Special Issue "Epigenetics and Disease"

A special issue of Diseases (ISSN 2079-9721).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2020) | Viewed by 17265

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Mark Brown
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Clinical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
2. Epidemiology Section, Colorado School of Public Health, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
3. Cell and Molecular Biology Program, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
Interests: molecular genetics; epigenetic factors of disease; cultural and environmental factors of disease
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The development of tissues involves the direction of specific programs for gene expression among distinct cell types. Those programs are often established in a heritable state by virtue of epigenetic mechanisms and corresponding pathways of cellular memory. Thus, the broad synchronization in patterns of gene expression ultimately dictates cellular consequences. Aberrations in these epigenetic mechanisms are known to be associated with a range of diseases. This correlation between epigenetic aberrations and disease is the focus of this Special Issue of Diseases. For this issue, we invite papers related to the molecular, cellular, and clinical significance of epigenetic aberrations as well as treatments based on the modulation of epigenetic mechanisms in the clinical management of disease.

Assoc. Prof. Mark A. Brown
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diseases is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • epigenetics
  • disease
  • chromatin modifications
  • transcriptional regulation

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research, Review

Editorial
Epigenetic Factors of Disease
Diseases 2019, 7(2), 42; https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases7020042 - 14 Jun 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2269
Abstract
The development of tissues involves the direction of specific programs for gene expression among distinct cell types. These programs are often established in a heritable state by virtue of epigenetic mechanisms and corresponding pathways of cellular memory. Thus, the broad synchronization in patterns [...] Read more.
The development of tissues involves the direction of specific programs for gene expression among distinct cell types. These programs are often established in a heritable state by virtue of epigenetic mechanisms and corresponding pathways of cellular memory. Thus, the broad synchronization in patterns of gene expression ultimately dictates cellular consequences. Aberrations in these epigenetic mechanisms are known to be associated with a range of diseases. Herein, we highlight epigenetic factors that, when aberrantly expressed, lead to a broad range of diseases. Further, we call upon the community of biomedical researchers to share their findings related to the epigenetic factors of disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epigenetics and Disease)

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Review

Communication
Epigenetics—Shedding Light on the Path Ahead for Material Sciences
Diseases 2019, 7(2), 43; https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases7020043 - 14 Jun 2019
Viewed by 2075
Abstract
The harmonious regulation of bodily function is a necessity for healthy individuals. Looking from the viewpoint of material sciences, one can only marvel at the cellular factories, their renewal, and the overall control of messaging and control of responses. As aging progresses and/or [...] Read more.
The harmonious regulation of bodily function is a necessity for healthy individuals. Looking from the viewpoint of material sciences, one can only marvel at the cellular factories, their renewal, and the overall control of messaging and control of responses. As aging progresses and/or pathologies arise, clinicians may be forced to look for replacement of organs/tissues with medical devices. Since all devices are tailored, a detailed understanding of developmental processes, including aberrant processes leading to pathologies, is crucial to provide clinicians with a suitable device. Although research in the field of epigenetics has produced effective therapeutics and diagnostic markers, our currently fragmented understanding of epigenetic processes as they relate to material development is inherently limited, with logical implications for the success of medical procedures. Here, we illustrate how material sciences for clinical applications, critically depend on all aspects of biomedical sciences, including the field of epigenetics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epigenetics and Disease)

Review

Jump to: Editorial, Research

Review
Glycoprotein G-protein Coupled Receptors in Disease: Luteinizing Hormone Receptors and Follicle Stimulating Hormone Receptors
Diseases 2020, 8(3), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases8030035 - 15 Sep 2020
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2886
Abstract
Signal transduction by luteinizing hormone receptors (LHRs) and follicle-stimulating hormone receptors (FSHRs) is essential for the successful reproduction of human beings. Both receptors and the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor are members of a subset of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) described as the glycoprotein hormone [...] Read more.
Signal transduction by luteinizing hormone receptors (LHRs) and follicle-stimulating hormone receptors (FSHRs) is essential for the successful reproduction of human beings. Both receptors and the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor are members of a subset of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) described as the glycoprotein hormone receptors. Their ligands, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) and a structurally related hormone produced in pregnancy, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), are large protein hormones that are extensively glycosylated. Although the primary physiologic functions of these receptors are in ovarian function and maintenance of pregnancy in human females and spermatogenesis in males, there are reports of LHRs or FSHRs involvement in disease processes both in the reproductive system and elsewhere. In this review, we evaluate the aggregation state of the structure of actively signaling LHRs or FSHRs, their functions in reproduction as well as summarizing disease processes related to receptor mutations affecting receptor function or expression in reproductive and non-reproductive tissues. We will also present novel strategies for either increasing or reducing the activity of LHRs signaling. Such approaches to modify signaling by glycoprotein receptors may prove advantageous in treating diseases relating to LHRs or FSHRs function in addition to furthering the identification of new strategies for modulating GPCR signaling. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epigenetics and Disease)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Review
Histone Deacetylases and Their Inhibitors in Cancer Epigenetics
Diseases 2019, 7(4), 57; https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases7040057 - 01 Nov 2019
Cited by 30 | Viewed by 3538
Abstract
Histone deacetylases (HDAC) and histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have greatly impacted the war on cancer. Their role in epigenetics has significantly altered the development of anticancer drugs used to treat the most rare, persistent forms of cancer. During transcription, HDAC and HDACi are [...] Read more.
Histone deacetylases (HDAC) and histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have greatly impacted the war on cancer. Their role in epigenetics has significantly altered the development of anticancer drugs used to treat the most rare, persistent forms of cancer. During transcription, HDAC and HDACi are used to regulate the genetic mutations found in cancerous cells by removing and/or preventing the removal of the acetyl group on specific histones. This activity determines the relaxed or condensed conformation of the nucleosome, changing the accessibility zones for transcription factors. These modifications lead to other biological processes for the cell, including cell cycle progression, proliferation, and differentiation. Each HDAC and HDACi class or group has a distinctive mechanism of action that can be utilized to halt the progression of cancerous cell growth. While the use of HDAC- and HDACi-derived compounds are relatively new in treatment of cancers, they have a proven efficacy when the appropriately utilized. This following manuscript highlights the mechanisms of action utilized by HDAC and HDACi in various cancer, their role in epigenetics, current drug manufacturers, and the impact predicative modeling systems have on cancer therapeutic drug discovery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epigenetics and Disease)
Review
Epigenetics and Mechanobiology in Heart Development and Congenital Heart Disease
Diseases 2019, 7(3), 52; https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases7030052 - 01 Sep 2019
Cited by 31 | Viewed by 6084
Abstract
Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common birth defect worldwide and the number one killer of live-born infants in the United States. Heart development occurs early in embryogenesis and involves complex interactions between multiple cell populations, limiting the understanding and consequent treatment [...] Read more.
Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common birth defect worldwide and the number one killer of live-born infants in the United States. Heart development occurs early in embryogenesis and involves complex interactions between multiple cell populations, limiting the understanding and consequent treatment of CHD. Furthermore, genome sequencing has largely failed to predict or yield therapeutics for CHD. In addition to the underlying genome, epigenetics and mechanobiology both drive heart development. A growing body of evidence implicates the aberrant regulation of these two extra-genomic systems in the pathogenesis of CHD. In this review, we describe the stages of human heart development and the heart defects known to manifest at each stage. Next, we discuss the distinct and overlapping roles of epigenetics and mechanobiology in normal development and in the pathogenesis of CHD. Finally, we highlight recent advances in the identification of novel epigenetic biomarkers and environmental risk factors that may be useful for improved diagnosis and further elucidation of CHD etiology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epigenetics and Disease)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop