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Open AccessArticle

Proteomic Analysis of Biomaterial Surfaces after Contacting with Body Fluids by MALDI-ToF Mass Spectroscopy

1
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Materials and Chemical Technology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8502, Japan
2
Surface and Interface Science Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan
3
JST-PRESTO, 4-1-8 Hon-cho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Coatings 2020, 10(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10010012
Received: 22 October 2019 / Revised: 25 November 2019 / Accepted: 17 December 2019 / Published: 22 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biointerface Coatings for Biomaterials and Biomedical Applications)
We developed a method to identify proteins adsorbed on solid surfaces from a solution containing a complex mixture of proteins by using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time of Flight mass (MALDI-ToF mass) spectroscopy. In the method, we performed all procedures of peptide mass fingerprint method including denaturation, reduction, alkylation, digestion, and spotting of matrix on substrates. The method enabled us to avoid artifacts of pipetting that could induce changes in the composition. We also developed an algorithm to identify the adsorbed proteins. In this work, we demonstrate the identification of proteins adsorbed on self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). Our results show that the composition of proteins on the SAMs critically depends on the terminal groups of the molecules constituting the SAMs, indicating that the competitive adsorption of protein molecules is largely affected by protein-surface interaction. The method introduced here can provide vital information to clarify the mechanism underlying the responses of cells and tissues to biomaterials. View Full-Text
Keywords: protein identification; matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight; proteomics; quartz crystal microbalance; self-assembled monolayer protein identification; matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight; proteomics; quartz crystal microbalance; self-assembled monolayer
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hirohara, M.; Maekawa, T.; Mondarte, E.A.Q.; Nyu, T.; Mizushita, Y.; Hayashi, T. Proteomic Analysis of Biomaterial Surfaces after Contacting with Body Fluids by MALDI-ToF Mass Spectroscopy. Coatings 2020, 10, 12.

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