Special Issue "Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis in Children"

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 September 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Steven R. Feldman
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Dermatology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, 4618 Country Club Road, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27104, USA
Interests: psoriasis; atopic dermatitis; acne; treatment adherence; health service research
Dr. Lindsay C. Strowd
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Dermatology, Wake Forest School of Medicine,4618 Country Club Road, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27104, USA
Interests: cutaneous lymphoma; acne; sarcoidosis; atopic dermatitis; hair loss; pyoderma gangrenosum; calciphylaxis; lupus; pemphigus

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Skin disease can have an enormous impact on patients’ lives. When skin diseases affect children, there can be reductions on the child’s quality of life and that of the entire family. Moreover, the impact of skin disease can accumulate over time, affecting sleep, education, psychological well-being, and life-choices.

Atopic dermatitis and psoriasis are common inflammatory skin disease that can affect children, particularly commonly in the case of atopic dermatitis. These two skin disease can manifest in a host of different way, creating considerable complexity for treatment planning. Moreover, while most children with these conditions have limited disease that can be treated with topical treatments, topical treatments can be time consuming, messy and, to parents, scary, leading to poor adherence.

This issue of Children focuses on atopic dermatitis and psoriasis in children. The issue covers the treatment of common forms of these conditions as well as advancements in treatment that are providing life changing treatments for children with previously devastating disease. Moreover, the principles and approaches for improving adherence to treatment presented in this issue are widely applicable the care of children with any disease.

Dr. Steven R. Feldman
Dr. Lindsay C. Strowd
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • psoriasis
  • atopic dermatitis
  • eczema
  • skin disease
  • quality of life
  • treatment adherence
  • dupilumab
  • topical corticosteroids
  • topical immunomodulators
  • crisaborole

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Topical and Oral Therapies for Childhood Atopic Dermatitis and Plaque Psoriasis
Children 2019, 6(11), 125; https://doi.org/10.3390/children6110125 - 05 Nov 2019
Abstract
Background: Treatment of atopic dermatitis and psoriasis in children is difficult due to lack of standardized treatment guidelines and few FDA-approved treatment options. Treatments approved for adults may be used off-label in pediatric patients. Objective: This review evaluates the topical and oral treatment [...] Read more.
Background: Treatment of atopic dermatitis and psoriasis in children is difficult due to lack of standardized treatment guidelines and few FDA-approved treatment options. Treatments approved for adults may be used off-label in pediatric patients. Objective: This review evaluates the topical and oral treatment options available, including off-label uses, and provides a basic therapeutic guideline for pediatric atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Methods: A PubMed review of topical and systemic treatments for pediatric psoriasis and atopic dermatitis with information regarding age, efficacy, dosing, contra-indications, adverse events, and off-label treatments. Results: The search identified seven topical and five systemic treatments that are routinely employed to treat pediatric atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Limitations: Standardized guidelines regarding treatment choice, dosing, and long-term safety are scarce. Reviews may be subject to ascertainment bias. Conclusions: Current treatment guidelines are based on clinical experience and expert advice with few treatments officially approved for atopic dermatitis and psoriasis in children. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis in Children)
Open AccessArticle
Pathophysiology of Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis: Implications for Management in Children
Children 2019, 6(10), 108; https://doi.org/10.3390/children6100108 - 04 Oct 2019
Abstract
Atopic dermatitis (AD) and psoriasis are chronic inflammatory skin diseases associated with a significant cutaneous and systemic burden of disease as well as a poor health-related quality of life. Here, we review the complex pathophysiology of both AD and psoriasis and discuss the [...] Read more.
Atopic dermatitis (AD) and psoriasis are chronic inflammatory skin diseases associated with a significant cutaneous and systemic burden of disease as well as a poor health-related quality of life. Here, we review the complex pathophysiology of both AD and psoriasis and discuss the implications for treatment with current state-of-the-art and emerging topical and systemic therapies. Both AD and psoriasis are caused by a complex combination of immune dysregulation, skin-barrier disruption, genetic factors, and environmental influences. Previous treatments for both diseases were limited to anti-inflammatory agents that broadly suppress inflammation. Emerging insights into relevant pathways, including recognition of the role of T-helper type 2 driven inflammation in AD and T-helper 1 and 17 driven inflammation in psoriasis, have led to a therapeutic revolution. There are a number of novel treatment options available for AD and psoriasis with many more currently under investigation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis in Children)
Open AccessCommunication
New Cosmetic Formulation for the Treatment of Mild to Moderate Infantile Atopic Dermatitis
Children 2019, 6(2), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/children6020017 - 29 Jan 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic cutaneous inflammatory disorder, characterized by skin barrier disruption. Dermacare is a new cosmetic formulation, which enhances moisturization, reinforces and repairs the skin barrier, and prevents cutaneous microbiota imbalance. To demonstrate its safety and efficacy, a prospective, open-label, [...] Read more.
Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic cutaneous inflammatory disorder, characterized by skin barrier disruption. Dermacare is a new cosmetic formulation, which enhances moisturization, reinforces and repairs the skin barrier, and prevents cutaneous microbiota imbalance. To demonstrate its safety and efficacy, a prospective, open-label, and multicenter study was carried out on patients diagnosed with mild to moderate AD. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL), clinical severity, Desquamation Index, Patient/Investigator Global Assessments, quality of life index, and tolerance were assessed. Adverse events were recorded. Daily application of the new treatment was well tolerated, and adverse events were absent. After 14 days, TEWL showed a 36.7% significant decrease (p = 0.035). At the end of the 28-day treatment, the Desquamation Index showed a reduction in 70% of patients; Eczema Area and Severity Index were reduced by 70.4% (p = 0.002); and skin irritation showed a significant reduction (p = 0.024). Likewise, Patient and Investigator Global Assessments reported a significant improvement in conditions and an overall global worsening when patients restarted their normal treatment. Parent’s Index of Quality of Life Index significantly increased by 36.4% (p < 0.05) with Dermacare. In conclusion, a regular use of this new formulation can reduce the risk of relapse and extend the steroid-free treatment periods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis in Children)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Quality of Life and Disease Impact of Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis on Children and Their Families
Children 2019, 6(12), 133; https://doi.org/10.3390/children6120133 - 02 Dec 2019
Abstract
Atopic dermatitis (AD) and psoriasis are common chronic skin diseases affecting children. These disorders negatively impact the quality of life (QoL) of patients in health-related aspects such as physical, psychosocial, and mental functioning. This health impact is more accurately represented when accounting for [...] Read more.
Atopic dermatitis (AD) and psoriasis are common chronic skin diseases affecting children. These disorders negatively impact the quality of life (QoL) of patients in health-related aspects such as physical, psychosocial, and mental functioning. This health impact is more accurately represented when accounting for the numerous comorbidities associated with each disorder, and the impact the disorders have on patients’ families. A number of QoL tools have been developed and can be routinely implemented in the evaluation of QoL in pediatric patients and their caregivers. Ways to improve QoL include a multidisciplinary approach to care, education, and psychological support. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis in Children)
Open AccessReview
Complementary and Integrative Therapies for Childhood Atopic Dermatitis
Children 2019, 6(11), 121; https://doi.org/10.3390/children6110121 - 30 Oct 2019
Abstract
Background: Childhood atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition that causes significant psychological and financial costs to the individual and society. Treatment regimens may require long-term medication adherence and can be associated with poor patient satisfaction. There is considerable interest in complementary [...] Read more.
Background: Childhood atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition that causes significant psychological and financial costs to the individual and society. Treatment regimens may require long-term medication adherence and can be associated with poor patient satisfaction. There is considerable interest in complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) approaches for childhood atopic dermatitis. Objective: To assess the effects of CIM approaches on childhood atopic dermatitis outcomes as defined by randomized, controlled clinical trials. Methods: A PubMed review of CIM-related treatments for pediatric atopic dermatitis was performed, and data related to age, study population, efficacy, treatment regimen, length of treatment, and sample size were included. Results: The search yielded 20 trials related to probiotic/prebiotic treatments for atopic dermatitis, three on the effects of vitamins on children with atopic dermatitis, and two on the effects of Chinese herbal treatments for atopic dermatitis in children and adolescents. The strongest evidence was for supplementation with the probiotics L. fermentum and L. plantarum. Conclusions: Certain strains of probiotics, specifically L. plantarum and L. fermentum, may improve clinical severity scores in children with atopic dermatitis. However, additional trials are needed to more thoroughly delineate the effects of additional integrative therapies on childhood atopic dermatitis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis in Children)
Open AccessReview
Biologic Treatment Options for Pediatric Psoriasis and Atopic Dermatitis
Children 2019, 6(9), 103; https://doi.org/10.3390/children6090103 - 11 Sep 2019
Abstract
Background and Objectives: Severe, recalcitrant cases of pediatric psoriasis or atopic dermatitis may necessitate treatment with biological agents; however, this may be difficult due to lack of treatment options and standardized treatment guidelines. This review evaluates the biological treatment options available, including off-label [...] Read more.
Background and Objectives: Severe, recalcitrant cases of pediatric psoriasis or atopic dermatitis may necessitate treatment with biological agents; however, this may be difficult due to lack of treatment options and standardized treatment guidelines. This review evaluates the biological treatment options available, including off-label uses, and provides a basic therapeutic guideline for pediatric psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Materials and Methods: A PubMed review of biological treatments for pediatric psoriasis and atopic dermatitis with information regarding age, efficacy, dosing, contra-indications, adverse events, and off-label treatments. Results: Currently there are three European Medicines Agency (EMA)-approved biological treatment options for pediatric psoriasis: etanercept, ustekinumab, and adalimumab. While dupilumab was recently Food and Drug Administration (FDA)- and EMA-approved for adult atopic dermatitis, it is still not yet approved for pediatric atopic dermatitis. Conclusions: Given the high morbidity associated with pediatric atopic dermatitis and psoriasis, there is a need for more treatment options. Further research and post-marketing registries are needed to extend the use of biologics into pediatric patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis in Children)
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