Special Issue "Systematics and Phylogeny of Weevils"

A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Rolf Oberprieler

Australian National Insect Collection, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Canberra, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: weevil systematics and phylogeny; evolution and fossil history; biology and host associations; morphology; emphasis on the faunas of Australia and Africa
Guest Editor
Dr. Adriana Marvaldi

Universidad Nacional de La Plata, División Entomología, La Plata, Argentina
Website | E-Mail
Interests: phylogenetic systematics of Curculionoidea; larval and adult morphology; molecular markers; evolutionary biology of weevils and other phytophagous beetles
Guest Editor
Dr. Chris Lyal

The Natural History Museum, London, Department of Life Science, London, United Kingdom
Website | E-Mail
Interests: weevil systematics; phylogeny and nomenclature; weevil adult morphology; weevil host associations; seed predation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Weevils, beetles of the superfamily Curculionoidea, constitute an extremely diverse branch of the tree of life. About 62,000 species in 5800 genera have been described, but it is estimated that about three times as many exist. The great majority of weevils are phytophagous in both the larval and adult stages, and while their huge diversity is intricately linked to that of the flowering plants (angiosperms), virtually all vascular plants and all plant parts serve as host to one or more species of weevils. Several weevils are serious pests of agriculture and forest industry, whereas others are highly beneficial as biological control agents of weeds or as pollinators of a variety of plants.

Both basic and applied research on weevils is crucially informed by results of systematic and phylogenetic studies, which are fundamental for developing stable and predictive classifications and for posing and testing hypotheses about the evolutionary success of weevils. While recent phylogenetic studies have largely succeeded in reconstructing a robust phylogenetic backbone and stable family-level classification of Curculionoidea, much remains to be done in terms of identifying natural groups and relationships within these families. Further study is also needed in fields such as comparative morphology, biogeography and patterns of host associations.

The forthcoming Special Issue aims to provide an overview of, and new insights into, current hypotheses on weevil systematics, phylogeny, evolution, biogeography, host associations and morphology. We welcome papers presenting meaningful contributions to these and related topics.

This Special Issue also serves as a memorial to Dr. Guillermo (Willy) Kuschel (1918–2017), in recognition of his long and enormous contribution to weevil systematics and phylogeny.

Dr. Rolf  Oberprieler
Dr. Adriana Marvaldi
Dr. Chris Lyal
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • weevil systematics
  • weevil phylogeny (morphological and molecular)
  • weevil evolution and fossil history
  • weevil biology (plant associations)
  • weevil morphology
  • weevil biogeography

Published Papers (27 papers)

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Open AccessArticle A Tribute to Guillermo (Willy) Kuschel (1918–2017)
Diversity 2018, 10(3), 101; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10030101
Received: 10 August 2018 / Revised: 12 September 2018 / Accepted: 12 September 2018 / Published: 14 September 2018
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Abstract
This tribute commemorates the life and work of Guillermo (Willy) Kuschel, who made substantial contributions to the understanding of weevil systematics, evolution and biology. Willy was born in Chile in 1918 and studied philosophy, theology and biology. He became fascinated by weevils early
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This tribute commemorates the life and work of Guillermo (Willy) Kuschel, who made substantial contributions to the understanding of weevil systematics, evolution and biology. Willy was born in Chile in 1918 and studied philosophy, theology and biology. He became fascinated by weevils early on and completed his Ph.D. degree on South American Erirhinini. Subsequent employment by the University of Chile provided him with many opportunities to further his weevil research and undertake numerous collecting expeditions, including to remote and rugged locations such as the Juan Fernandez Islands and southern Chile. In 1963 he accepted a position at the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research in New Zealand, where he became Head of the Systematics Group in the Entomology Division. His emphasis on field work and collections led to the establishment of the New Zealand Arthropod Collection, which he guided through its greatest period of expansion. His retirement in 1983 offered him increased opportunities to pursue his weevil research. In 1988 he presented a new scheme of the higher classification of weevils, which ignited and inspired much subsequent research into weevil systematics. The breadth and quality of his research and his huge collecting efforts have left a legacy that will benefit future entomologists, especially weevil workers, for decades to come. This tribute presents a biography of Willy and accounts of his contributions to, and impact on, the systematics of weevils both regionally and globally. All of his publications and the genera and species named after him are listed in two appendices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Systematics and Phylogeny of Weevils)
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Open AccessArticle A Combined Molecular and Morphological Approach to Explore the Higher Phylogeny of Entimine Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), with Special Reference to South American Taxa
Diversity 2018, 10(3), 95; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10030095
Received: 1 August 2018 / Revised: 17 August 2018 / Accepted: 20 August 2018 / Published: 23 August 2018
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Abstract
The Entiminae are broad-nosed weevils constituting the most diverse subfamily of Curculionidae, with over 50 tribes. We performed Bayesian and Maximum Parsimony combined phylogenetic analyses with the main objective of testing higher-level relationships and the naturalness of the major Neotropical and Southern South
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The Entiminae are broad-nosed weevils constituting the most diverse subfamily of Curculionidae, with over 50 tribes. We performed Bayesian and Maximum Parsimony combined phylogenetic analyses with the main objective of testing higher-level relationships and the naturalness of the major Neotropical and Southern South American (Patagonia and Andes) tribes, including some members from other regions. We compiled a data matrix of 67 terminal units with 63 Entiminae species, as well as four outgroup taxa from Cyclominae, by 3522 molecular (from nuclear 18S rDNA and 28S rDNA, and mitochondrial 16S rDNA and COI gene sequences) and 70 morphological characters. The resulting trees recover a clade Entiminae with a monophyletic Cylydrorhinini and Premnotrypes branching off early. The tree resulting from parsimony analysis shows a clade of Leptopiini from the Australian region and another clade including taxa mainly distributed in the Palaearctic and Neotropical regions, but in the Bayesian tree the South American and Australian Leptopiini are grouped together. The mainly Palaearctic Entiminae (e.g., Brachyderini, Laparocerini, Otiorhynchini, Peritelini, Polydrusini, Phyllobiini and Sciaphylini) form a subclade separated from Southern Hemisphere taxa. Among the latter, the well-supported Naupactini are the sister group of the South American Tanymecini, excluding Platyaspistes, herein transferred to Leptopiini (new placement). Another well-justified clade is Eustylini–Geonemini, which also includes the enigmatic Galapagonotus, and the genus Artipus, thus corroborating its recent exclusion from Naupactini. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Systematics and Phylogeny of Weevils)
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Open AccessCommunication Validation of the Names of Three Weevil Species Described by Borovec et al., The Enigmatic Weevil Genus Philetaerobius from Southern Africa: Definition, Affinities and Description of Three New Species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Entiminae); Diversity, 2018, 10, 30
Diversity 2018, 10(3), 93; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10030093
Received: 27 July 2018 / Revised: 10 August 2018 / Accepted: 10 August 2018 / Published: 14 August 2018
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Abstract
Three new species of the small entimine genus Philetaerobius Marshall, 1923 from southern Africa are described, P. endroedyi sp. n., P. garibebi sp. n. and P. louwi sp. n., with bibliographic reference to fuller descriptions and illustrations in the recent paper by Borovec
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Three new species of the small entimine genus Philetaerobius Marshall, 1923 from southern Africa are described, P. endroedyi sp. n., P. garibebi sp. n. and P. louwi sp. n., with bibliographic reference to fuller descriptions and illustrations in the recent paper by Borovec et al. (2018) published in the journal Diversity 10 (2), 30, in which the names were not made available under the rules of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature dealing with electronic publication. A lectotype is also here designated for P. nidicola Marshall, 1923. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Systematics and Phylogeny of Weevils)
Open AccessArticle The Genus Urodontidius Louw (Anthribidae: Urodontinae) Rediscovered and Its Biological Secrets Revealed: A Tribute to Schalk Louw (1952–2018)
Diversity 2018, 10(3), 92; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10030092
Received: 9 July 2018 / Revised: 10 August 2018 / Accepted: 11 August 2018 / Published: 14 August 2018
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Abstract
The paper records the rediscovery of the rare Urodontidius enigmaticus Louw, 1993 in South Africa, based on specimens reared from galls in the succulent leaves of Ruschia versicolor. The original account of some of the morphological characters of the species is corrected,
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The paper records the rediscovery of the rare Urodontidius enigmaticus Louw, 1993 in South Africa, based on specimens reared from galls in the succulent leaves of Ruschia versicolor. The original account of some of the morphological characters of the species is corrected, and its habitus, antennae, pygidium and genitalia are illustrated. Its life history and galling habit on its host plant are described and illustrated, and its larva is compared with those of the genera Urodontellus Louw and Urodontus Louw, which represent different larval types with different life histories. The silk-spinning habits of the Urodontellus larva are briefly described. A tribute to the late Schalk Louw is presented, together with a list of his publications on weevils. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Systematics and Phylogeny of Weevils)
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Open AccessArticle The Molecular Phylogeny of the New Zealand Endemic Genus Hadramphus and the Revival of the Genus Karocolens
Diversity 2018, 10(3), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10030088
Received: 26 June 2018 / Revised: 9 August 2018 / Accepted: 10 August 2018 / Published: 13 August 2018
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Abstract
The delineation of species is important to the fields of evolution, ecology and conservation. The use of only a single line of evidence, e.g., morphology or a single gene sequence, may underestimate or overestimate the level of diversity within a taxon. This problem
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The delineation of species is important to the fields of evolution, ecology and conservation. The use of only a single line of evidence, e.g., morphology or a single gene sequence, may underestimate or overestimate the level of diversity within a taxon. This problem often occurs when organisms are morphologically similar but genetically different, i.e., for cryptic species. The Hadramphus genus contains four endangered, morphologically similar species of weevils, each endemic to a specific New Zealand region (Hadramphus spinipennis Chatham Islands, H. stilbocarpae Fiordland, H. tuberculatus McKenzie Country, H. pittospori Poor Knights Islands). The systematic relationships among these species are unclear. We used samples from these species and a closely related genus, Lyperobius huttoni, to obtain data from the mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase subunit I and the nuclear gene internal transcribe spacer 2. In addition to the multi-locus coalescent approach, we modelled morphological characteristics combined with the genetic data. We found that H. spinipennis, H. tuberculatus and H. stilbocarpae were a closely related clade. Despite a strong morphological similarity, Hadramphus pittospori was found to be genetically distinct from the other Hadramphus species, which supports the resurrection of the monotypic genus Karocolens for this species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Systematics and Phylogeny of Weevils)
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Open AccessCommunication Validation of the Names of Two Weevil Species Described by Skuhrovec et al., Review of Cape Verde Aphanommata Wollaston, 1873 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Cossoninae) with Description of New Species, Larva and Notes on Biology and Distributional Patterns; Diversity 2018, 10, 28
Diversity 2018, 10(3), 87; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10030087
Received: 31 July 2018 / Revised: 6 August 2018 / Accepted: 8 August 2018 / Published: 10 August 2018
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Abstract
Two new species of the cossonine genus Aphanommata Wollaston, 1873 from Cape Verde are described, Aphanommata kuscheli sp. n. and Aphanommata strakai sp. n, with bibliographic reference to fuller descriptions and illustrations in the recent paper by Skuhrovec et al. (2018) published in
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Two new species of the cossonine genus Aphanommata Wollaston, 1873 from Cape Verde are described, Aphanommata kuscheli sp. n. and Aphanommata strakai sp. n, with bibliographic reference to fuller descriptions and illustrations in the recent paper by Skuhrovec et al. (2018) published in the journal Diversity 10 (2), 28, in which the names were not made available under the rules of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature dealing with electronic publication. A lectotype is also here designated for Rhyncolus euphorbiarum Wollaston, 1867, currently assigned to the genus Aphanommata. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Systematics and Phylogeny of Weevils)
Open AccessCommunication Validation of the Names of Four Weevil Species Described by Caldara & Košťál, Description of Four New Species of the Afrotropical Weevil Genus Afroryzophilus (Coleoptera, Curculionidae); Diversity 2018, 10, 37
Diversity 2018, 10(3), 86; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10030086
Received: 31 July 2018 / Revised: 3 August 2018 / Accepted: 6 August 2018 / Published: 9 August 2018
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Abstract
Four new species of the erirhinine genus Afroryzophilus Lyal, 1990 from Africa are described, A. centrafricanus sp. n., A. congoanus sp. n., A. kuscheli sp. n. and A. somalicus sp. n., with bibliographic reference to fuller descriptions and illustrations in
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Four new species of the erirhinine genus Afroryzophilus Lyal, 1990 from Africa are described, A. centrafricanus sp. n., A. congoanus sp. n., A. kuscheli sp. n. and A. somalicus sp. n., with bibliographic reference to fuller descriptions and illustrations in the recent paper by Caldara & Košťál (2018) published in the journal Diversity 10 (2), 37, in which the names were not made available under the rules of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature dealing with electronic publication. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Systematics and Phylogeny of Weevils)
Open AccessArticle A Review of Philenis Champion, 1906 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Conoderinae), with Descriptions of New Species from Central and South America
Diversity 2018, 10(3), 84; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10030084
Received: 30 June 2018 / Revised: 19 July 2018 / Accepted: 23 July 2018 / Published: 8 August 2018
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Abstract
A brief review of the history of the taxonomic treatment of the genus Philenis Champion is presented and characters are discussed. Philenis flavipes Champion and P. fuscofemorata Champion, and 11 new species are described, including the first records from South America: P. anzaldoi
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A brief review of the history of the taxonomic treatment of the genus Philenis Champion is presented and characters are discussed. Philenis flavipes Champion and P. fuscofemorata Champion, and 11 new species are described, including the first records from South America: P. anzaldoi new species (Costa Rica, Panamá), P. costaricensis new species (Costa Rica), P. laselvaensis new species (Costa Rica), P. auritibiae new species (Costa Rica), P. brunnea new species (Costa Rica, Panamá), P. muscamimetica new species (Panamá), P. chiriquiensis new species (Panamá), P. guyanensis new species (French Guiana), P. ferruginea new species (Ecuador), P. howdeni new species (Ecuador), and P. kuscheli new species (Colombia, Ecuador). A key is provided to separate the species, and an unusual type of “multifurcate” scale is reported for some species. Two species have been associated with plants of the family Araceae. Most collections of this genus by the Arthropods of La Selva (ALAS) biodiversity project in Costa Rica were made by passive trapping methods during the dry season and at lower to middle elevations along an altitudinal transect on the slopes of Volcan Barva. The coloration of some species in the genus is hypothesized to mimic social Hymenoptera or flies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Systematics and Phylogeny of Weevils)
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Open AccessCommunication Validation of the Names of Five Weevil Taxa Described by Anderson et al., A Review of the Araucaria-Associated Weevils of the Tribe Orthorhinini (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Molytinae), with Description of New Species of Ilacuris Pascoe, 1865 and Notopissodes Zimmerman & Oberprieler, 2014 and a New Genus, Kuschelorhinus Anderson & Setliff; Diversity, 2018, 10, 54
Diversity 2018, 10(3), 83; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10030083
Received: 26 July 2018 / Revised: 1 August 2018 / Accepted: 3 August 2018 / Published: 7 August 2018
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Abstract
One new genus and four new species of the Orthorhinini from Australia and Papua New Guinea are described, with bibliographic reference to complete descriptions and illustrations in the recent paper by Anderson et al. (2018) published in the journal Diversity 10 (3), 54,
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One new genus and four new species of the Orthorhinini from Australia and Papua New Guinea are described, with bibliographic reference to complete descriptions and illustrations in the recent paper by Anderson et al. (2018) published in the journal Diversity 10 (3), 54, in which the names were not made available under the rules of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature dealing with electronic publication, as follows: Ilacuris papuana Anderson & Setliff, sp. n., Ilacuris suttoni Anderson & Setliff, sp. n., Notopissodes variegatus Oberprieler, sp. n., Kuschelorhinus Anderson & Setliff, gen. n. and Kuschelorhinus hirsutus Anderson & Setliff, sp. n. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Systematics and Phylogeny of Weevils)
Open AccessArticle Anchonini in Africa: New Species and Genus Confirming a Transatlantic Distribution (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Molytinae)
Diversity 2018, 10(3), 82; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10030082
Received: 15 June 2018 / Revised: 20 July 2018 / Accepted: 23 July 2018 / Published: 6 August 2018
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Abstract
The Anchonini known from Africa are reviewed. The monotypic genus Aethiopacorep is redescribed. The new West African genus Titilayo gen. nov. is described, with seven new species: four from São Tomé, T. perrinae sp. nov., T. saotomense sp. nov., T. barclayi sp. nov.,
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The Anchonini known from Africa are reviewed. The monotypic genus Aethiopacorep is redescribed. The new West African genus Titilayo gen. nov. is described, with seven new species: four from São Tomé, T. perrinae sp. nov., T. saotomense sp. nov., T. barclayi sp. nov., and T. turneri sp. nov.; two from Ivory Coast, T. geiseri sp. nov. and T. garnerae sp. nov.; and one from Sierra Leone, T. takanoi sp. nov. Neither of these genera is known outside West Africa. A neotype is designated for Anchonus africanus Hustache 1932. A key to the two African genera, Aethiopacorep and Titilayo, as well as their corresponding species, is provided. This work provides the first records of Anchonini for mainland Africa; this group is still understudied in the region but shows signs of being very diverse on both the mainland and in the western African islands. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Systematics and Phylogeny of Weevils)
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Open AccessArticle Review of the Hygrophilous Weevils in Israel (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea)
Diversity 2018, 10(3), 77; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10030077
Received: 20 June 2018 / Revised: 24 July 2018 / Accepted: 26 July 2018 / Published: 31 July 2018
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Abstract
Forty-one species in 20 genera of hygrophilous weevils belonging to Brentidae and Curculionidae, associated with inland aquatic habitats, have been recorded recently from Israel, eight of them for the first time. Thirty-four species are extant, while five species have probably become extinct recently,
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Forty-one species in 20 genera of hygrophilous weevils belonging to Brentidae and Curculionidae, associated with inland aquatic habitats, have been recorded recently from Israel, eight of them for the first time. Thirty-four species are extant, while five species have probably become extinct recently, and two are fossil species, known from Late Cretaceous deposits. Sixteen species are either aquatic or semi-aquatic, while the rest occur only or predominantly on riparian vegetation. Distributional and biological data for most of the species are provided. A key to all hygrophilous weevil taxa and illustrations for most of the species are provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Systematics and Phylogeny of Weevils)
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Open AccessArticle Kuschelysius, a New Alpine Genus of Eugnomine Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Curculioninae) from New Zealand
Diversity 2018, 10(3), 75; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10030075
Received: 27 June 2018 / Revised: 22 July 2018 / Accepted: 24 July 2018 / Published: 27 July 2018
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Abstract
Kuschelysius new genus is described for four species, K. hollowayae new species, K. durus new species, K. verbalis new species and K. nitens new species, which are found in alpine regions along the length of the South Island of New
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Kuschelysius new genus is described for four species, K. hollowayae new species, K. durus new species, K. verbalis new species and K. nitens new species, which are found in alpine regions along the length of the South Island of New Zealand. The genus most closely resembles members of the genus Eugnomus but is distinguished from them by the presence of a small pair of post-ocular tubercles and by having appressed scales on the dorsal surfaces. Some members of Kuschelysius appear to be flight-capable with well-developed hindwings, while others have reduced hindwings and are presumably flightless. Many specimens have been collected from the flowers of Dracophyllum traversii, Celmisia and other alpine plants, and the guts of examined specimens contained pollen. We hypothesise that the species of Kuschelysius are pollinators of the New Zealand alpine flora. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Systematics and Phylogeny of Weevils)
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Open AccessArticle The Problematic Genus Sclerocardius (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Molytinae: Ithyporini)
Diversity 2018, 10(3), 74; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10030074
Received: 7 July 2018 / Revised: 19 July 2018 / Accepted: 20 July 2018 / Published: 26 July 2018
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Abstract
The genus Sclerocardius is revised, using morphological characters. Four species are recognized, including S. africanus (Boheman), S. bohemani Schoenherr stat.rev., S. indicus Hartmann and S. kuscheli sp.nov. The species Sclerocardius madecassus Ferragu is synonymized with S. bohemani syn.nov., and Charactocnemus hintzi Hartmann is
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The genus Sclerocardius is revised, using morphological characters. Four species are recognized, including S. africanus (Boheman), S. bohemani Schoenherr stat.rev., S. indicus Hartmann and S. kuscheli sp.nov. The species Sclerocardius madecassus Ferragu is synonymized with S. bohemani syn.nov., and Charactocnemus hintzi Hartmann is treated as a junior synonym of S. bohemani, not S. africanus. A key to species is given. Lectotypes are designated for Heteramphus africanus Boheman and Sclerocardius africanus Schoenherr. A female elytro-tergal stridulatory system involving the modification of the wing-binding patch of the seventh tergite is reported for the Sclerocardiina for the first time and supports the inclusion of the subtribe within the Ithyporini. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Systematics and Phylogeny of Weevils)
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Open AccessArticle Weevils as Targets for Biological Control, and the Importance of Taxonomy and Phylogeny for Efficacy and Biosafety
Diversity 2018, 10(3), 73; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10030073
Received: 3 July 2018 / Revised: 20 July 2018 / Accepted: 21 July 2018 / Published: 25 July 2018
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Abstract
Curculionidae are a large mainly herbivorous family of beetles, some of which have become crop pests. Classical biological control has been attempted for about 38 species in 19 genera, and at least moderate success has been achieved in 31 % of cases. Only
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Curculionidae are a large mainly herbivorous family of beetles, some of which have become crop pests. Classical biological control has been attempted for about 38 species in 19 genera, and at least moderate success has been achieved in 31 % of cases. Only two weevil species have been considered to be completely controlled by a biological control agent. Success depends upon accurately matching natural enemies with their hosts, and hence taxonomy and phylogeny play a critical role. These factors are discussed and illustrated with two case studies: the introduction of the braconid parasitoid Mictroctonus aethiopoides into New Zealand for biological control of the lucerne pest Sitona discoideus, a case of complex phylogenetic relationships that challenged the prediction of potential non-target hosts, and the use of a mymarid egg parasitoid, Anaphes nitens, to control species of the eucalypt weevil genus Gonipterus, which involves failure to match up parasitoids with the right target amongst a complex of very closely related species. We discuss the increasing importance of molecular methods to support biological control programmes and the essential role of these emerging technologies for improving our understanding of this very large and complex family. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Systematics and Phylogeny of Weevils)
Open AccessArticle A Review of the Tribe Cryptoplini (Coleoptera: Curculioninae), with Revision of the Genus Menechirus Hartmann, 1901 and Description of a New Genus Associated with Macadamia
Diversity 2018, 10(3), 71; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10030071
Received: 6 June 2018 / Revised: 11 July 2018 / Accepted: 15 July 2018 / Published: 23 July 2018
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Abstract
This paper presents the results of a study that was largely initiated to describe a genus and species of weevil damaging macadamia fruits in plantations in New South Wales and Queensland, Australia. This taxon is described as Kuschelorhynchus macadamiae gen. et sp. n.,
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This paper presents the results of a study that was largely initiated to describe a genus and species of weevil damaging macadamia fruits in plantations in New South Wales and Queensland, Australia. This taxon is described as Kuschelorhynchus macadamiae gen. et sp. n., the genus named in honour of the late Guillermo (Willy) Kuschel (1918–2017). The related genus Menechirus Hartmann is also revised, resulting in the description of three new species, M. howdenae sp. n., M. parryi sp. n. and M. mundus sp. n. The other genera of the small Australian weevil tribe Cryptoplini, Cryptoplus Erichson, Haplonyx Schoenherr, Sigastus Pascoe and Zeopus Pascoe, are diagnosed and their host associations summarised, and a revised diagnosis of the tribe Cryptoplini is presented, together with a key to its six genera. The extraordinary aedeagus of Cryptoplini, featuring a tectal plate as is characteristic of more primitive weevils, is discussed and illustrated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Systematics and Phylogeny of Weevils)
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Open AccessArticle Phylogeny of the Genus Dichotrachelus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Cyclominae)
Diversity 2018, 10(3), 66; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10030066
Received: 7 May 2018 / Revised: 5 July 2018 / Accepted: 5 July 2018 / Published: 18 July 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (4326 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
A phylogenetic analysis of the genus Dichotrachelus (Curculionidae: Cyclominae) was carried out, based on a morphological matrix and, for some species, on mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I sequences. Bayesian Inference, Maximum Likelihood and Maximum Parsimony were implemented and the results were compared. The genus
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A phylogenetic analysis of the genus Dichotrachelus (Curculionidae: Cyclominae) was carried out, based on a morphological matrix and, for some species, on mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I sequences. Bayesian Inference, Maximum Likelihood and Maximum Parsimony were implemented and the results were compared. The genus is found to be isolated in the subfamily, not related to the only other Palaearctic tribe (Hipporhinini) and possibly nearer to the south-American genera of Cyclominae of the tribe Listroderini. Among these, Macrostyphlus is also equally associated to mosses as the host plant. In Dichotrachelus, two main clades were recognized, one distributed in the western part of the Mediterranean region (Iberian Peninsula, northern Africa and southern France) and the second distributed in the Alps and Apennines. Within each clade, some differentiated monophyletic subgroups could be identified. An evaluation of the most important characters that led to the phylogenetic reconstruction indicated the male genital sclerite as the most useful structure to characterize the different clades. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Systematics and Phylogeny of Weevils)
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Open AccessArticle Molecular and Morphological Phylogenetic Analysis of Naupactus Dejean (Curculionidae: Entiminae) and Allied Genera: The Dilemma of Classification
Diversity 2018, 10(3), 59; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10030059
Received: 31 May 2018 / Revised: 30 June 2018 / Accepted: 5 July 2018 / Published: 10 July 2018
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Abstract
Naupactus (Curculionidae: Entiminae) is the most speciose weevil genus of the tribe Naupactini. The main objective of this work is to recognize species groups within Naupactus and to analyze the relationships between this and other Neotropical genera. For this purpose, we compiled a
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Naupactus (Curculionidae: Entiminae) is the most speciose weevil genus of the tribe Naupactini. The main objective of this work is to recognize species groups within Naupactus and to analyze the relationships between this and other Neotropical genera. For this purpose, we compiled a combined data matrix of 60 terminal units corresponding to 40 species for which we recorded 812 molecular and morphological characters (763 and 49 respectively), which were analyzed by Maximum Parsimony and Bayesian analyses. The single tree obtained from each analysis was rooted with Cyrtomon inhalatus. The species of Naupactus were recovered as different monophyletic groups, some of them closer to other genera of Naupactini (Lanterius, Teratopactus, Pantomorus and Parapantomorus) than to species of the same genus. We conclude that Naupactus is non-monophyletic, even though most species can be recognized based on a particular combination of morphological characters, which are probably symplesiomorphic. To be consistent with the cladistic principles, some genera diversified in marginal areas of the Pantomorus-Naupactus complex should be synonymized with Naupactus; however, these nomenclatural changes may not ensure a generic definition based on synapomorphies. We prefer to be conservative about the current classification until more evidence is available. The only nomenclatural amendments proposed herein are the transference of Naupactus inermis Hustache to Lanterius and of N. setarius to Symmathetes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Systematics and Phylogeny of Weevils)
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Open AccessArticle A Review of the Araucaria-Associated Weevils of the Tribe Orthorhinini (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Molytinae), with Description of New Species of Ilacuris Pascoe, 1865 and Notopissodes Zimmerman & Oberprieler, 2014 and a New Genus, Kuschelorhinus Anderson & Setliff
Diversity 2018, 10(3), 54; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10030054
Received: 1 June 2018 / Revised: 21 June 2018 / Accepted: 26 June 2018 / Published: 4 July 2018
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The Araucaria-associated weevils of the tribe Orthorhinini are reviewed, namely the genera Eurhamphus Shuckard, 1838; Ilacuris Pascoe, 1865; Imbilius Marshall, 1938; Notopissodes Zimmerman & Oberprieler, 2014 and Vanapa Pouillaude, 1915. The genus Ilacuris is revised with three species recognized: I. laticollis Pascoe,
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The Araucaria-associated weevils of the tribe Orthorhinini are reviewed, namely the genera Eurhamphus Shuckard, 1838; Ilacuris Pascoe, 1865; Imbilius Marshall, 1938; Notopissodes Zimmerman & Oberprieler, 2014 and Vanapa Pouillaude, 1915. The genus Ilacuris is revised with three species recognized: I. laticollis Pascoe, 1865 and I. suttoni Anderson & Setliff, new species from Australia, and I. papuana Anderson & Setliff, new species from Papua New Guinea. A second species of Notopissodes, N. variegatus Oberprieler, new species from Australia, is also described. Lastly, Kuschelorhinus hirsutus Anderson & Setliff, new genus and new species, is described from Papua New Guinea. The new genus is a close relative of Ilacuris and it is named in honor of our esteemed late colleague, Guillermo ‘Willy’ Kuschel (1918–2017), recognizing his interest in Araucaria-associated Coleoptera. Habitus images, natural history information and a key to the Araucaria-associated Orthorhinini are presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Systematics and Phylogeny of Weevils)
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Open AccessArticle Invasive Bark Beetles (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Scolytinae) in Chile and Argentina, Including Two Species New for South America, and the Correct Identity of the Orthotomicus Species in Chile and Argentina
Diversity 2018, 10(2), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10020040
Received: 6 April 2018 / Revised: 10 May 2018 / Accepted: 16 May 2018 / Published: 25 May 2018
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Abstract
The rate of establishment of non-native bark beetle species is accelerating in many parts of the world and is considered a serious threat to forests and forest crops. Distributional data for exotic bark beetles are urgently needed, but they must be based on
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The rate of establishment of non-native bark beetle species is accelerating in many parts of the world and is considered a serious threat to forests and forest crops. Distributional data for exotic bark beetles are urgently needed, but they must be based on sound taxonomy. Using primary literature and original records, I review for the first time the invasive bark beetle (Scolytinae) species in Chile and Argentina, and I give a short risk assessment for each. I also provide the best sources for identifying these species. The invasive pine bark beetle commonly referred to in Chilean research as Orthotomicus erosus (Wollaston) is not that species: evidence suggests that the only Orthotomicus that is or has been in Chile is O. laricis (Fabricius), which is also the Orthotomicus species reported in the most recent research from Argentina. I add new information on the distributions of two other abundant pine-breeding invasive species, Hylurgus ligniperda (F.) and Hylastes ater (Paykull), and I report that populations of Hylastes linearis Erichson have been found in Chile. This is the first known occurrence of the species in South America. Phloeotribus willei Schedl, a tiny bark beetle collected from domestic fig trees in Chile and Peru, has been considered native heretofore. I argue that it must be an introduced Neotropical species, and I present new localities for Chile. I present the first Chilean records of the Myrtaceae specialist ambrosia beetle Amasa truncata (Erichson), an Australian species recently found in southern Brazil and northeastern Uruguay, and new Argentinian records that seem to be the earliest finds of Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motschulsky) in South America. The Canary Island palm seed specialist Dactylotrypes longicollis (Wollaston) is reported for the first time from South America, from Chile. The presence in Chile of another spermatophage, Coccotrypes dactyliperda (F.), is confirmed. New Chilean regions and new host records are given for Pagiocerus frontalis (F.), a species that breeds in Lauraceae seeds but also in stored maize. Other exotic species treated briefly include Hylastinus obscurus (Marsham), Hylesinus taranio (Danthione), Scolytus multistriatus (Marsham), S. rugulosus (Müller), Coccotrypes cyperi (Beeson), and Xyleborinus saxeseni (Ratzeburg). Finally, reports of several species from Chile or Argentina are considered unsupported by evidence: Scolytus kirschii Skalitzky, Pityokteines curvidens (Germar), Coccotrypes robustus Eichhoff, and Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari).
La velocidad de establecimiento de especies de coleópteros descortezadores no nativos se está acelerando en muchas partes del mundo y se considera una amenaza seria a bosques y cultivos forestales. Se requiere datos distribucionales urgentemente, pero estos tienen que basarse en taxonomía sólida. Utilizando literatura primaria y registros originales, reviso por primera vez la fauna invasora de especies de descortezadores (Scolytinae) en Chile y Argentina, y ofrezco una evaluación breve del riesgo de cada una. También proporciono los mejores referencias para identificar estas especies. La especie descortezador invasora de pinos comunmente citado en investigaciones chilenas como Orthotomicus erosus (Wollaston) no es esa: la evidencia sugiere que la única especie de Orthotomicus actualmente o históricamente presente en Chile es O. laricis (Fabricius), la cual es la especie de Orthotomicus reportado en las investigaciones mas recientes de Argentina. Agrego información nueva sobre las distribuciones de otros dos especies abundantes invasoras que se reproducen en pinos, Hylurgus ligniperda (F.) y Hylastes ater (Paykull) y comunico que poblaciones de Hylastes linearis Erichson se han encontrado en Chile, siendo esta el primer hallazgo de la especie en Sudamérica. Phloeotribus willei Schedl, una especie minúscula colectado de higueras cultivadas en Chile y Peru, se ha considerado nativa hasta ahora: presento argumentos que debe de ser una especie neotropical introducida y presento nuevas localidades para Chile. Presento los primeros registros chilenos de Amasa truncata (Erichson) coleóptero ambrosial, especialista en Myrtaceae, especie australiana recientemente encontrada en el sur de Brasil y nordeste de Uruguay, y nuevos registros argentinos que parecen ser los primeros hallazgos de Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motschulsky) en Sudamérica. Se registra la especialista en semillas de palma, Dactylotrypes longicollis (Wollaston), originario de las Islas Canárias pro primera vez de Sudamérica; se confirma la presencia en Chile de otra espermatófago, Coccotrypes dactyliperda (F.). Se presentan nuevos registros regionales de Chile y de hospederas por Pagiocerus frontalis (F.), especie que se reproduce en semillas de Lauraceae pero también en maíz almacenado. Otras especies exóticas tratadas brevemente incluyen Hylastinus obscurus (Marsham), Hylesinus taranio (Danthione), Scolytus multistriatus (Marsham), S. rugulosus (Müller), Coccotrypes cyperi (Beeson), y Xyleborinus saxeseni (Ratzeburg). Finalmente, registros de varias especies de Chile o de Argentina se consideran sin apoyo de evidencia: Scolytus kirschii Skalitzky, Pityokteines curvidens (Germar), Coccotrypes robustus Eichhoff, y Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Systematics and Phylogeny of Weevils)
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Open AccessArticle Molecular and Morphological Phylogenetic Analyses of New World Cycad Beetles: What They Reveal about Cycad Evolution in the New World
Diversity 2018, 10(2), 38; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10020038
Received: 8 March 2018 / Revised: 16 May 2018 / Accepted: 17 May 2018 / Published: 23 May 2018
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Abstract
Two major lineages of beetles inhabit cycad cones in the New World: weevils (Curculionoidea) in the subtribe Allocorynina, including the genera Notorhopalotria Tang and O’Brien, Parallocorynus Voss, Protocorynus O’Brien and Tang and Rhopalotria Chevrolat, and beetles in the family Erotylidae, including the genus
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Two major lineages of beetles inhabit cycad cones in the New World: weevils (Curculionoidea) in the subtribe Allocorynina, including the genera Notorhopalotria Tang and O’Brien, Parallocorynus Voss, Protocorynus O’Brien and Tang and Rhopalotria Chevrolat, and beetles in the family Erotylidae, including the genus Pharaxonotha Reitter. Analysis of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) mitochondrial gene as well as cladistic analysis of morphological characters of the weevils indicate four major radiations, with a probable origin on the cycad genus Dioon Lindl. and comparatively recent host shifts onto Zamia L. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene for erotylid beetles indicates that an undescribed genus restricted to New World Ceratozamia Brongn. is the most early-diverging clade, and this lineage is sister to a large radiation of the genus Pharaxonotha onto Zamia, with apparent host shifts onto Dioon and Ceratozamia. Analysis of beetles are in accord with current models of continental drift in the Caribbean basin, support some proposed species groupings of cycads, but not others, and suggest that pollinator type may impact population genetic structure in their host cycads. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Systematics and Phylogeny of Weevils)
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Open AccessArticle Description of Four New Species of the Afrotropical Weevil Genus Afroryzophilus (Coleoptera, Curculionidae)
Diversity 2018, 10(2), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10020037
Received: 2 April 2018 / Revised: 16 May 2018 / Accepted: 17 May 2018 / Published: 23 May 2018
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Abstract
Four new species belonging to the Afrotropical weevil genus Afroryzophilus Lyal, 1990 (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Brachycerinae, Tanysphyrini) are described: A. centrafricanus n. sp. (Central African Republic), A. congoanus n. sp. (Democratic Republic of the Congo), A. kuscheli n. sp. (Senegal), and A. somalicus n.
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Four new species belonging to the Afrotropical weevil genus Afroryzophilus Lyal, 1990 (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Brachycerinae, Tanysphyrini) are described: A. centrafricanus n. sp. (Central African Republic), A. congoanus n. sp. (Democratic Republic of the Congo), A. kuscheli n. sp. (Senegal), and A. somalicus n. sp. (Somalia). Previously, this genus was monotypic, based only on A. djibai Lyal, 1990 from Senegal. The five species of this genus are very similar to each other in external morphology, varying only in the width of the forehead and that of the third tarsomere, the length of the fifth tarsomere and the pattern of dorsal seta-like scales. However, the male genitalia show clear interspecific differences. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Systematics and Phylogeny of Weevils)
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Open AccessArticle On the Phylogenetic Position of the Weevil Tribe Acentrusini Alonso-Zarazaga, 2005 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Curculioninae)
Diversity 2018, 10(2), 34; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10020034
Received: 26 March 2018 / Revised: 1 May 2018 / Accepted: 4 May 2018 / Published: 7 May 2018
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Abstract
Based on intrinsic morphological and extrinsic bionomic characters, the systematic position of the weevil tribe Acentrusini Alonso-Zarazaga, 2005 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Curculioninae) was determined. Maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference as well as nonmetric multi-dimensional scaling were used to analyze 34 morphological characters of adults,
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Based on intrinsic morphological and extrinsic bionomic characters, the systematic position of the weevil tribe Acentrusini Alonso-Zarazaga, 2005 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Curculioninae) was determined. Maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference as well as nonmetric multi-dimensional scaling were used to analyze 34 morphological characters of adults, complemented by four host plant characters associated with particular weevil tribes. Sixteen species belonging to two subfamilies (Brachycerinae, Curculionidae) and seven tribes (Acentrusini, Anthonomini, Ellescini, Erirhinini, Smicronychini, Storeini, Styphlini) of the family Curculionidae and one outgroup species (Attelabidae) were studied. Phylogenetic and multi-dimensional analyses revealed the tribe Smicronychini as most closely related to Acentrusini. Of the tribes of Curculioninae studied, Styphlini, Anthonomini and Ellescini showed a certain degree of phylogenetic relation to Acentrusini, whereas Storeini were found to be least related. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Systematics and Phylogeny of Weevils)
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Open AccessArticle Unveiling the History of a Peculiar Weevil-Plant Interaction in South America: A Phylogeographic Approach to Hydnorobius hydnorae (Belidae) Associated with Prosopanche americana (Aristolochiaceae)
Diversity 2018, 10(2), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10020033
Received: 28 March 2018 / Revised: 1 May 2018 / Accepted: 4 May 2018 / Published: 6 May 2018
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Abstract
Interspecific interactions take place over both long and short time-frames. However, it is not completely understood if the interacting-partners persisted, migrated, or expanded in concert with Quaternary climate and landscape changes. We aim to understand whether there is concordance between the specialist weevil
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Interspecific interactions take place over both long and short time-frames. However, it is not completely understood if the interacting-partners persisted, migrated, or expanded in concert with Quaternary climate and landscape changes. We aim to understand whether there is concordance between the specialist weevil Hydnorobius hydnorae and its parasitic host plant, Prosopanche americana in space and time. We aim to determine whether Prosopanche had already established its range, and Hydnorobius later actively colonized this rare resource; or, if both host plant and herbivore expanded their range concomitantly. We performed population genetic, phylogeographic and Bayesian diffusion analysis of Cytochrome B sequences from 18 weevil localities and used paleodistribution models to infer host plant dispersal patterns. We found strong but uneven population structure across the range for H. hydnorae with weak signals of population growth, and haplotype network structure and SAMOVA groupings closely following biogeographic region boundaries. The ancestral areas for both Hydnorobius and Prosopanche are reconstructed in San Luis province within the Chaco Biogeographic province. Our results indicate a long trajectory of host-tracking through space and time, where the weevil has expanded its geographic range following its host plant, without significant demographic growth. We explore the past environmental changes that could underlie the boundaries between locality groups. We suggest that geographic dispersal without population growth in Hydnorobius could be enabled by the scarcity of the host plant itself, allowing for slow expansion rates and stable populations, with no need for significant demographic growth pulses to support range expansion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Systematics and Phylogeny of Weevils)
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Open AccessArticle The Enigmatic Weevil Genus Philetaerobius from Southern Africa: Definition, Affinities and Description of Three New Species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Entiminae)
Diversity 2018, 10(2), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10020030
Received: 7 March 2018 / Revised: 17 April 2018 / Accepted: 21 April 2018 / Published: 1 May 2018
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The small entimine genus Philetaerobius Marshall, 1923 is revised, entailing a redescription of the genus and the only hitherto described species, P. nidicola Marshall, as well as the description of three new species, P. endroedyi sp. n., P. garibebi sp. n. and P.
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The small entimine genus Philetaerobius Marshall, 1923 is revised, entailing a redescription of the genus and the only hitherto described species, P. nidicola Marshall, as well as the description of three new species, P. endroedyi sp. n., P. garibebi sp. n. and P. louwi sp. n. A lectotype is designated for P. nidicola Marshall. The habitus and taxonomically important structures of all species are illustrated, including the previously unrecorded male and female genitalia. A key to the four species is provided, as well as a map of their known distributions in southern Namibia and the Northern and Western Cape provinces of South Africa. The habits of the genus, as known, are summarized, and its taxonomic position and indicated relationship with the taxonomically equally isolated genus Spartecerus are discussed. The habitus and genitalia of some Spartecerus species are also illustrated, and the available information on the life-history of the genus is summarized. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Systematics and Phylogeny of Weevils)
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Open AccessArticle Review of Cape Verde Aphanommata Wollaston, 1873 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Cossoninae) with Description of New Species, Larva and Notes on Biology and Distributional Patterns
Diversity 2018, 10(2), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10020028
Received: 29 March 2018 / Revised: 17 April 2018 / Accepted: 21 April 2018 / Published: 28 April 2018
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The genus Aphanommata in the Old World is reviewed. Aphanommata kuscheli sp. nov. from São Nicolau and A. strakai sp. nov. from Fogo (both Cape Verde islands) are described. Aphanommata euphorbiarum (Wollaston, 1867) from Santo Antão in the Cape Verde islands is
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The genus Aphanommata in the Old World is reviewed. Aphanommata kuscheli sp. nov. from São Nicolau and A. strakai sp. nov. from Fogo (both Cape Verde islands) are described. Aphanommata euphorbiarum (Wollaston, 1867) from Santo Antão in the Cape Verde islands is redescribed and its lectotype is designated. All three Aphanommata species from the Cape Verde islands as well as A. filum (Mulsant and Rey, 1859) from Old World are diagnosed, illustrated, and keyed. Mature larva of A. kuscheli sp. nov. is described, larval morphology is discussed and the current state of knowledge about immature stages of Cossoninae is summarized. Vertical and inter-insular distributional pattern of Cape Verde Aphanommata and Pselactus is reviewed and discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Systematics and Phylogeny of Weevils)
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Open AccessArticle Statistical Evaluation of Monophyly in the ‘Broad-Nosed Weevils’ through Molecular Phylogenetic Analysis Combining Mitochondrial Genome and Single-Locus Sequences (Curculionidae: Entiminae, Cyclominae, and Hyperinae)
Diversity 2018, 10(2), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10020021
Received: 20 January 2018 / Revised: 22 March 2018 / Accepted: 2 April 2018 / Published: 6 April 2018
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Abstract
Establishing well-supported monophyletic groups is a key requirement for producing a natural classification that reflects evolutionary descent. In a phylogenetic framework this is best achieved through dense taxon sampling and the analysis of a robust character dataset, combined with statistical testing of topological
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Establishing well-supported monophyletic groups is a key requirement for producing a natural classification that reflects evolutionary descent. In a phylogenetic framework this is best achieved through dense taxon sampling and the analysis of a robust character dataset, combined with statistical testing of topological hypotheses. This study assesses the monophyly of tribes and subfamilies within the diverse ‘broad-nosed weevils’ (Curculionidae: Entiminae, Cyclominae and Hyperinae) through analysis of single-locus sequence data for mitochondrial cox1 and rrnL genes, in combination with a ‘backbone’ of complete and near-complete mitochondrial genome sequences. Maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses incorporating topological constraints for various higher-taxa were statistically tested using the AU, SH, and KH tests, which indicated that three tribes within Entiminae, as presently classified, are not monophyletic. Moderate and high bootstrap support was also consistent with two entimine tribes (Peritelini and Cylydrorhinini) being each recovered as monophyletic in an unconstrained analysis. Furthermore, one genus of cyclomine weevils (Aphela) is recovered outside the clade of ‘broad-nosed weevils’, although its taxonomic placement remains uncertain. It is apparent that the present approach may be hampered by limited taxon sampling in the ‘backbone’ dataset, rendering it difficult for divergent taxa to robustly match to their closest lineages. However, with improved taxon sampling of the mitogenome tree, the general approach can be a useful taxonomic tool for weevils. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Systematics and Phylogeny of Weevils)
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Open AccessConference Report Morphological and Molecular Perspectives on the Phylogeny, Evolution, and Classification of Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea): Proceedings from the 2016 International Weevil Meeting
Diversity 2018, 10(3), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10030064
Received: 30 June 2018 / Accepted: 5 July 2018 / Published: 18 July 2018
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Abstract
The 2016 International Weevil Meeting was held immediately after the International Congress of Entomology (ICE). It built on the topics and content of the 2016 ICE weevil symposium Phylogeny and Evolution of Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea): A Symposium in Honor of Dr. Guillermo "Willy”
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The 2016 International Weevil Meeting was held immediately after the International Congress of Entomology (ICE). It built on the topics and content of the 2016 ICE weevil symposium Phylogeny and Evolution of Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea): A Symposium in Honor of Dr. Guillermo "Willy” Kuschel. Beyond catalyzing research and collaboration, the meeting was intended to serve as a forum for identifying priorities and goals for those who study weevils. The meeting consisted of 46 invited and contributed lectures, discussion sessions and introductory remarks presented by 23 speakers along with eight contributed research posters. These were organized into three convened sessions, each lasting one day: (1) weevil morphology; (2) weevil fossils, biogeography and host/habitat associations; and (3) molecular phylogenetics and classification of weevils. Some of the topics covered included the 1K Weevils Project, major morphological character systems of adult and larval weevils, weevil morphological terminology, prospects for future morphological character discovery, phylogenetic analysis of morphological character data, the current status of weevil molecular phylogenetics and evolution, resources available for phylogenetic and comparative genomic studies of weevils, the weevil fossil record, weevil biogeography and evolution, weevil host plants, evolutionary development of the weevil rostrum, resources available for weevil identification and the current status of and challenges in weevil classification. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Systematics and Phylogeny of Weevils)
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