Medical Optical Imaging: Current Diagnostics, Therapeutic and Surgical Applications in Ophthalmology—Third Edition

A special issue of Diagnostics (ISSN 2075-4418). This special issue belongs to the section "Optical Diagnostics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 950

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Medicine, Surgery and Health Sciences, University Eye Clinic of Trieste, 34100 Trieste, Italy
Interests: optical coherence tomography angiography; diabetic macular edema; intravitreal dexamethasone implant; diabetic retinopathy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of General Ophthalmology, Medical University of Lublin, 20-079 Lublin, Poland
Interests: cataract surgery; ocular trauma managment; vitreoretinal surgery; experimental ocular surgery; 3D surgery; secondary IOL implantation; pole-to-pole surgery
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Eye Clinic, Department of Medicine, Surgery and Health Sciences, University of Trieste, 34134 Trieste, Italy
Interests: ophthalmology; cataract surgery; diabetic maculopathy; Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The anatomy of the eyes is unique because it allows ophthalmologists to see inside the body, exploiting the principles of illumination and magnification. Imaging technologies have radically evolved during the past few decades. The introduction of imaging tools has significantly improved the diagnosis; the treatment, including intraoperative applications; and the follow-up of many ophthalmic conditions. Unfortunately, some of the data provided by innovative tools are still only employed in research settings because of a lack of consensus on their use in routine clinical practice.

The aim of this Special Issue is to share information about newly developed methodologies and advancements in optical imaging technology in the field of ophthalmology.

The scope of this Special Issue includes original studies on innovative technologies and/or methods applied to the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of anterior and posterior segment diseases. Studies dealing with multimodal imaging methods as well as reviews on the currently available tools will also be accepted.

Prof. Dr. Daniele Tognetto
Dr. Mario Damiano Toro
Dr. Rosa Giglio
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diagnostics is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • optical imaging
  • optical coherence tomography (OCT)
  • intraoperative OCT
  • OCT angiography
  • imaging systems
  • biomedical optics
  • in vivo imaging
  • polarization
  • fluorescence imaging
  • fundus autofluorescence imaging

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Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

10 pages, 2181 KiB  
Article
Analysis of Choriocapillaris Reperfusion Topography following Faricimab Treatment for Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Non-Treatment-Naïve Patients
by Max Brinkmann, Pasquale Viggiano, Giacomo Boscia, Mathis Danckwardt, Evelyn Susantija, Tom Müller, Niccolò Castellino, Jakob Schweighofer, Francesco Boscia, Mario Damiano Toro and Yosuf El-Shabrawi
Diagnostics 2024, 14(9), 901; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics14090901 - 25 Apr 2024
Viewed by 781
Abstract
To assess changes in choriocapillaris (CC) vascular density surrounding macular neovascularization (MNV) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) when transitioning from various anti-VEGF treatments to faricimab, using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA). 25 eyes of 22 individuals who underwent intravitreal faricimab injections for neovascular [...] Read more.
To assess changes in choriocapillaris (CC) vascular density surrounding macular neovascularization (MNV) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) when transitioning from various anti-VEGF treatments to faricimab, using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA). 25 eyes of 22 individuals who underwent intravitreal faricimab injections for neovascular AMD with type 1 MNV were included. OCTA images were obtained prior to (T0), after one (T1), and after three faricimab injections (T2); Noteworthy changes occurred in the first ring at T2 in comparison to T0. The percentage of CC flow deficit (FD%), FD average area (FDa), and FD number (FDn) in 5 rings (R1-R5) surrounding the dark halo around the MNV were calculated. A reduction in FD% at T2 compared to T0 (50.5 ± 10.2% at T0, 46.4 ± 10.6% at T2; p = 0.020) was seen, indicating CC reperfusion. Additionally, we observed a reduction in the average FDa (140.2 ± 172.1% at T0, 93.7 ± 101.8% at T2; p = 0.029). Our study highlights an FD% after three consecutive faricimab injections. The most pronounced effect was observed in the first ring, directly adjacent to the dark halo, suggesting a partial CC reperfusion surrounding the MNV, potentially indicating disease regression. Full article
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