Parenting and Child/Adolescent Development: Current Updates and Global Perspectives

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Pediatric Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 1659

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Demography, Institute for Population and Human Studies—Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1113 Sofia, Bulgaria
Interests: fertility and family studies; parenthood; family policies; child poverty and social exclusion; adolescent health; early childhood development and care; research methods in social sciences
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Preventive Medicine & Health Research Institute, Faculty of Public Health, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, A.Mickevičiaus 9, LT-44307 Kaunas, Lithuania
Interests: health behaviour of children and adolescents; family culture in health; inequalities in health; biostatistics (multilevel analysis and structural equation models)
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Family dynamics, parenting practices and parent/caregiver–child relationship have a formative effect and long-term implications for children’s health, well-being and socioemotional, cognitive, neurobiological development, also including later stages of life. Family connectedness, communication and relationships with parents and family members also provide important role models and contribute to the development of identity and the adoption of skills and behaviours in adolescence. This Special Issue takes a multidisciplinary stance and aims to collect theoretical, methodological and empirical papers on topics related to the influence of the family type, structure and family dynamics, the gendered aspect of parenting and care for children and adolescents, i.e. the role of mothers’ and fathers’ involvement and parenting practices, and their implications for child/adolescent development, health and well-being; the involvement of extended family members in care for children and adolescents; the role of the cultural practices of parenting in different social contexts; the role of the institutional and policy context, reflected in early childhood education and care (ECEC) policies, family and youth policies and services for families, children and adolescents.

Dr. Elitsa Dimitrova
Prof. Dr. Apolinaras Zaborskis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • child development
  • adolescent development
  • health, well-being and health behaviour of children and adolescents
  • family type, structure and family dynamics
  • parent–child/adolescent relationships
  • parenting practices and involvement in care for children and adolescents
  • gendered aspects of parenting and care for children and adolescents
  • generational aspects of care for children and adolescents
  • early childhood education and care (ECEC) policies, family and youth policies
  • services for families, children and adolescents

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

26 pages, 1693 KiB  
Article
Adaptation of the Coparenting Relationship Scale Questionnaire to Spanish Parents with Offspring
by Dolores Seijo, Francisca Fariña, María Paula Fernández and Ramón Arce
Children 2024, 11(5), 535; https://doi.org/10.3390/children11050535 - 30 Apr 2024
Viewed by 833
Abstract
The scientific literature supports that practicing positive coparenting leads to the healthy development of children. Consequently, professional interest in parenting and coparenting has experienced significant growth, and evaluating coparenting is crucial in family psychology for establishing action protocols in clinical practice. An instrument [...] Read more.
The scientific literature supports that practicing positive coparenting leads to the healthy development of children. Consequently, professional interest in parenting and coparenting has experienced significant growth, and evaluating coparenting is crucial in family psychology for establishing action protocols in clinical practice. An instrument highly regarded within the scientific community for evaluating coparenting dynamics is The Coparenting Relationship Scale (CRS). This research aims to achieve two objectives: first, to adapt the CRS for the Spanish population of both engaged and separated/divorced parents and to ascertain its reliability, validity, and factorial invariance psychometric properties; second, to assess the effectiveness of the total coparenting measure in categorizing sample participants. A cross-sectional non-experimental investigation was conducted to address these objectives. The first objective was answered by conducting an instrumental study, and the second by an exploratory study using classification techniques and a causal-comparative study using multivariate inferential methods. It was concluded that the model comprising 20 items across two factors, Positive Coparenting and Negative Perception of Coparenting, is the simplest and best fit for the Spanish parent sample; it is invariant regarding gender and marital status, and the measures derived from each factor demonstrate reliability and convergent and discriminant validity. The resulting questionnaire for Spanish parents is named CRS-SEg-S&D. The Coparental Vitality measure calculated using the total weighted measure of CRS-SEg-S&D allows the sample of participants to be divided into three differentiated clusters called Coparental Robustness, Moderate Coparenting, and Coparenting Rickets. Full article
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