Special Issue "Antioxidant and Anti-inflammatory Properties of Natural Compounds to Be Used in Cosmetics"

A special issue of Cosmetics (ISSN 2079-9284).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Lucia Panzella
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Naples "Federico II", I-80126 Naples, Italy
Interests: chemistry, analysis, and photoreactivity of melanins and melanin precursors; phenolic compounds; antioxidants; antinitrosating agents; biomaterials
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The importance of natural compounds endowed with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties to be used in cosmetics is progressively increasing. Indeed, these compounds can counteract the damages induced by free radicals and reactive oxygen species on skin cells, involved, e.g., in wrinkling, photoaging, elastosis, drying, and hyperpigmentation of the skin.

This Special Issue is dedicated to natural compounds with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant actions and their potential for application in skin-care formulations and cosmetics. Original research articles dealing with the elucidation of mechanisms of action, therapeutic effectiveness, and safety aspects in the application of such biologically-active natural compounds are encouraged. Manuscripts describing the development of novel formulations allowing for a higher stability and bioavailability of bioactive compounds are also welcome. Attention will also be devoted to green and sustainable approaches for the recovery of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compounds from natural sources to be used in cosmetic products, as well as to bioprocessing and green chemistry solutions to improve their bioactivity. In the case of plant-derived extracts, structural characterization and identification of the main bioactive components will be required. Review articles describing the current state-of-the-art are also welcome.

Prof. Dr. Lucia Panzella
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cosmetics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Antioxidant
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Photoaging
  • Hyperpigmentation
  • Reactive oxygen species
  • Free radicals
  • Delivery systems
  • Polyphenols
  • Skin damage
  • Sustainability
  • Green chemistry
  • Bioprocessing

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

Article
Potential of Fermented Fruit Peel Liquid in Cosmetics as a Skin Care Agent
Cosmetics 2021, 8(2), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics8020033 - 04 May 2021
Viewed by 1339
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant, antibacterial, and anti-UVB of three kinds of fermented fruit peel extracts by pectinase enzyme, including pomegranate, pomelo, and banana peel. The antioxidant was evaluated by the DPPH (2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) free radical scavenging method. Antibacterial [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant, antibacterial, and anti-UVB of three kinds of fermented fruit peel extracts by pectinase enzyme, including pomegranate, pomelo, and banana peel. The antioxidant was evaluated by the DPPH (2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) free radical scavenging method. Antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus was assessed by disk diffusion assay, and the photoprotective activity was measured using a photospectrometric method. The results revealed that pomegranate peel extract at 3000 IU/g peel exhibited potent free radical scavenging property against DPPH, with the smallest IC50 value at 0.18%, which was better than that of pomelo peel extract at 55.79%. Furthermore, the results suggested that the pomegranate peel extract also exhibited antibacterial activity against E. coli better than pomelo peel extract, but none of the three samples shows the antibacterial capacity against S. aureus. Moreover, 10% pomegranate peel extract also expressed the strongest anti-UVB activity, with an SPF value of 36.582. The research demonstrates pomegranate peel’s bioactivity potential for further experiments. Full article
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Article
In Vitro Cultured Melissa officinalis Cells as Effective Ingredient to Protect Skin against Oxidative Stress, Blue Light, and Infrared Irradiations Damages
Cosmetics 2021, 8(1), 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics8010023 - 15 Mar 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1766
Abstract
Skin is being increasingly exposed to artificial blue light due to the extensive use of electronic devices, which can induce cell oxidative stress, causing signs of early photo aging. The Melissa officinalis phytocomplex is a new standardized cosmetic ingredient obtained by an in [...] Read more.
Skin is being increasingly exposed to artificial blue light due to the extensive use of electronic devices, which can induce cell oxidative stress, causing signs of early photo aging. The Melissa officinalis phytocomplex is a new standardized cosmetic ingredient obtained by an in vitro plant cell culture with a high content of rosmarinic acid. In this study, we examine the activity of the Melissa officinalis phytocomplex to protect skin against blue light and infrared damages, evaluating the ROS (Radical Oxygen Species) level in keratinocyte cell line from human skin (HaCaT) and Nrf2 (Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2), elastin, and MMP1 (Matrix Metalloproteinase 1) immunostaining in living human skin explants ex vivo. This phytocomplex demonstrates antioxidant activity by reducing ROS production and thus the oxidant damage of the skin caused by UV and blue light exposure. In addition, it inhibits blue light-induced Nrf2 transcriptional activity, IR-induced elastin alteration, and IR-induced MMP-1 release. This Melissa officinalis phytocomplex is a new innovative active ingredient for cosmetic products that is able to protect skin against light and screen exposure damages and oxidative stress. Full article
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Article
4′,7-Isoflavandiol (Equol) Enhances Human Dermal Fibroblast Renewal and Has Effects Similar to 17β-Estradiol in Stimulating Collagen and Elastin Expression. Cell Cycle and RT-PCR Analysis without Phenol Red
Cosmetics 2021, 8(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics8010005 - 04 Jan 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1377
Abstract
Polyphenols have general health benefits including anti-photoaging influences to counter the negative effects of ultra-violet (UV) rays from solar light (via the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress (OS)), which leads to the stimulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that break [...] Read more.
Polyphenols have general health benefits including anti-photoaging influences to counter the negative effects of ultra-violet (UV) rays from solar light (via the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress (OS)), which leads to the stimulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that break down collagen and elastin. The changes in elastin and collagen represent major factors in dermal aging along with a decrease in skin fibroblast number and function. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of a polyphenolic molecule, 4′,7-Isoflavandiol (Equol) at 10 nM on: (1) fibroblast number and function via cell cycle testing (including apoptosis) and collagen protein expression (types I and III) using long-term (eight-week) 3D human fibroblast cultures by intracellular fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis, and (2) quantifying elastin gene expression levels in short-term (four day) cultures using human monolayer fibroblasts by RT-PCR. In both in vitro testing methods, the presence of phenol red (tissue culture indicator) interfered with the parameter results. Therefore, all experiments were performed without phenol red. Using FACS analysis in the long-term 3D cultures exposure to 10 nM of equol for four days significantly increased the percentage of cycling fibroblasts (rejuvenation) above vehicle control (dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)) or 17β-estradiol levels, while apoptosis was not altered by any treatment. In addition, in the long-term cultures, collagen levels were significantly increased in the equol and 17β-estradiol treatments above vehicle control values. In short-term cultures, 10 nM of equol or 17β-estradiol significantly increased elastin gene expression levels above vehicle control values. In summary: (a) phenol red may interfere with tissue culture parameter results and (b) the polyphenolic equol compound, derived from plants, may provide protection against photoaging in cosmetic formulations by stimulating collagen, elastin, and enhancing fibroblast renewal. Full article
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Article
Moringa oleifera Seed Oil Formulation Physical Stability and Chemical Constituents for Enhancing Skin Hydration and Antioxidant Activity
Cosmetics 2021, 8(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics8010002 - 25 Dec 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2630
Abstract
Moringa oleifera seed oil has been recognized for its benefits in relation to the skin. The objective of this study was to evaluate the chemical composition and antioxidant activity of moringa seed oil, to formulate a moringa seed oil cream, and to determine [...] Read more.
Moringa oleifera seed oil has been recognized for its benefits in relation to the skin. The objective of this study was to evaluate the chemical composition and antioxidant activity of moringa seed oil, to formulate a moringa seed oil cream, and to determine the efficacy of moringa seed oil cream in vivo. The chemical components of moringa seed oil were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography. The antioxidant activity of the oil was determined by a 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free-radical scavenging assay. An oil-in-water cream containing moringa seed oil was developed and characterized for antioxidant activity. The moringa seed oil cream was further subjected to the accelerated stability test of heating–cooling cycles for six cycles and stored isothermally at 4, 30, and 45 °C for 28 days. The efficacy of moringa seed oil cream was investigated in 32 participants by measuring their skin hydration, erythema, melanin values, and visco-elasticity. The results showed that moringa seed oil contained α-tocopherol, plant sterols, and fatty acids. The oil had antioxidant activity with a 50% of initial concentration (IC50) value of 121.9 mg/mL. The stability study indicated that the pH, viscosity, and rheological behavior of the cream containing moringa seed oil were not significantly changed after storage at 4, 30, and 45 °C for 28 days and six heating–cooling cycles. The moringa seed oil cream exhibited in vitro antioxidant activity and increased the in vivo skin hydration level compared with the cream base. There was no report of skin irritation from moringa seed oil cream application, suggesting that the moringa seed oil cream developed in this study was appropriate for pharmaceutical and cosmetic uses. A M. oleifera seed oil cream was successfully developed. The moringa seed oil cream possessed antioxidant activity, enhanced the skin hydration level, and reduced skin erythema, but did not affect the melanin content and skin visco-elasticity. The moringa seed oil cream did not induce skin irritation and, thus, was safe to use. Full article
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Article
Characterization of Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory Tissue Factors in Rosacea: A Pilot study
Cosmetics 2020, 7(4), 82; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics7040082 - 30 Oct 2020
Viewed by 1364
Abstract
Rosacea is a chronic inflammatory skin disease mainly affecting the facial skin. Our aim was to determine the appearance of pro- and anti- inflammatory cytokines in rosacea-affected facial tissue. Materials and Methods: Rosacea tissue were obtained from eight patients (aged 35 to 50 [...] Read more.
Rosacea is a chronic inflammatory skin disease mainly affecting the facial skin. Our aim was to determine the appearance of pro- and anti- inflammatory cytokines in rosacea-affected facial tissue. Materials and Methods: Rosacea tissue were obtained from eight patients (aged 35 to 50 years). The control group (CG) included four facial skin samples (49 to 70 years). Routine staining and immunohistochemistry for IL-1, IL-10, LL-37, HBD-2, and HBD-4 proceeded. Results: Inflammation was observed in all the rosacea samples. A statistically significant difference was seen between epithelial HBD-2 positive cells in comparison to the control. There was a strong positive correlation between HBD-4 in the epithelium and HBD-4 in the connective tissue, IL-10 in the epithelium and IL-1 in the connective tissue, and IL-1 in the epithelium and IL-10 in the connective tissue. Conclusion: Increased levels of IL-10 and decreased levels of IL-1 show the balance between anti- and pro-inflammatory tissue responses. A significant amount of HBD-2 in the epithelium proves its important role in the local immune response of rosacea-affected tissue. The last effect seems to be intensified by the elevated level of LL-37 in the epithelium. Full article
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Article
Skin Protective Activity of LactoSporin-the Extracellular Metabolite from Bacillus Coagulans MTCC 5856
Cosmetics 2020, 7(4), 76; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics7040076 - 27 Sep 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2990
Abstract
Background: Probiotics and their products are increasingly used in skincare in recent years. Postbiotics are defined as any substance derived through the metabolic activity of a probiotic microorganism, which exerts a direct or indirect beneficial effect on the host. The extracellular metabolites of [...] Read more.
Background: Probiotics and their products are increasingly used in skincare in recent years. Postbiotics are defined as any substance derived through the metabolic activity of a probiotic microorganism, which exerts a direct or indirect beneficial effect on the host. The extracellular metabolites of probiotic bacteria have antimicrobial activities, protect against acne, and improve skin condition. We studied skin protective activities of the extracellular metabolite (LactoSporin) of a spore-forming probiotic Bacillus coagulans MTCC 5856 in vitro. Methods: LactoSporin was evaluated for antioxidant activity by free radical scavenging activity and reactive oxygen quenching activity in human dermal fibroblast cells. Protection of fibroblasts from UV-induced apoptosis and cell death was studied by flow cytometry and neutral red uptake assays. Enzyme inhibition assays were carried out for collagenase, Elastase, and Hyaluronidase. Gene expression studies were carried out using polymerase chain reaction. Results: LactoSporin showed antioxidant activity and was found to protect skin cells from UV-induced apoptosis and cell death. LactoSporin inhibited collagenase, elastase, and hyaluronidase activity and upregulated the expression of hyaluronan synthase, transforming growth factor and epidermal growth factor, which are associated with extracellular matrix integrity. Conclusions: These results suggest LactoSporin is a skin protective postbiotic with wide application in cosmetic formulations. Full article
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Article
Natural Flavones and Flavonols: Relationships among Antioxidant Activity, Glycation, and Metalloproteinase Inhibition
Cosmetics 2020, 7(3), 71; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics7030071 - 17 Sep 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1629
Abstract
Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species as well as advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) and metalloproteinases (MMPs) play a key role in the development and progression of degenerative processes of body tissues, including skin. Natural antioxidant flavonoids could be beneficial in inhibiting AGEs’ formation and [...] Read more.
Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species as well as advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) and metalloproteinases (MMPs) play a key role in the development and progression of degenerative processes of body tissues, including skin. Natural antioxidant flavonoids could be beneficial in inhibiting AGEs’ formation and MMPs’ expression. In this study, the antioxidant activity of flavones (luteolin, apigenin, and chrysin) and flavonols (mirycetin, quercetin, and kaempferol) was compared with their inhibitory effects on both metalloproteinases’ (MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-9, MMP-13) and AGEs’ formation. Comparisons were performed taking into account the hydroxyl group arrangement and the physico-chemical parameters the binding dissociation enthalpy (BDE), ionization potential (IP), partition coefficient (log P), and topological polar surface area (TPSA). Increasing the number of hydroxyl groups led to a proportional enhancement of antioxidant activity while an inverse relationship was observed plotting the antioxidant activity vs. BDE and IP values. All flavonoids acted as AGEs, MMP-1, and MMP-13 inhibitors, but they were less effective against MMP-2 and MMP-9. The inhibition of MMP-1 seemed to be related to the TPSA values while high TPSA and low log P values seemed important conditions for inhibiting MMP-13. Overall, our data suggest that an estimation of flavonoid activity could be anticipated based on their physico-chemical parameters. Full article
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