Eating Disorders and Obesity in Children and Adolescents

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This special issue belongs to the section "Global and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 October 2022) | Viewed by 56890

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Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Health, Madrid Open University, Carretera de La Coruña, KM.38,500, Vía de, Servicio, nº 15, 28400 Collado Villalba, Madrid, Spain
Interests: eating disorders; obesity; body image; clinical psycology; health
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Eating disorders continue to be one of the disorders with the highest prevalence among children and adolescents, especially in women. Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa are the main disorders at this stage of life. Binge-eating disorder is also highly prevalent, but mainly among adults. Eating disorders occur with significant comorbidity and are diseases that seriously alter the lives of children and adolescents who suffer from them, with important consequences for adult life. Mortality rates in patients with eating disorders are high and especially those with Anorexia Nervosa, especially among adolescent women. We need to broaden our knowledge of these disorders to reduce the impact among adolescents, either through preventive strategies or by improving treatments. The identification of risk factors or risk indicators has in recent years become a main objective in the investigation of these disorders.

In this Special Issue of Children, papers that explore the etiology, prevalence, symptoms, risk factors, evaluation strategies, treatments, psychosocial or biomedical consequences, and any other aspect from a medical, nutritional, psychological, psychiatric or social point of view of eating disorders in children and adolescents are welcome. The format of the papers may include original research, systematic literature reviews, narrative reviews, and case reports.

I look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. José Ignacio Baile Ayensa
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • Eating disorders
  • Anorexia Nervosa
  • Bulimia Nervosa
  • Binge-eating disorder
  • Obesity
  • Children
  • Adolescents

Published Papers (15 papers)

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Editorial

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2 pages, 190 KiB  
Editorial
Introduction to the Special Issue on Eating Disorders and Obesity in Children and Adolescents
by José I. Baile
Children 2021, 8(11), 1065; https://doi.org/10.3390/children8111065 - 19 Nov 2021
Viewed by 1416
Abstract
In this Special Issue of Children, we can find several articles that present the results of various current investigations in the field of eating disorders and obesity in children and adolescents [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eating Disorders and Obesity in Children and Adolescents)

Research

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12 pages, 679 KiB  
Article
The Association between Stress and Children’s Weight Status: A School-Based, Epidemiological Study
by Aikaterini Kanellopoulou, Christina Vassou, Ekaterina N. Kornilaki, Venetia Notara, George Antonogeorgos, Andrea Paola Rojas-Gil, Areti Lagiou, Mary Yannakoulia and Demosthenes B. Panagiotakos
Children 2022, 9(7), 1066; https://doi.org/10.3390/children9071066 - 17 Jul 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1613
Abstract
Given the evidence on how stress affects weight status in children, this research examined this association among Greek students aged 10–12 years old. Overall, 1452 children and their parents from several urban areas participated in an observational study conducted during the period 2014–2016. [...] Read more.
Given the evidence on how stress affects weight status in children, this research examined this association among Greek students aged 10–12 years old. Overall, 1452 children and their parents from several urban areas participated in an observational study conducted during the period 2014–2016. Participants completed validated questionnaires. International Obesity Task Force guidelines were used for children’s weight status classification. Descriptive statistics and nested logistic regression models were used. Multivariate correspondence analysis was also used to construct a score to evaluate the children’s stress levels. The overall prevalence of overweight/obesity was 27%. More than 80% of the children appeared to have a medium or high level of stress, mainly due to the school environment. School-related stress increased the odds of obesity in children. The association between stress and overweight/obesity status showed a consistent trend (adjusted odds ratios varied from 1.44 to 1.52, p-values < 0.01). Children’s weight status was associated with several school-related stressors. Although the school environment may play an aggravating role in the weight status of children, family plays a catalyst role in this direction. Therefore, actions have to be promoted in the school community so that children become more health literate on a public health level. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eating Disorders and Obesity in Children and Adolescents)
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13 pages, 278 KiB  
Article
Relationship between Risk Factors Related to Eating Disorders and Subjective Health and Oral Health
by Eun-Ha Jung and Mi-Kyoung Jun
Children 2022, 9(6), 786; https://doi.org/10.3390/children9060786 - 26 May 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1564
Abstract
This study examined the factors related to eating disorders (ED) and the relationship between ED and subjective health or subjective oral health in adolescents. The 46,146 adolescents (age 12–18 years) who participated in the Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey were selected, including [...] Read more.
This study examined the factors related to eating disorders (ED) and the relationship between ED and subjective health or subjective oral health in adolescents. The 46,146 adolescents (age 12–18 years) who participated in the Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey were selected, including those who had attempted to lose weight within the past 30 days during the survey period. The variables included were eating behavior, BMI, body image subjective health, and subjective oral health. The weight-loss method was divided into two groups (regular exercise, RE, and eating disorder, ED). The data were analyzed using the Rao-Scott χ2 test and logistic regression analysis. The adolescents with an obese body image had a lower risk of ED (OR = 0.75, 95% CI 0.38–1.49) than adolescents with a very thin body image. Adolescents with ED had a higher risk of a poor subjective health assessment (OR = 2.32, 95% CI 1.85–2.91). On the other hand, they had a lower risk of a poor subjective oral health assessment (OR = 0.89, 95% CI 0.71–1.12). ED is closely associated with eating behavior, BMI, body image, oral health behavior, subjective health, and subjective oral health in Korean adolescents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eating Disorders and Obesity in Children and Adolescents)
13 pages, 1188 KiB  
Article
Cardiac Remodeling and Its Determinants in Anorexia Nervosa Adolescents: Impact of Weight Recovery
by Justine Paysal, Jérôme Thireau, Daniel Terral, Emmanuelle Rochette, Philippe Obert, Etienne Merlin and Stéphane Nottin
Children 2022, 9(4), 458; https://doi.org/10.3390/children9040458 - 24 Mar 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1553
Abstract
Cardiovascular alterations in anorexia nervosa (AN) adolescents include bradycardia and decreased systolic blood pressure and left ventricular mass. However, their determinants remain poorly understood. We assessed the associations between morphological and functional left ventricular (LV) remodeling, autonomic control by heart rate variability (HRV) [...] Read more.
Cardiovascular alterations in anorexia nervosa (AN) adolescents include bradycardia and decreased systolic blood pressure and left ventricular mass. However, their determinants remain poorly understood. We assessed the associations between morphological and functional left ventricular (LV) remodeling, autonomic control by heart rate variability (HRV) analysis, thyroid hormones and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels in AN female adolescents without or with weight recovery (WR). Fifty-nine female adolescents including 16 AN patients without WR (mean age 13.9 years (10–16)), 10 AN patients with WR (15.7 years (12–18)) and 33 controls (14.1 years (10–18)) underwent night heart rate (HR) recording to measure HRV (and especially SD1/SD2, the ratio between instantaneous (SD1) and long-term (SD2) standard deviation of R-R intervals, reflecting sympatho-vagal balance), speckle tracking echocardiography to assess LV global longitudinal strain (GLS) and blood test for dosage of tri-iodothyronine (T3) hormone and NT-proBNP. Compared to controls, AN patients without WR presented with lower HR (55 ± 7 vs. 68 ± 6 bpm; p < 0.001), parasympathetic hyperactivity, and higher GLS (−19.2 ± 1.8 vs. −16.9 ± 2.8%; p = 0.009). These alterations were partly abolished in AN patients with WR. In a multivariate regression analysis, T3 was the main factor explaining the variance of SD1/SD2, a sympatho-vagal balance marker. NT-proBNP levels were not correlated with cardiac alterations. AN patients had parasympathetic hyperactivity linked with their rate of T3, and a higher GLS. These alterations were partly restored in AN patients with WR. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eating Disorders and Obesity in Children and Adolescents)
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12 pages, 3720 KiB  
Article
Multi-Validity Process and Factor-Invariance. Perceived Self-Efficacy-Scale for the Prevention of Obesity in Preteens
by Gilda Gómez-Peresmitré, Romana Silvia Platas Acevedo, Gisela Pineda-García, Rebeca Guzmán-Saldaña, Rodrigo Cesar León-Hernández and Nazira Calleja
Children 2021, 8(6), 504; https://doi.org/10.3390/children8060504 - 14 Jun 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1961
Abstract
Given the lack of scales with a robust psychometric assessment of self-efficacy related to obesity in early adolescence, we aimed to obtain an instrument with high-quality validity and reliability items. Nonrandom samples (N = 2371) classified boys (1174, M = 12.83, SD [...] Read more.
Given the lack of scales with a robust psychometric assessment of self-efficacy related to obesity in early adolescence, we aimed to obtain an instrument with high-quality validity and reliability items. Nonrandom samples (N = 2371) classified boys (1174, M = 12.83, SD = 0.84) and girls (1197, M = 12.68, SD = 0.78) from Mexico City and some cities of the Mexican Republic with obesity rates near to the national level mean. A multi-validity process and structural invariance analysis using the Perceived Self-efficacy Scale for Obesity Prevention were performed. A two-factor—physical activity and healthy eating—model with high effect-sized values—girls R2 (0.88, p < 0.01) and boys R2 (0.87, p < 0.01)—were obtained. Each factor explained more than half of the variance with high-reliability coefficients in each group and acceptable adjustment rates. The self-efficacy scale proved to have only girls, an invariant factor structure, or a psychometric equivalence between the groups. The obtained scale showed that a two-factor structure is feasible and appropriate, according to the highest quality of validity and reliability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eating Disorders and Obesity in Children and Adolescents)
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15 pages, 268 KiB  
Article
Feeding Problems in Typically Developing Young Children, a Population-Based Study
by Katerina Sdravou, Maria Fotoulaki, Elpida Emmanouilidou-Fotoulaki, Elias Andreoulakis, Giorgos Makris, Fotini Sotiriadou and Athanasia Printza
Children 2021, 8(5), 388; https://doi.org/10.3390/children8050388 - 13 May 2021
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 3805
Abstract
Feeding problems have been estimated to occur in approximately 25–45% of normally developing children. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of feeding problems in typically developing young children in Greece. Child feeding behavior, parents’ feelings about their child’s feeding [...] Read more.
Feeding problems have been estimated to occur in approximately 25–45% of normally developing children. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of feeding problems in typically developing young children in Greece. Child feeding behavior, parents’ feelings about their child’s feeding patterns, and parental feeding practices were also explored. Parents completed the Greek version of the Behavioral Pediatrics Feeding Assessment Scale (BPFAS). Data on 742 healthy, typically developing children aged two to seven years are presented. Overall, the majority of children in the sample showed high frequency of desirable mealtime behaviors and low frequency of undesirable mealtime behaviors. However, a significant proportion of the cohort presented with food neophobia and low consumption of vegetables. When applying test cut-off scores, it was found that 8.2% of the sample had abnormal Total Frequency Score (TFS) and 26.6% had abnormal Total Problem Score (TPS). The study showed that parent-reported feeding problems are quite common in children of typical development in Greece. Moreover, while the majority of the sample displayed a high frequency of favorable behaviors, specific child feeding behaviors are amenable to improvement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eating Disorders and Obesity in Children and Adolescents)
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10 pages, 541 KiB  
Article
Eating Disorders in Top Elite Beach Handball Players: Cross Sectional Study
by Alejandro Martínez-Rodríguez, Manuel Vicente-Martínez, Javier Sánchez-Sánchez, Laura Miralles-Amorós, María Martínez-Olcina and Juan Antonio Sánchez-Sáez
Children 2021, 8(3), 245; https://doi.org/10.3390/children8030245 - 22 Mar 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2860
Abstract
(1) Background: The preoccupation with the increasing appearance of eating disorders (ED) in athletes continues to grow, especially in athletes who practice team sports. ED severely affects the eating habits of the athletes, who tend to use unhealthy approaches to control their body [...] Read more.
(1) Background: The preoccupation with the increasing appearance of eating disorders (ED) in athletes continues to grow, especially in athletes who practice team sports. ED severely affects the eating habits of the athletes, who tend to use unhealthy approaches to control their body weight. The development of nutritional education and early interventions by training staff is essential, and these factors are widely perceived as beneficial in sports medicine. This study evaluates the frequency at which beach handball (BH) players develop ED, also comparing the differences by sex and age (junior: adolescents vs. senior: young adults). In addition, the relation between body composition variables and ED was studied. (2) Methods: A descriptive and cross-sectional study was carried out in 69 top elite handball players (36 males and 33 females) from the Spanish National BH Team; who were separated by age (junior: adolescents and senior: young adults). The athletes completed the Eating Attitudes Test in its 26 item version (EAT-26). (3) Results: The prevalence of ED indicated that 11% of females had a high possibility of developing an ED, and 3% of males. Regarding the EAT-26 total score and subscales, no significant differences were found between female and male participants, or between the junior and senior categories. The correlations showed an association between body composition, in terms of body mass index, and the EAT-26 total score in both males and females. In the case of males, the correlation was negative. (4) Conclusions: Although there are no significant differences between sex or categories, it has been found that elite athletes are a population that is at high risk of developing ED. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eating Disorders and Obesity in Children and Adolescents)
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11 pages, 305 KiB  
Article
Linking Psychosocial Stress Events, Psychological Disorders and Childhood Obesity
by Marta Rojo, Santos Solano, Tatiana Lacruz, José I. Baile, Miriam Blanco, Montserrat Graell and Ana Rosa Sepúlveda
Children 2021, 8(3), 211; https://doi.org/10.3390/children8030211 - 10 Mar 2021
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 2931
Abstract
There is scientific evidence that supports a strong association between early exposure to stressful life events and the presence of health complications throughout adulthood and, to a lesser extent, in adolescence and childhood. The aim of this study was to examine the accumulation [...] Read more.
There is scientific evidence that supports a strong association between early exposure to stressful life events and the presence of health complications throughout adulthood and, to a lesser extent, in adolescence and childhood. The aim of this study was to examine the accumulation of Psychosocial Stress Events (PSE) and the prevalence of mental disorders in children from 8 to 12 years. The association between these factors and child weight measurements was analysed. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 200 children classified by weight status (obesity, overweight and normal-weight). The assessment was carried out in primary care centres and primary schools. An experienced team carried out a structured medical-psychosocial history and a semi-structured interview aimed at identifying an early diagnosis of psychological disorders. Children filled out a questionnaire to evaluate PSE. The obesity group presented the greatest accumulation of PSE and highest prevalence of psychiatric diagnosis, compared to overweight and normal-weight children. To exceed four or more stressful events was positively associated with psychological problems and child body mass index (BMI z-score). A predictive model confirmed the interaction between a larger number of PSE and the occurrence of a psychiatric diagnosis as variables that predispose children by 26.2 times more to increased weight status. In conclusion, the accumulation of PSE in the family, school and social environments of the children was related to greater psychological distress. If not managed, the likelihood of suffering from other health complications, such as excess weight, may increase. It is important to monitor these variables to ensure positive health outcomes while specifically addressing childhood obesity. This is especially relevant for children from a disadvantaged social background and disharmonious family environments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eating Disorders and Obesity in Children and Adolescents)
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14 pages, 323 KiB  
Article
Psychopathological Risk Factors Associated with Body Image, Body Dissatisfaction and Weight-Loss Dieting in School-Age Adolescents
by Antonio S. Cabaco, José D. Urchaga, Raquel M. Guevara and José E. Moral-García
Children 2021, 8(2), 105; https://doi.org/10.3390/children8020105 - 04 Feb 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3115
Abstract
Determining the comorbidity patterns leading to suffering behavioural eating disorders (BED) that are identifiable in the early stages of life, can help prevent their becoming chronic, as well as preventing the consequences deriving from the cost and effectiveness of intervention programs. The paper [...] Read more.
Determining the comorbidity patterns leading to suffering behavioural eating disorders (BED) that are identifiable in the early stages of life, can help prevent their becoming chronic, as well as preventing the consequences deriving from the cost and effectiveness of intervention programs. The paper focuses mainly on analysing the association between behavioural/emotional risk factors and body image, body satisfaction and diet in school children, as well as confirming whether there are differences based on sex. Several questionnaires (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire and several items of Health Behaviour in School-age Children) including these variables were distributed and completed by the 647 adolescents (16 year olds on average) who took part in the research project. The findings confirmed a differentiated risk profile in adolescent girls in that they had greater prevalence of emotional symptoms as a general psychopathological trait, although this was offset with their prosocial behaviour. Additionally, the findings also allowed us to conclude that the factors that predict vulnerability to BEDs are sex, the presence of emotional symptoms and social and behavioural issues. At the end of this paper, we discuss some implications and consequences that should be taken into account for future work. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eating Disorders and Obesity in Children and Adolescents)
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15 pages, 301 KiB  
Article
Mealtime Environment and Control of Food Intake in Healthy Children and in Children with Gastrointestinal Diseases
by Katerina Sdravou, Elpida Emmanouilidou-Fotoulaki, Athanasia Printza, Elias Andreoulakis, Athanasios Evangeliou and Maria Fotoulaki
Children 2021, 8(2), 77; https://doi.org/10.3390/children8020077 - 23 Jan 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2949
Abstract
Parental feeding practices and mealtime routine significantly influence a child’s eating behavior. The aim of this study was to investigate the mealtime environment in healthy children and children with gastrointestinal diseases. We conducted a cross-sectional case–control study among 787 healthy, typically developing children [...] Read more.
Parental feeding practices and mealtime routine significantly influence a child’s eating behavior. The aim of this study was to investigate the mealtime environment in healthy children and children with gastrointestinal diseases. We conducted a cross-sectional case–control study among 787 healthy, typically developing children and 141 children with gastrointestinal diseases, aged two to seven years. Parents were asked to provide data on demographics and describe their mealtime environment by answering to 24 closed-ended questions. It was found that the majority of the children had the same number of meals every day and at the same hour. Parents of both groups exerted considerable control on the child’s food intake by deciding both when and what their child eats. Almost one third of the parents also decided how much their child eats. The two groups differed significantly in nine of the 24 questions. The study showed that both groups provided structured and consistent mealtime environments. However, a significant proportion of children did not control how much they eat which might impede their ability to self-regulate eating. The presence of a gastrointestinal disease was found to be associated with reduced child autonomy, hampered hunger cues and frequent use of distractions during meals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eating Disorders and Obesity in Children and Adolescents)
10 pages, 287 KiB  
Article
Child Trauma Experiences and Dissociative Symptoms in Women with Eating Disorders: Case-Control Study
by María F. Rabito-Alcón, José I. Baile and Johan Vanderlinden
Children 2020, 7(12), 274; https://doi.org/10.3390/children7120274 - 05 Dec 2020
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3892
Abstract
Background: many people with different diagnoses, including eating disorders, have suffered traumatic experiences in childhood. Method: a case-control study was performed. The objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of child trauma and dissociative symptoms in people with eating disorders and [...] Read more.
Background: many people with different diagnoses, including eating disorders, have suffered traumatic experiences in childhood. Method: a case-control study was performed. The objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of child trauma and dissociative symptoms in people with eating disorders and compare the results obtained with a control group. Participants were administered the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) and the Structured Clinical Interview for Personality Disorders (SCID-II) to confirm diagnostic criteria and explore possible comorbidities. Traumatic experiences in childhood were evaluated with the Child Trauma Questionnaire in its abbreviated version (CTQ-SF), psychoform dissociation was measured with the Scale of Dissociative Experiences (DES-II) and somatoform dissociation with the Somatoform Dissociation Scale (SDQ-20). Results: women with eating disorders reported a greater severity and higher prevalence of child trauma than the control group. Significant differences were found by groups in dissociative symptoms. Conclusions: our results, in a Spanish sample, confirm the findings of previous studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eating Disorders and Obesity in Children and Adolescents)
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13 pages, 4059 KiB  
Article
Identifying Loss of Control Eating within Childhood Obesity: The Importance of Family Environment and Child Psychological Distress
by Ana Rosa Sepúlveda, Tatiana Lacruz, Santos Solano, Miriam Blanco, Alba Moreno, Marta Rojo, Lucía Beltrán and Montserrat Graell
Children 2020, 7(11), 225; https://doi.org/10.3390/children7110225 - 11 Nov 2020
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3043
Abstract
This study aims to examine the differences in family environment, psychological distress, and disordered eating symptomatology between children classified by weight status with or without loss of control (LOC) eating and to test a model of the role of emotional regulation of LOC [...] Read more.
This study aims to examine the differences in family environment, psychological distress, and disordered eating symptomatology between children classified by weight status with or without loss of control (LOC) eating and to test a model of the role of emotional regulation of LOC eating based on a dysfunctional family environment. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 239 families. The assessment measured family expressed emotion, family adaptability and cohesion, child levels of depression and anxiety, body esteem, and disordered eating attitudes. The assessment was carried out in primary care centers and primary schools. Child body mass index (BMI) was associated with higher expressed emotion, psychological distress, and disordered eating symptomatology. Children with obesity and LOC presented higher BMI, poorer body esteem, and more disordered eating attitudes than children without LOC. Children with overweight/obesity, both with or without LOC, exhibited higher psychological distress and emotional overinvolvement than normal-weight children. A partial mediation of depression or anxiety and disordered eating attitudes between expressed emotion and LOC was found. Findings support that children with overweight/obesity show more family and psychological distress. Body esteem issues and disordered eating attitudes could alert the presence of LOC in children with obesity. The function of LOC might be to cope with psychological distress that may appear in a dysfunctional family environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eating Disorders and Obesity in Children and Adolescents)
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19 pages, 822 KiB  
Article
Effects of Social Media and Smartphone Use on Body Esteem in Female Adolescents: Testing a Cognitive and Affective Model
by Hwajin Yang, Joy Jiaqi Wang, Germaine Y. Q. Tng and Sujin Yang
Children 2020, 7(9), 148; https://doi.org/10.3390/children7090148 - 21 Sep 2020
Cited by 29 | Viewed by 14388
Abstract
We examined the predictive relations of social media and smartphone use to body esteem in female adolescents and the mechanism that underlies these relations. As a result of frequent social media and smartphone use, adolescents are continually exposed to appearance-related media content. This [...] Read more.
We examined the predictive relations of social media and smartphone use to body esteem in female adolescents and the mechanism that underlies these relations. As a result of frequent social media and smartphone use, adolescents are continually exposed to appearance-related media content. This likely reinforces a thin ideal and fosters appearance-based comparison and increases fear of external evaluation. Hence, we investigated a cognitive-affective framework in which the associations of social media and smartphone use with body esteem are serially mediated by cognitive internalization of an ideal body image, appearance comparisons, and social appearance anxiety. By testing female adolescents (N = 100) aged 13 to 18, we found that excessive social media use leads to unhealthy body esteem via intensified cognitive internalization, which aggravates appearance comparisons and anxiety regarding negative appearance evaluation. Further, we found that screen time for specific smartphone activities also harmed body esteem, independent of social media use. However, overall smartphone screen time did not affect body esteem when social media use was taken into consideration. Our findings underscore the multifactor mechanism that elucidates the negative impacts of social media and smartphone activities on body esteem in female adolescents, who are developmentally susceptible to poor body esteem. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eating Disorders and Obesity in Children and Adolescents)
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Review

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12 pages, 723 KiB  
Review
Mediating Factors between Childhood Traumatic Experiences and Eating Disorders Development: A Systematic Review
by María F. Rabito-Alcón, José I. Baile and Johan Vanderlinden
Children 2021, 8(2), 114; https://doi.org/10.3390/children8020114 - 06 Feb 2021
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 5667
Abstract
Background: Many people with eating disorders often report having suffered some kind of childhood trauma. For this reason, many studies have attempted to explore the mediating factors between traumatic experiences and the development of eating disorders. The aim of our study is to [...] Read more.
Background: Many people with eating disorders often report having suffered some kind of childhood trauma. For this reason, many studies have attempted to explore the mediating factors between traumatic experiences and the development of eating disorders. The aim of our study is to conduct a systematic review of published works on the mediating factors between childhood trauma and the development of eating disorders. Method: This review was carried out up to 5 December, 2020, using the databases PsycInfo and PubMed, combining the keywords, and applying a set of inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results: A total of 18 articles were retrieved. After the articles were analyzed, a set of mediating factors between childhood trauma and the development of eating disorders was established, including pathological dissociation, difficulty with emotion self-regulation, body dissatisfaction, negative affect/depression, anxiety, general distress, self-criticism, and alexithymia, among others. Conclusions: In addition to evaluating trauma in eating disorders, these results highlight the importance of paying special attention to the presence of various possible mediating factors, which must be taken into account in the planning of therapeutic treatment. Identifying symptoms of trauma or eating disorders early on could prevent onset of more severe psychopathology during adulthood. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eating Disorders and Obesity in Children and Adolescents)
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Other

10 pages, 907 KiB  
Systematic Review
Individual Circadian Preference, Eating Disorders and Obesity in Children and Adolescents: A Dangerous Liaison? A Systematic Review and a Meta-Analysis
by Francisco José Rodríguez-Cortés, Ignacio Morales-Cané, Pedro Manuel Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rosaria Cappadona, Alfredo De Giorgi, Roberto Manfredini, María Aurora Rodríguez-Borrego, Fabio Fabbian and Pablo Jesús López-Soto
Children 2022, 9(2), 167; https://doi.org/10.3390/children9020167 - 28 Jan 2022
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 3487
Abstract
Background: Obesity and other eating disorders are an actual public health problem, especially in childhood and adolescents, and could be also related with chronotype. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the relationship between eating disorders, obesity and the different chronotypes [...] Read more.
Background: Obesity and other eating disorders are an actual public health problem, especially in childhood and adolescents, and could be also related with chronotype. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the relationship between eating disorders, obesity and the different chronotypes in children and adolescents. Methods: A systematic review of observational studies evaluating young populations dealing with and evaluating chronotype was conducted. Electronic searches were performed in six international databases. A qualitative thematic-categorical analysis was carried out and a random-effects model was used for the quantitative analysis (meta-analysis). Results: Fifteen studies were included, but quantitative analysis was only carried out in three of them. Children and adolescents with an evening chronotype had higher body mass index, consumed more junk food or were more predisposed to suffer from food addiction and night eating syndrome. Conclusions: Children and adolescents with evening chronotype had higher tendency to incorrect eating behaviors and were suffering from overweight/obesity. Environment but also lifestyle factors should be considered in the association between chronotype and eating disorders and obesity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eating Disorders and Obesity in Children and Adolescents)
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