Special Issue "Biointerface Coatings for Biomaterials and Biomedical Applications"

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 November 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Hsien-Yeh Chen
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering, National TaiwanUniversity, Taipei 10617, Taiwan
Interests: biomolecular engineering; vapor-deposition; surface chemistry technique; biomedical coating technology
Prof. Dr. Peng-Yuan Wang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Biomedicine and Biotechnology, Shenzhen Instituteof Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences,Shenzhen 518055, China
Interests: biomaterials; nanotechnology; biointerfaces; stem cells

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We would like to invite you to submit your work to this Special Issue on "Biointerface Coatings for Biomaterials and Biomedical Applications".

In addition to meeting the minimal requirement of biocompatibility, advanced biomaterials have acquired functions, allowing them to directly or indirectly influence specific biological environments. These modifications of biomaterials are generally achieved by establishing an interface layer, i.e., a biointerface coating, to deliver the desired functions. The design of a successful biointerface usually depends on criteria such as controlled presentation of functional biomolecules on the surface, low nonspecific protein adsorption, responsive actions toward external stimuli, multifunctionality, compatibility with micro- to nanofabrication, surface morphology or microstructures, biodegradability, and physical to chemical gradients. Many promising approaches have been realized by existing surface modification technologies based on both physical and chemical methods of rendering fabricated coatings on biomaterials, from basic self-assembly of molecules to top–down construction of bulk materials. Numerous methods exploit a complimentary and/or combinatorial strategy, paving the way to advanced and effective functional coatings for prospective biomaterials.

This Research Topic welcomes discussions related to biointerface coatings, including but not limited to the following:

(1) Molecularly self-assembled coatings;
(2) Surface modifications of coatings;
(3) Layer-by-layer coatings;
(4) Grafted coatings;
(5) Physically adsorbed coatings;
(6) Vapor-deposited coatings
(7) Coatings with chemical activity and/or physical properties;
(8) Innovations of novel coatings for biotechnological applications.

Encouraged forms of submission include original research papers, reviews, and perspective articles.

Prof. Dr. Hsien-Yeh Chen
Prof. Dr. Peng-Yuan Wang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
One-Step Preparation of Nickel Nanoparticle-Based Magnetic Poly(Vinyl Alcohol) Gels
Coatings 2019, 9(11), 744; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings9110744 (registering DOI) - 09 Nov 2019
Abstract
Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are of great interest due to their unique properties, especially in biomedical applications. MNPs can be incorporated into other matrixes to prepare new functional nanomaterials. In this work, we described a facile, one-step strategy for the synthesis of magnetic poly(vinyl [...] Read more.
Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are of great interest due to their unique properties, especially in biomedical applications. MNPs can be incorporated into other matrixes to prepare new functional nanomaterials. In this work, we described a facile, one-step strategy for the synthesis of magnetic poly(vinyl alcohol) (mPVA) gels. In the synthesis, nickel nanoparticles and cross-linked mPVA gels were simultaneously formed. Ni nanoparticles (NPs) were also incorporated into a stimuli-responsive polymer to result in multiresponsive gels. The size of and distribution of the Ni particles within the mPVA gels were controlled by experimental conditions. The mPVA gels were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, magnetic measurements, and thermogravimetric analysis. The new mPVA gels are expected to have applications in drug delivery and biotechnology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biointerface Coatings for Biomaterials and Biomedical Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Mangrove Inspired Anti-Corrosion Coatings
Coatings 2019, 9(11), 725; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings9110725 - 01 Nov 2019
Abstract
Marine corrosion accounts for one-third of the total corrosion cost and has been one of the greatest challenges for modern society. Organic coatings are known as the most widely used protective means. An effective control of the transport of corrosive substances is the [...] Read more.
Marine corrosion accounts for one-third of the total corrosion cost and has been one of the greatest challenges for modern society. Organic coatings are known as the most widely used protective means. An effective control of the transport of corrosive substances is the key to the anti-corrosion performance. In nature, the mangrove survives and thrives in marine tidal zones despite high salinity and humidity. We first showed that the mangrove leaves have salt glands that can secrete excessive ions to control the ion transport in and out. Inspired by this, we proposed a design of bio-inspired, anti-corrosion coating that mimics this functional feature, and fabricated the bipolar, hydrophobic coatings by doping ion-selective resins and constructing surface structures, which restrict the transport of corrosive substances and the electrochemical corrosion at the coating/metal interface. Our results show that the bio-inspired coatings effectively block and control the transport of both the Na+ and Cl, and, together with the hydrophobic surface, the coating system exhibits significantly improved anti-corrosion properties, more than a three orders of magnitude decrease in corrosion current density when compared with the control group (epoxy varnish). Therefore, the mangrove-inspired coatings show a promising protective strategy for the ever-demanding corrosion issues plaguing modern industries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biointerface Coatings for Biomaterials and Biomedical Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Chemical and Biological Roles of Zinc in a Porous Titanium Dioxide Layer Formed by Micro-Arc Oxidation
Coatings 2019, 9(11), 705; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings9110705 - 29 Oct 2019
Abstract
This study investigated the time transient effect of zinc (Zn) in the porous titanium dioxide formed by micro-arc oxidation (MAO) treatment routinely performed for Zn-containing electrolytes. The aim of our analysis was to understand the changes in both the chemical and biological properties [...] Read more.
This study investigated the time transient effect of zinc (Zn) in the porous titanium dioxide formed by micro-arc oxidation (MAO) treatment routinely performed for Zn-containing electrolytes. The aim of our analysis was to understand the changes in both the chemical and biological properties of Zn in physiological saline. The morphology of the Zn-incorporated MAO surface did not change, and a small amount of Zn ions were released at early stages of incubation in saline. We observed a decrease in Zn concentration in the oxide layer because its release and chemical state (Zn2+ compound to ZnO) changed over time during incubation in saline. In addition, the antibacterial property of the Zn-incorporated MAO surface developed at late periods after the incubation process over a course of 28 days. Furthermore, osteogenic cells were able to proliferate and were calcified on the specimens with Zn. The changes related to Zn in saline had non-toxic effects on the osteogenic cells. In conclusion, the time transient effect of Zn in a porous titanium dioxide layer was beneficial to realize dual functions, namely the antibacterial property and osteogenic cell compatibility. Our study suggests the importance of the chemical state changes of Zn to control its chemical and biological properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biointerface Coatings for Biomaterials and Biomedical Applications)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

planned paper 1

Paper Type: Review

Title:A review of surface micropatterning as a powerful tool to manipulate stem cell functions

Authors: Naoki Kawazoe and Guoping Chen

Affiliations:

Research Center for Functional Materials, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0044, Japan

Abstact:

Micropatterning techniques have found broad applications in biomedicine such as cell-based drug screening and point-of-care devices over the past decades, and, more recently tissue engineering scaffolds and organ-on-chips. Several techniques have been extensively developed and implemented to create precisely-controlled micropatterns, such as photolithography, microcontact imprinting, plasma/laser ablation, and stencil micropatterning. These techniques can also offer a powerful tool for basic studies in cell biology to investigate the impact of cell morphology, cell-cell interaction, and cell-material interaction on cell functions which include cell spreading, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. They can precisely control cell location and cell morphology at the single-cell scale on the substrate. Previous studies of cell culture on micropatterned surfaces have shown a number of interesting results on their functions that were not obtained in the conventional cell culture. In recent years, much attention has been paid to the manipulation of stem cells as a promising source for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, because they are able to self-renew and differentiate into various specialized cell linages. This review highlights the recent advances of micropatterning for the manipulation of stem cell functions.

 

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