Special Issue "Current Advances in Clinical Genomics and Treatment of Urothelial Carcinoma"

A special issue of Current Oncology (ISSN 1718-7729). This special issue belongs to the section "Genitourinary Oncology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 April 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Panagiotis J. Vlachostergios
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, United States
Interests: Genitourinary cancers (prostate, urothelial, kidney); Genetics; Cancer genomics; Genomic cancer risk assessment; Cancer immunotherapy; Clinical trials; Precision oncology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Immense progress in large-scale genomics projects is transforming the therapeutic landscape of various cancers. Urothelial carcinoma is a common, potentially lethal malignancy, particularly in the advanced stage. Immune checkpoint inhibitors, antibody drug conjugates, and novel targeted agents have become part of the treatment armamentarium for urothelial carcinoma. An important challenge for clinicians is how to best utilize genomic approaches to predict treatment responses and identify patients who can derive a preferential benefit from these therapeutic options. This Special Issue aims at providing an update on recent advances in the molecular landscape of UC and how genomic alterations in key signaling pathways might serve in biomarker development, drug development, and prediction of patient outcomes. 

Dr. Panagiotis J. Vlachostergios
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Current Oncology is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • urothelial carcinoma
  • genomics
  • genetics
  • molecular alterations
  • biomarker
  • sensitivity
  • resistance
  • therapeutics
  • immunotherapy
  • antibody–drug conjugates

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Renin-Angiotensin System Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Are Associated with Bladder Cancer Risk
Curr. Oncol. 2021, 28(6), 4702-4708; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol28060396 - 15 Nov 2021
Viewed by 494
Abstract
The renin-angiotensin system (RAS), besides being a major regulator of blood pressure, is also involved in tumor angiogenesis. Emerging evidence suggests a correlation between the use of pharmacologic RAS inhibitors and a delay in urothelial bladder cancer (BC) progression. However, it is unknown [...] Read more.
The renin-angiotensin system (RAS), besides being a major regulator of blood pressure, is also involved in tumor angiogenesis. Emerging evidence suggests a correlation between the use of pharmacologic RAS inhibitors and a delay in urothelial bladder cancer (BC) progression. However, it is unknown whether RAS gene variants may predispose to the development of BC. This study examined the association of RAS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) including AT1R rs5186, AT2R rs11091046, REN rs12750834, ANG rs4762, and ANG rs699 with the risk of developing non-invasive BC. Peripheral blood samples from 73 patients with T1 urothelial BC (66 men, seven women) and an equal number of healthy subjects (control group) were collected. The TT genotype of the REN rs12750834 SNP (OR: 2.8 [1.3–6.05], p = 0.008) and to a lesser extent the presence of the T allele (OR: 2.3 [1.2–4.48], p = 0.01) conferred a higher risk of BC. The highest risk for BC within SNP carriers of the RAS system was associated with the presence of the CC genotype (OR: 17.6 [7.5–41.35], p < 0.001) and C allele (OR: 17.7 [8.8–35.9], p < 0.001) of the ANG rs699 SNP. The presence of the AT2R rs11091046 SNP, particularly the AA genotype, was associated with a protective effect against developing BC (OR: 0.268 [0.126–057], p < 0.001). In conclusion, these results support the clinical utility of RAS gene SNPs AT2R rs11091046, REN rs12750834, and ANG rs699 in the genetic cancer risk assessment of patients and families with BC. Full article
Article
ERCC1 19007 Polymorphism in Greek Patients with Advanced Urothelial Cancer Treated with Platinum-Based Chemotherapy: Effect of the Changing Treatment Paradigm: A Cohort Study by the Hellenic GU Cancer Group
Curr. Oncol. 2021, 28(6), 4474-4484; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol28060380 - 05 Nov 2021
Viewed by 257
Abstract
We previously showed that ERCC1 19007 C>T polymorphism was associated with cancer-specific survival (CSS) after platinum-based chemotherapy in patients with advanced urothelial cancer (aUC). We aimed to confirm this association in a different cohort of patients. Genotyping of the 19007C>T polymorphism was carried [...] Read more.
We previously showed that ERCC1 19007 C>T polymorphism was associated with cancer-specific survival (CSS) after platinum-based chemotherapy in patients with advanced urothelial cancer (aUC). We aimed to confirm this association in a different cohort of patients. Genotyping of the 19007C>T polymorphism was carried out by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) in 98 aUC patients, treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. Median age of the patients was 68.8, 13.3% of them were female, 90.8% had ECOG PS of 0 or 1, and 48% received cisplatin-based chemotherapy. In addition to chemotherapy, 32.7% of the patients received immunotherapy, and 19.4% vinflunine. Eighty-one patients (82.7%) were carriers of the 19007T polymorphic allele: 46 (46.9%) were heterozygotes, and 35 (35.7%) were homozygotes. The ERCC1 polymorphism was not associated with CSS, progression-free (PFS), or overall (OS) survival in the total population. Nevertheless, there was a significant interaction between the prognostic significance of ERCC1 polymorphism and the use of modern immunotherapy: the T allele was associated with worse outcome in patients who received chemotherapy only, while this association was lost in patients who received both chemotherapy and immune checkpoint inhibitors. Our study suggests that novel therapies may influence the significance of ERCC1 polymorphism in patients with aUC. Its determination may be useful in the changing treatment landscape of the disease. Full article
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Article
DNA Repair Gene Polymorphisms and Susceptibility to Urothelial Carcinoma in a Southeastern European Population
Curr. Oncol. 2021, 28(3), 1879-1885; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol28030174 - 14 May 2021
Viewed by 619
Abstract
Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DNA repair genes may predispose to urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB). This study focused on three specific SNPs in a population with high exposure to environmental carcinogens including tobacco and alcohol. A case-control study design was used [...] Read more.
Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DNA repair genes may predispose to urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB). This study focused on three specific SNPs in a population with high exposure to environmental carcinogens including tobacco and alcohol. A case-control study design was used to assess for presence of XPC PAT +/−, XRCC3 Thr241Met, and ERCC2 Lys751Gln DNA repair gene SNPs in peripheral blood from patients with UCB and healthy individuals. One hundred patients and equal number of healthy subjects were enrolled. The XPC PAT +/+ genotype was associated with a 2-fold increased risk of UCB (OR = 2.16; 95%CI: 1.14–4; p = 0.01). The −/+ and +/+ XPC PAT genotypes were more frequently present in patients with multiple versus single tumors (p = 0.01). No association was detected between ERCC2 Lys751Gln genotypes/alleles, and risk for developing UCB. Presence of the XRCC3 TT genotype (OR = 0.14; 95%CI:0.07–0.25; p < 0.01) and of the T allele overall (OR = 0.26; 95%CI:0.16–0.41; p < 0.01) conferred a protective effect against developing UCB. The XPC PAT −/+ and XRCC3 Thr241Met SNPs are associated with predisposition to UCB. The XPC PAT −/+ SNP is also an indicator of bladder tumor multiplicity, which might require a more individualized surveillance and treatment. Full article
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