Special Issue "Epigenetic Factors of Embryological Development and Tumorigenesis"

A special issue of Veterinary Sciences (ISSN 2306-7381).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Mark Brown
Website
Guest Editor
College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences; Colorado State University; 1005 Campus Delivery Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
Interests: targeted therapy; oncology; small molecular inhibitors; monoclonal antibodies; gene targeting; protein targeting
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colelagues,

The development of organisms involves the regulation of patterns in gene expression. Those patterns are often set in a heritable condition through epigenetic modifications and associated pathways of cellular memory. In this way, the widespread synchronization in genetic patterns of expression ultimately determines cellular differentiation and developmental consequences during embryogenesis. Epigenetic aberrations are known to be associated with a range of developmental diseases and, in mature tissues, can also be associated with tumorigenic events. For this special issue, we invite papers related to the molecular, cellular, and developmental significance of epigenetics during embryological development as well as developmental and oncological diseases associated with epigenetic aberrations.

Dr. Mark Brown
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Veterinary Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • epigenetics
  • embryogenesis
  • developmental biology
  • epigenetic aberrations

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessCommunication
Characterizing the Role of SMYD2 in Mammalian Embryogenesis—Future Directions
Vet. Sci. 2020, 7(2), 63; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci7020063 - 12 May 2020
Abstract
The SET and MYND domain-containing (SMYD) family of lysine methyltransferases are essential in several mammalian developmental pathways. Although predominantly expressed in the heart, the role of SMYD2 in heart development has yet to be fully elucidated and has even been shown to be [...] Read more.
The SET and MYND domain-containing (SMYD) family of lysine methyltransferases are essential in several mammalian developmental pathways. Although predominantly expressed in the heart, the role of SMYD2 in heart development has yet to be fully elucidated and has even been shown to be dispensable in a murine Nkx2-5-associated conditional knockout. Additionally, SMYD2 was recently shown to be necessary not only for lymphocyte development but also for the viability of hematopoietic leukemias. Based on the broad expression pattern of SMYD2 in mammalian tissues, it is likely that it plays pivotal roles in a host of additional normal and pathological processes. In this brief review, we consider what is currently known about the normal and pathogenic functions of SMYD2 and propose specific future directions for characterizing its role in embryogenesis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epigenetic Factors of Embryological Development and Tumorigenesis)
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Open AccessArticle
Nitric Oxide as a Potential Adjuvant Therapeutic for Neuroblastoma: Effects of NO on Murine N2a Cells
Vet. Sci. 2020, 7(2), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci7020051 - 23 Apr 2020
Abstract
Neuroblastoma, the most common extracranial solid tumor in children, accounts for 15% of all pediatric cancer deaths. Pharmaceutical applications of S-Nitrosylation, which, under normal conditions is involved with a host of epigenetic and embryological development pathways, have exhibited great potential for use as [...] Read more.
Neuroblastoma, the most common extracranial solid tumor in children, accounts for 15% of all pediatric cancer deaths. Pharmaceutical applications of S-Nitrosylation, which, under normal conditions is involved with a host of epigenetic and embryological development pathways, have exhibited great potential for use as adjuvant therapeutics in the clinical management of cancer. Herein, an evaluation of the impact of nitric oxide (NO) as a potent anticancer agent on murine neuroblastoma cells is presented. Excitingly cell viability, colony formation, and non-carcinogenic cell analysis illustrate the significance and practicality of NO as a cytotoxic anticancer therapeutic. Resazurin, WST-8 (2-(2-methoxy-4-nitrophenyl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-(2,4-disulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, monosodium salt), and MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphyltetrazolium bromide) assays consistently displayed a moderate, ~20–25% reduction in cell viability after exposure to 1 mM S-Nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). A colony formation assay demonstrated that treated cells no longer exhibited colony formation capacity. Identically GSNO-treated Adult Human Dermal Fibroblasts (HDFa) exhibited no decrease in viability, indicating potential discrimination between neoplastic and normal cells. Collectively, our findings indicate a potential application for NO as an adjuvant therapeutic in the clinical management of neuroblastoma. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epigenetic Factors of Embryological Development and Tumorigenesis)
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