Special Issue "Development of Targeted Therapies for the Clinical Management of Cancer"

A special issue of Sci (ISSN 2413-4155).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 October 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Mark Brown
Website
Guest Editor
College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences; Colorado State University; 1005 Campus Delivery Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
Interests: targeted therapy; oncology; small molecular inhibitors; monoclonal antibodies; gene targeting; protein targeting
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The development of targeted therapeutics has revolutionized the approach to targeting cancer in a way that minimizes the adverse side-effects associated with broad-spectrum applications. For example, small molecule enzyme inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies can be designed to target the specific biomolecules involved in tumorigenic cascades. In this Special Issue of Sci, we invite papers related to the design, development, testing, and regulatory approval pathways associated with targeted oncology therapeutics. Potential topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Identification of cancer-specific targets
  • Methods for oncology therapeutic design
  • Types of targeted therapeutics
  • Gene targets
  • Protein targets
  • Small molecule inhibitors
  • Monoclonal antibodies
  • Targeting tumor-specific proliferation
  • Targeting angiogenic pathways
  • Targeting tumorigenic signal transduction
  • Special regulatory pathways for approval of targeted therapeutics

Prof. Mark Brown
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sci is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Targeted therapy
  • Oncology
  • Small molecular inhibitors
  • Monoclonal antibodies
  • Gene targeting.

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Other

Open AccessCommentaryPost Publication Peer ReviewVersion 2, Revised
Advancing Therapies for Cancer—From Mustard Gas to CAR T
Sci 2020, 2(3), 70; https://doi.org/10.3390/sci2030070 - 08 Sep 2020
Abstract
The development of targeted therapeutics for cancer continues to receive intense research attention as laboratories and pharmaceutical companies seek to develop drugs and technologies that improve treatment efficacy and mitigate harmful side effects. In the aftermath of World War I, it was discovered [...] Read more.
The development of targeted therapeutics for cancer continues to receive intense research attention as laboratories and pharmaceutical companies seek to develop drugs and technologies that improve treatment efficacy and mitigate harmful side effects. In the aftermath of World War I, it was discovered that mustard gas destroys rapidly dividing cells and could be used to treat cancer. Since then, chemotherapy has remained a predominant treatment for cancer; however, the destruction of dividing cells throughout the body yields devastating side effects including off-target damage of the digestive tract, bone marrow, skin, and reproductive tract. Furthermore, the high mutation rate of cancerous cells often renders chemotherapy ineffective long-term. Therapies with improved specificity, localization, and efficacy are redefining cancer treatment. Herein, we define and summarize the principal advancements in targeted cancer treatment and briefly comment on the march towards personalized medicine in the treatment of human cancer. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop