Special Issue "Medical Statistics and Clinical Epidemiology in Children"

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This special issue belongs to the section "Global and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 February 2023 | Viewed by 979

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Angela Alibrandi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Economical, Business and Environmental Sciences and Quantitative Methods, University of Messina, Messina, Italy
Interests: medical statistics; clinical epidemiology; pediatrics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I am pleased to invite you to present a scientific contribution in this Special Issue, aimed at collecting valuable articles in which biostatistics plays a fundamental role in all levels of at biomedical research: from the organization of data and the choice of the research design to the data collection and the hypothesis verification procedure. In addition, the theory of statistical inference allows and guarantees the extensibility of the conclusions of a clinical study conducted on a sample to a reference population, under specific conditions related to probability sampling. The task of the biostatistician in the field of clinical research is to support researchers in designing, managing, analyzing, interpreting and evaluating experimental or observational studies on the basis of compliance with the methodology. In this context, we want to focus on children, offering an opportunity to collect contributions from biostatistics in pediatric research.

Dr. Angela Alibrandi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biostatistics
  • clinical epidemiology
  • inference procedure
  • data analysis
  • parametric and non-parametric tests
  • statistical models
  • childhood

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Burden of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Related Acute Lower Respiratory Tract Infection in Hospitalized Thai Children: A 6-Year National Data Analysis
Children 2022, 9(12), 1990; https://doi.org/10.3390/children9121990 - 17 Dec 2022
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Abstract
Objectives: This study sought to determine the epidemiology, seasonal variations, morbidity, and mortality of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection among hospitalized children with lower respiratory tract infection in Thailand. In addition, we assessed the risk factors associated with severe RSV lower respiratory tract [...] Read more.
Objectives: This study sought to determine the epidemiology, seasonal variations, morbidity, and mortality of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection among hospitalized children with lower respiratory tract infection in Thailand. In addition, we assessed the risk factors associated with severe RSV lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI)-related morbidity and mortality. Methods: The data were reviewed retrospectively from the National Health Security Office for hospitalized children younger than 18 years old diagnosed with RSV-related LRTI in Thailand, between the fiscal years of 2015 to 2020. The RSV-related LRTIs were identified using the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision, Thai Modification. ICD-10-TM codes J12.1, J20.5, and J21.0, which represent respiratory syncytial virus pneumonia, acute bronchitis due to respiratory syncytial virus, and acute bronchiolitis due to respiratory syncytial virus, respectively, were studied. Results: During the study period, RSV-related LRTI accounted for 19,340 of the 1,610,160 hospital admissions due to LRTI. RSV pneumonia was the leading cause of hospitalization (13,684/19,340; 70.76%), followed by bronchiolitis (2849/19,340; 14.73%) and bronchitis (2807/19,340; 14.51%), respectively. The highest peak incidence of 73.55 percent occurred during Thailand’s rainy season, from August to October. The mortality rate of RSV-related LRTI in infants younger than 1 year of age was 1.75 per 100,000 person years, which was significantly higher than that of children 1 to younger than 5 years old and children 5 to younger than 18 years old (0.21 per 100,000 person years and 0.01 per 100,000 person years, respectively, p-value < 0.001). Factors associated with mortality were congenital heart disease, hematologic malignancy, malnutrition, and neurological disease. Conclusions: In children with RSV LRTI, pneumonia was the leading cause of hospitalization. The admission rate was highest during the rainy season. Mortality from RSV-related LRTI was higher in children under 1 year old and in children with underlying illnesses; future preventive interventions should target these groups of patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medical Statistics and Clinical Epidemiology in Children)
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