 56; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci5020056
Received: 26 April 2018 / Revised: 10 June 2018 / Accepted: 13 June 2018 / Published: 15 June 2018
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Abstract
Background: Shyness is defined as “the tendency to feel awkward, worried or tense during social encounters, especially with unfamiliar people.” While shyness is not necessarily a social disorder, extreme cases of shyness may classify as a social phobia and require medical treatment. Extant [...] Read more.
Background: Shyness is defined as “the tendency to feel awkward, worried or tense during social encounters, especially with unfamiliar people.” While shyness is not necessarily a social disorder, extreme cases of shyness may classify as a social phobia and require medical treatment. Extant research has noted shyness may be correlated with social problems that could be detrimental to one’s health, career, and social relationships. This exploratory study examined the prevalence, source, and nature of shyness among incoming Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program students at one veterinary medical school. Methods: One hundred first-year DVM program students were administered a modified version of the Survey on Shyness. Results: Results indicate most students (85%) self-identified as at least a little shy, a figure that is believed to be significantly higher than national population norms in the United States. Students attributed the primary source of shyness to personal fears and insecurities. Students reported frequent feelings of shyness and generally perceived shyness as an undesirable quality. Students reported that strangers, acquaintances, authority figures, and classmates often make them feel shy. Conclusions: Given the high prevalence of self-reported shyness among veterinary medical students, institutions may wish to include strategies to address shyness as part of a comprehensive wellness program. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Educating the Future of Veterinary Science and Medicine)
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Comparing Item Performance on Three- Versus Four-Option Multiple Choice Questions in a Veterinary Toxicology Course
Vet. Sci. 2018, 5(2), 55; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci5020055
Received: 29 May 2018 / Revised: 6 June 2018 / Accepted: 8 June 2018 / Published: 9 June 2018
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Abstract
Background: The number of answer options is an important element of multiple-choice questions (MCQs). Many MCQs contain four or more options despite the limited literature suggesting that there is little to no benefit beyond three options. The purpose of this study was to [...] Read more.
Background: The number of answer options is an important element of multiple-choice questions (MCQs). Many MCQs contain four or more options despite the limited literature suggesting that there is little to no benefit beyond three options. The purpose of this study was to evaluate item performance on 3-option versus 4-option MCQs used in a core curriculum course in veterinary toxicology at a large veterinary medical school in the United States. Methods: A quasi-experimental, crossover design was used in which students in each class were randomly assigned to take one of two versions (A or B) of two major exams. Results: Both the 3-option and 4-option MCQs resulted in similar psychometric properties. Conclusion: The findings of our study support earlier research in other medical disciplines and settings that likewise concluded there was no significant change in the psychometric properties of three option MCQs when compared to the traditional MCQs with four or more options. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Educating the Future of Veterinary Science and Medicine)

Review

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Open AccessReview
Peer Feedback on Collaborative Learning Activities in Veterinary Education
Vet. Sci. 2018, 5(4), 90; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci5040090
Received: 18 August 2018 / Revised: 28 September 2018 / Accepted: 15 October 2018 / Published: 17 October 2018
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Abstract
Collaborative learning activities are an increasingly prominent feature of veterinary curricula that have been redesigned to achieve competency-based graduate learning outcomes. This evolution challenges the traditional individualistic approach to veterinary education and necessitates revisions to assessment and feedback practices to ensure constructive alignment. [...] Read more.
Collaborative learning activities are an increasingly prominent feature of veterinary curricula that have been redesigned to achieve competency-based graduate learning outcomes. This evolution challenges the traditional individualistic approach to veterinary education and necessitates revisions to assessment and feedback practices to ensure constructive alignment. Peer feedback has been widely reported in the medical education literature as a teaching intervention in collaborative learning settings, with learning gains reported for students who receive and provide peer feedback. In this setting, peer feedback has been demonstrated to provide valuable formative feedback on professional behaviors and skills. However, there are very few such reports in the veterinary education literature to date. Barriers to the introduction of this approach can include teacher and student perceptions, and concerns around validity and reliability. This review aimed to provide an overview of current evidence regarding peer feedback on collaborative learning activities in higher education, and to explore opportunities and challenges for the introduction of peer feedback in the context of veterinary education. We contend that early and repeated provision of formative peer feedback can provide an opportunity to scaffold the development of crucial core competencies within veterinary education, including the self-regulated learning skills required to work in collaborative teams, and interpret and act on feedback. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Educating the Future of Veterinary Science and Medicine)
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