Special Issue "Carbon Biosensors in Diagnostics"

A special issue of Diagnostics (ISSN 2075-4418). This special issue belongs to the section "Point-of-Care Diagnostics and Devices".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Owen J. Guy
Website
Guest Editor
College of Engineering, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA28PP, UK
Interests: graphene biosensors; device processing; silicon nanowires; silicon carbide; microfluidics; FET biosensors
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Anitha Devadoss
Website
Co-Guest Editor
Centre for Nanohealth, College of Engineering, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP, UK
Interests: biosensors; electrochemical biosensors; photoelectrochemical biosensors; nanomaterials; surface functionalisation; bioconjugation; bioelectrochemistry; cancer diagnostics; gold nanoparticles; graphene; chemiluminescence; photocatalysts

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The continual attempts in developing highly sensitive biosensor platforms endorse early diagnosis as key to better treatment. With the rapid development of nanotechnology, a wide range of nanomaterials has been developed that realise improved biosensor performance. Particularly, carbon nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes, graphene, polymeric films, etc., have been used extensively in various biosensor applications owing to their unique electron conducting properties and low cost. Over 50,000 carbon based biosensors research articles have been published in the last year, addressing various features of biosensors, such as improved sensitivity/selectivity, multiplexing, single molecule detection, etc.

This Special Issue on “Carbon Biosensors in Diagnostics” aims at bringing the collection of recent research and review articles focusing on all aspects of sensor science including but not limited to the state of the art, electrode fabrication, surface functionalization, signal amplification, microfluidic devices and novel transduction techniques that selectively sense chemical or biological species or processes. Articles may focus on developing sensors for commercialisation or new detection strategies for improving the existing bioanalysis. We invite you to be part of this Special Issue and contribute to the field of Biosensors.

Prof. Dr. Owen J. Guy
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diagnostics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biosensors
  • Chemical sensors
  • Carbon nanotubes
  • Graphene biosensors
  • Surface functionalization
  • Polymers
  • Device fabrication
  • Microfluidic devices
  • Biosensor assay
  • Biomarkers

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Label-Free Sensors Based on Graphene Field-Effect Transistors for the Detection of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Cancer Risk Biomarker
Diagnostics 2018, 8(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics8010005 - 08 Jan 2018
Cited by 14
Abstract
We report on the development of label-free chemical vapour deposition (CVD) graphene field effect transistor (GFET) immunosensors for the sensitive detection of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG), a glycoprotein risk biomarker of certain cancers. The GFET sensors were fabricated on Si/SiO2 substrate using [...] Read more.
We report on the development of label-free chemical vapour deposition (CVD) graphene field effect transistor (GFET) immunosensors for the sensitive detection of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG), a glycoprotein risk biomarker of certain cancers. The GFET sensors were fabricated on Si/SiO2 substrate using photolithography with evaporated chromium and sputtered gold contacts. GFET channels were functionalised with a linker molecule to an immobile anti-hCG antibody on the surface of graphene. The binding reaction of the antibody with varying concentration levels of hCG antigen demonstrated the limit of detection of the GFET sensors to be below 1 pg/mL using four-probe electrical measurements. We also show that annealing can significantly improve the carrier transport properties of GFETs and shift the Dirac point (Fermi level) with reduced p-doping in back-gated measurements. The developed GFET biosensors are generic and could find applications in a broad range of medical diagnostics in addition to cancer, such as neurodegenerative (Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s ) and cardiovascular disorders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Biosensors in Diagnostics)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Graphene Field Effect Transistors for Biomedical Applications: Current Status and Future Prospects
Diagnostics 2017, 7(3), 45; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics7030045 - 26 Jul 2017
Cited by 17
Abstract
Since the discovery of the two-dimensional (2D) carbon material, graphene, just over a decade ago, the development of graphene-based field effect transistors (G-FETs) has become a widely researched area, particularly for use in point-of-care biomedical applications. G-FETs are particularly attractive as next generation [...] Read more.
Since the discovery of the two-dimensional (2D) carbon material, graphene, just over a decade ago, the development of graphene-based field effect transistors (G-FETs) has become a widely researched area, particularly for use in point-of-care biomedical applications. G-FETs are particularly attractive as next generation bioelectronics due to their mass-scalability and low cost of the technology’s manufacture. Furthermore, G-FETs offer the potential to complete label-free, rapid, and highly sensitive analysis coupled with a high sample throughput. These properties, coupled with the potential for integration into portable instrumentation, contribute to G-FETs’ suitability for point-of-care diagnostics. This review focuses on elucidating the recent developments in the field of G-FET sensors that act on a bioaffinity basis, whereby a binding event between a bioreceptor and the target analyte is transduced into an electrical signal at the G-FET surface. Recognizing and quantifying these target analytes accurately and reliably is essential in diagnosing many diseases, therefore it is vital to design the G-FET with care. Taking into account some limitations of the sensor platform, such as Debye–Hükel screening and device surface area, is fundamental in developing improved bioelectronics for applications in the clinical setting. This review highlights some efforts undertaken in facing these limitations in order to bring G-FET development for biomedical applications forward. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Biosensors in Diagnostics)
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Open AccessReview
Diagnostics Strategies with Electrochemical Affinity Biosensors Using Carbon Nanomaterials as Electrode Modifiers
Diagnostics 2017, 7(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics7010002 - 26 Dec 2016
Cited by 14
Abstract
Early diagnosis is often the key to successful patient treatment and survival. The identification of various disease signaling biomarkers which reliably reflect normal and disease states in humans in biological fluids explain the burgeoning research field in developing new methodologies able to determine [...] Read more.
Early diagnosis is often the key to successful patient treatment and survival. The identification of various disease signaling biomarkers which reliably reflect normal and disease states in humans in biological fluids explain the burgeoning research field in developing new methodologies able to determine the target biomarkers in complex biological samples with the required sensitivity and selectivity and in a simple and rapid way. The unique advantages offered by electrochemical sensors together with the availability of high affinity and specific bioreceptors and their great capabilities in terms of sensitivity and stability imparted by nanostructuring the electrode surface with different carbon nanomaterials have led to the development of new electrochemical biosensing strategies that have flourished as interesting alternatives to conventional methodologies for clinical diagnostics. This paper briefly reviews the advantages of using carbon nanostructures and their hybrid nanocomposites as electrode modifiers to construct efficient electrochemical sensing platforms for diagnosis. The review provides an updated overview of some selected examples involving attractive amplification and biosensing approaches which have been applied to the determination of relevant genetic and protein diagnostics biomarkers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Biosensors in Diagnostics)
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