Special Issue "Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms underlying the Pathogenesis of Hepatic Fibrosis II"

A special issue of Cells (ISSN 2073-4409). This special issue belongs to the section "Cellular Pathology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Ralf Weiskirchen
Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Molecular Pathobiochemistry, Experimental Gene Therapy and Clinical Chemistry (IFMPEGKC), University Hospital RWTH Aachen, D-52074 Aachen, Germany
Interests: functional aspects of PDGF and TGF-β signaling in hepatic fibrogenesis; novel therapeutic strategies for therapy of liver fibrosis; animal models of organ fibrosis; transcriptional targeting of profibrogenic cells; development and evaluation of novel biomarkers in hepatic fibrogenesis; general biomarker research; adenoviral expression technology
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The hallmark of hepatic fibrosis is the formation and deposition of excess fibrous connective tissue, leading to progressive architectural tissue remodeling. Irrespective of the underlying pathogenic cause (e.g., genetic disorders, viruses, alcohol, autoimmune attacks, metabolic disorders, cholestasis, venous obstruction, parasites), tissue damage induces an inflammatory response involving the local vascular system and the immune system and a systemic mobilization of endocrine and neurological mediators, ultimately leading to the activation of matrix-producing cell populations. In addition, excess fat and other lipotoxic mediators provoking endoplasmic reticulum stress, the alteration of mitochondrial function, oxidative stress, and modifications in the microbiota are associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and, subsequently, the initiation and/or progression of hepatic fibrosis.

In this Special Issue of Cells, I invite you to contribute original research articles, reviews, or shorter perspective articles on all aspects related to the theme of “Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Pathogenesis of Hepatic Fibrosis”. Expert articles describing mechanistic, functional, cellular, biochemical, or general aspects of hepatic fibrogenesis are highly welcome. Relevant topics include but are not limited to:

  • Cytokine signaling;
  • Chemokine function;
  • In vitro and in vivo models;
  • Immunology in hepatic fibrosis;
  • Extracellular matrix;
  • Inflammation;
  • Fibrosis;
  • NASH/NAFLD;
  • Alcohol;
  • Hepatitis;
  • Microbiota;
  • Bioimaging;
  • Translational medicine.

Prof. Ralf Weiskirchen
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Published Papers (13 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Phosphate Groups in the Lipid A Moiety Determine the Effects of LPS on Hepatic Stellate Cells: A Role for LPS-Dephosphorylating Activity in Liver Fibrosis
Cells 2020, 9(12), 2708; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9122708 - 17 Dec 2020
Abstract
Alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity is highly upregulated in plasma during liver diseases. Previously, we demonstrated that AP is able to detoxify lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by dephosphorylating its lipid A moiety. Because a role of gut-derived LPS in liver fibrogenesis has become evident, we now [...] Read more.
Alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity is highly upregulated in plasma during liver diseases. Previously, we demonstrated that AP is able to detoxify lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by dephosphorylating its lipid A moiety. Because a role of gut-derived LPS in liver fibrogenesis has become evident, we now examined the relevance of phosphate groups in the lipid A moiety in this process. The effects of mono-phosphoryl and di-phosphoryl lipid A (MPLA and DPLA, respectively) were studied in vitro and LPS-dephosphorylating activity was studied in normal and fibrotic mouse and human livers. The effects of intestinal AP were studied in mice with CCL4-induced liver fibrosis. DPLA strongly stimulated fibrogenic and inflammatory activities in primary rat hepatic stellate cells (rHSCs) and RAW264.7 macrophages with similar potency as full length LPS. However, MPLA did not affect any of the parameters. LPS-dephosphorylating activity was found in mouse and human livers and was strongly increased during fibrogenesis. Treatment of fibrotic mice with intravenous intestinal-AP significantly attenuated intrahepatic desmin+− and αSMA+ −HSC and CD68+− macrophage accumulation. In conclusion, the lack of biological activity of MPLA, contrasting with the profound activities of DPLA, shows the relevance of LPS-dephosphorylating activity. The upregulation of LPS-dephosphorylating activity in fibrotic livers and the protective effects of exogenous AP during fibrogenesis indicate an important physiological role of intestinal-derived AP during liver fibrosis. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Simultaneous Induction of Glycolysis and Oxidative Phosphorylation during Activation of Hepatic Stellate Cells Reveals Novel Mitochondrial Targets to Treat Liver Fibrosis
Cells 2020, 9(11), 2456; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9112456 - 11 Nov 2020
Abstract
Upon liver injury, hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) transdifferentiate to migratory, proliferative and extracellular matrix-producing myofibroblasts (e.g., activated HSCs; aHSCs) causing liver fibrosis. HSC activation is associated with increased glycolysis and glutaminolysis. Here, we compared the contribution of glycolysis, glutaminolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation [...] Read more.
Upon liver injury, hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) transdifferentiate to migratory, proliferative and extracellular matrix-producing myofibroblasts (e.g., activated HSCs; aHSCs) causing liver fibrosis. HSC activation is associated with increased glycolysis and glutaminolysis. Here, we compared the contribution of glycolysis, glutaminolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in rat and human HSC activation. Basal levels of glycolysis (extracellular acidification rate ~3-fold higher) and particularly mitochondrial respiration (oxygen consumption rate ~5-fold higher) were significantly increased in rat aHSCs, when compared to quiescent rat HSC. This was accompanied by extensive mitochondrial fusion in rat and human aHSCs, which occurred without increasing mitochondrial DNA content and electron transport chain (ETC) components. Inhibition of glycolysis (by 2-deoxy-D-glucose) and glutaminolysis (by CB-839) did not inhibit rat aHSC proliferation, but did reduce Acta2 (encoding α-SMA) expression slightly. In contrast, inhibiting mitochondrial OXPHOS (by rotenone) significantly suppressed rat aHSC proliferation, as well as Col1a1 and Acta2 expression. Other than that observed for rat aHSCs, human aHSC proliferation and expression of fibrosis markers were significantly suppressed by inhibiting either glycolysis, glutaminolysis or mitochondrial OXPHOS (by metformin). Activation of HSCs is marked by simultaneous induction of glycolysis and mitochondrial metabolism, extending the possibilities to suppress hepatic fibrogenesis by interfering with HSC metabolism. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Discovery and Targeting of the Signaling Controls of PNPLA3 to Effectively Reduce Transcription, Expression, and Function in Pre-Clinical NAFLD/NASH Settings
Cells 2020, 9(10), 2247; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9102247 - 07 Oct 2020
Abstract
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are emerging worldwide epidemics, projected to become the leading cause of liver transplants. The strongest genetic risk factor for NAFLD/NASH susceptibility and progression is a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing 3 [...] Read more.
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are emerging worldwide epidemics, projected to become the leading cause of liver transplants. The strongest genetic risk factor for NAFLD/NASH susceptibility and progression is a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing 3 gene (PNPLA3), rs738409, encoding the missense mutation I148M. This aminoacidic substitution interferes with the normal remodeling of lipid droplets in hepatocytes. It is also thought to play a key role in promoting liver fibrosis by inhibiting the release of retinol from hepatic stellate cells. Reducing PNPLA3 levels in individuals homozygous for 148M may be an effective treatment for the entire spectrum of NAFLD, based on gene dosage analysis in the human population, as well as the protective effect of another naturally occurring SNP (rs2294918) in PNPLA3 which, when co-inherited, reduces PNPLA3 mRNA levels to 50% and counteracts disease risk. By screening a clinical compound library targeting specific signaling pathways active in primary human hepatocytes, we identified momelotinib, a drug evaluated in clinical trials to treat myelofibrosis, as a potent down-regulator of PNPLA3 expression, across all genotypes. We found that momelotinib treatment yielded >80% reduction in PNPLA3 mRNA in human primary hepatocytes and stellate cells, as well as in vivo via acute and chronic treatment of WT mice. Using a human multilineage 3D spheroid model of NASH homozygous for the PNPLA3 mutant protein, we additionally show that it decreases PNPLA3 mRNA as well as intracellular lipid content. Furthermore, we show that the effects on PNPLA3 coincide with changes in chromatin accessibility within regulatory regions of the PNPLA3 locus, consistent with inhibition occurring at the level of transcription. In addition to its primary reported targets, the JAK kinases, momelotinib inhibits several non-JAK kinases, including ACVR1. Using a combination of targeted siRNA knockdowns and signaling pathway perturbations, we show that momelotinib reduces the expression of the PNPLA3 gene largely through the inhibition of BMP signaling rather than the JAK/STAT pathway. Overall, our work identified momelotinib as a potential NASH therapeutic and uncovered previously unrecognized connections between signaling pathways and PNPLA3. These pathways may be exploited by drug modalities to “tune down” the level of gene expression, and therefore offer a potential therapeutic benefit to a high at-risk subset of NAFLD/NASH patients. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
IL-13 as Target to Reduce Cholestasis and Dysbiosis in Abcb4 Knockout Mice
Cells 2020, 9(9), 1949; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9091949 - 24 Aug 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The Th2 cytokine IL-13 is involved in biliary epithelial injury and liver fibrosis in patients as well as in animal models. The aim of this study was to investigate IL-13 as a therapeutic target during short term and chronic intrahepatic cholestasis in an [...] Read more.
The Th2 cytokine IL-13 is involved in biliary epithelial injury and liver fibrosis in patients as well as in animal models. The aim of this study was to investigate IL-13 as a therapeutic target during short term and chronic intrahepatic cholestasis in an Abcb4-knockout mouse model (Abcb4−/−). Lack of IL-13 protected Abcb4−/− mice transiently from cholestasis. This decrease in serum bile acids was accompanied by an enhanced excretion of bile acids and a normalization of fecal bile acid composition. In Abcb4−/−/IL-13−/− double knockout mice, bacterial translocation to the liver was significantly reduced and the intestinal microbiome resembled the commensal composition in wild type animals. In addition, 52-week-old Abcb4−/−IL-13−/− mice showed significantly reduced hepatic fibrosis. Abcb4−/− mice devoid of IL-13 transiently improved cholestasis and converted the composition of the gut microbiota towards healthy conditions. This highlights IL-13 as a potential therapeutic target in biliary diseases. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Deletion of Perilipin 5 Protects against Hepatic Injury in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease via Missing Inflammasome Activation
Cells 2020, 9(6), 1346; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9061346 - 28 May 2020
Abstract
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a leading cause of chronic liver diseases with an increasing prevalence due to rising rates of obesity, metabolic syndrome and type II diabetes. Untreated NAFLD may progress to steatohepatitis (NASH) and ultimately liver cirrhosis. NAFLD is characterized [...] Read more.
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a leading cause of chronic liver diseases with an increasing prevalence due to rising rates of obesity, metabolic syndrome and type II diabetes. Untreated NAFLD may progress to steatohepatitis (NASH) and ultimately liver cirrhosis. NAFLD is characterized by lipid accumulation, and when sufficient excess lipids are obtained, irreversible liver injury may follow. Perilipin 5 (PLIN5), a known lipid droplet coating protein and triglyceride metabolism regulator, is highly expressed in oxidatively modified tissues but it is still unclear how it affects NAFLD/NASH progress. We here studied how PLIN5 affects NAFLD development induced by a 30-week high-fat diet (HFD) administration in wild type and PLIN5 knock out (Plin5−/−) mice. The disruption of PLIN5 induced differences in lipid metabolism during HFD feeding and was associated with reduced hepatic fat accumulation. Surprisingly, Plin5−/− mice showed mitigated activation of the NLR family pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, leading to minor hepatic damage. We conclude that PLIN5 is a pleiotropic regulator of hepatic homeostasis in NASH development. Targeting the PLIN5 expression appears critical for protecting the liver from inflammatory activation during chronic NAFLD. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
L-Selectin/CD62L Is a Key Driver of Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis in Mice and Men
Cells 2020, 9(5), 1106; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9051106 - 29 Apr 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
CD62L (L-Selectin) dependent lymphocyte infiltration is known to induce inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), while its function in the liver, especially in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), remains unclear. We here investigated the functional role of CD62L in NASH in humans as well as in two [...] Read more.
CD62L (L-Selectin) dependent lymphocyte infiltration is known to induce inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), while its function in the liver, especially in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), remains unclear. We here investigated the functional role of CD62L in NASH in humans as well as in two mouse models of steatohepatitis. Hepatic expression of a soluble form of CD62L (sCD62L) was measured in patients with steatosis and NASH. Furthermore, CD62L−/− mice were fed with a methionine and choline deficient (MCD) diet for 4 weeks or with a high fat diet (HFD) for 24 weeks. Patients with NASH displayed increased serum levels of sCD62L. Hepatic CD62L expression was higher in patients with steatosis and increased dramatically in NASH patients. Interestingly, compared to wild type (WT) mice, MCD and HFD-treated CD62L−/− mice were protected from diet-induced steatohepatitis. This was reflected by less fat accumulation in hepatocytes and a dampened manifestation of the metabolic syndrome with an improved insulin resistance and decreased cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Consistent with ameliorated disease, CD62L−/− animals exhibited an enhanced hepatic infiltration of Treg cells and a strong activation of an anti-oxidative stress response. Those changes finally resulted in less fibrosis in CD62L−/− mice. Additionally, this effect could be reproduced in a therapeutic setting by administrating an anti-CD62L blocking antibody. CD62L expression in humans and mice correlates with disease activity of steatohepatitis. CD62L knockout and anti-CD62L-treated mice are protected from diet-induced steatohepatitis suggesting that CD62L is a promising target for therapeutic interventions in NASH. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
EX-527 Prevents the Progression of High-Fat Diet-Induced Hepatic Steatosis and Fibrosis by Upregulating SIRT4 in Zucker Rats
Cells 2020, 9(5), 1101; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9051101 - 29 Apr 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
Sirtuin (SIRT) is known to prevent nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD); however, the role of SIRT4 in the progression of hepatic fibrosis remains unknown. We hypothesize that EX-527, a selective SIRT1 inhibitor, can inhibit the progression of high-fat diet (HFD)-induced hepatic fibrosis. We [...] Read more.
Sirtuin (SIRT) is known to prevent nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD); however, the role of SIRT4 in the progression of hepatic fibrosis remains unknown. We hypothesize that EX-527, a selective SIRT1 inhibitor, can inhibit the progression of high-fat diet (HFD)-induced hepatic fibrosis. We found that SIRT4 expression in the liver of NAFLD patients is significantly lower than that in normal subjects. In this study, EX-527 (5 µg/kg), administered to HFD rats twice a week for ten weeks, reduced the serum levels of triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and attenuated hepatic fibrosis evidenced by Masson’s trichrome and hepatic fat by oil red-O staining. EX-527 upregulated SIRT2, SIRT3, and SIRT4 expression in the liver of HFD fed rats but downregulated transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression. It decreased proinflammatory cytokine production and hydroxyproline levels in the serum and SMAD4 expression and restored apoptotic protein (Bcl-2, Bax, and cleaved caspase-3) expression. These data propose a critical role for the SIRT4/SMAD4 axis in hepatic fibrogenesis. SIRT4 upregulation has the potential to counter HFD-induced lipid accumulation, inflammation, and fibrogenesis. We demonstrate that EX-527 is a promising candidate in inhibiting the progression of HFD-induced liver fibrosis. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Epigenetics in Liver Fibrosis: Could HDACs be a Therapeutic Target?
Cells 2020, 9(10), 2321; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9102321 - 19 Oct 2020
Abstract
Chronic liver diseases (CLD) represent a worldwide health problem. While CLDs may have diverse etiologies, a common pathogenic denominator is the presence of liver fibrosis. Cirrhosis, the end-stage of CLD, is characterized by extensive fibrosis and is markedly associated with the development of [...] Read more.
Chronic liver diseases (CLD) represent a worldwide health problem. While CLDs may have diverse etiologies, a common pathogenic denominator is the presence of liver fibrosis. Cirrhosis, the end-stage of CLD, is characterized by extensive fibrosis and is markedly associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. The most important event in hepatic fibrogenesis is the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC) following liver injury. Activated HSCs acquire a myofibroblast-like phenotype becoming proliferative, fibrogenic, and contractile cells. While transient activation of HSCs is part of the physiological mechanisms of tissue repair, protracted activation of a wound healing reaction leads to organ fibrosis. The phenotypic changes of activated HSCs involve epigenetic mechanisms mediated by non-coding RNAs (ncRNA) as well as by changes in DNA methylation and histone modifications. During CLD these epigenetic mechanisms become deregulated, with alterations in the expression and activity of epigenetic modulators. Here we provide an overview of the epigenetic alterations involved in fibrogenic HSCs transdifferentiation with particular focus on histones acetylation changes. We also discuss recent studies supporting the promising therapeutic potential of histone deacetylase inhibitors in liver fibrosis. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Playing Jekyll and Hyde—The Dual Role of Lipids in Fatty Liver Disease
Cells 2020, 9(10), 2244; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9102244 - 06 Oct 2020
Abstract
Lipids play Jekyll and Hyde in the liver. On the one hand, the lipid-laden status of hepatic stellate cells is a hallmark of healthy liver. On the other hand, the opposite is true for lipid-laden hepatocytes—they obstruct liver function. Neglected lipid accumulation in [...] Read more.
Lipids play Jekyll and Hyde in the liver. On the one hand, the lipid-laden status of hepatic stellate cells is a hallmark of healthy liver. On the other hand, the opposite is true for lipid-laden hepatocytes—they obstruct liver function. Neglected lipid accumulation in hepatocytes can progress into hepatic fibrosis, a condition induced by the activation of stellate cells. In their resting state, these cells store substantial quantities of fat-soluble vitamin A (retinyl esters) in large lipid droplets. During activation, these lipid organelles are gradually degraded. Hence, treatment of fatty liver disease is treading a tightrope—unsophisticated targeting of hepatic lipid accumulation might trigger problematic side effects on stellate cells. Therefore, it is of great importance to gain more insight into the highly dynamic lipid metabolism of hepatocytes and stellate cells in both quiescent and activated states. In this review, part of the special issue entitled “Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms underlying the Pathogenesis of Hepatic Fibrosis 2020”, we discuss current and highly versatile aspects of neutral lipid metabolism in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Full article
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Open AccessReview
MicroRNA-221: A Fine Tuner and Potential Biomarker of Chronic Liver Injury
Cells 2020, 9(8), 1767; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9081767 - 23 Jul 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The last decade has witnessed significant advancements in our understanding of how small noncoding RNAs, such as microRNAs (miRNAs), regulate disease progression. One such miRNA, miR-221, has been shown to play a key role in the progression of liver fibrosis, a common feature [...] Read more.
The last decade has witnessed significant advancements in our understanding of how small noncoding RNAs, such as microRNAs (miRNAs), regulate disease progression. One such miRNA, miR-221, has been shown to play a key role in the progression of liver fibrosis, a common feature of most liver diseases. Many reports have demonstrated the upregulation of miR-221 in liver fibrosis caused by multiple etiologies such as viral infections and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Inhibition of miR-221 via different strategies has shown promising results in terms of the suppression of fibrogenic gene signatures in vitro, as well as in vivo, in independent mouse models of liver fibrosis. In addition, miR-221 has also been suggested as a noninvasive serum biomarker for liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. In this review, we discuss the biology of miR-221, its significance and use as a biomarker during progression of liver fibrosis, and finally, potential and robust approaches that can be utilized to suppress liver fibrosis via inhibition of miR-221. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Matrix Metalloproteinases as Potential Biomarkers and Therapeutic Targets in Liver Diseases
Cells 2020, 9(5), 1212; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9051212 - 13 May 2020
Cited by 5
Abstract
Chronic liver diseases, characterized by an excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) resulting in scar tissue formation, are a growing health problem causing increasing morbidity and mortality worldwide. Currently, therapeutic options for tissue fibrosis are severely limited, and organ transplantation is the only [...] Read more.
Chronic liver diseases, characterized by an excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) resulting in scar tissue formation, are a growing health problem causing increasing morbidity and mortality worldwide. Currently, therapeutic options for tissue fibrosis are severely limited, and organ transplantation is the only treatment for the end-stage liver diseases. During liver damage, injured hepatocytes release proinflammatory factors resulting in the recruitment and activation of immune cells that activate quiescent hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Upon activation, HSCs transdifferentiate into highly proliferative, migratory, contractile and ECM-producing myofibroblasts. The disrupted balance between ECM deposition and degradation leads to the formation of scar tissue referred to as fibrosis. This balance can be restored either by reducing ECM deposition (by inhibition of HSCs activation and proliferation) or enhancing ECM degradation (by increased expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)). MMPs play an important role in ECM remodeling and represent an interesting target for therapeutic drug discovery. In this review, we present the current knowledge about ECM remodeling and role of the different MMPs in liver diseases. MMP expression patterns in different stages of liver diseases have also been reviewed to determine their role as biomarkers. Finally, we highlight MMPs as promising therapeutic targets for the resolution of liver diseases. Full article
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Open AccessReview
The Emerging Role of MicroRNAs in NAFLD: Highlight of MicroRNA-29a in Modulating Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Beyond
Cells 2020, 9(4), 1041; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9041041 - 22 Apr 2020
Cited by 6
Abstract
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common cause of chronic liver disease and ranges from steatosis to steatohepatitis and to liver fibrosis. Lipotoxicity in hepatocytes, elevated oxidative stress and the activation of proinflammatory mediators of Kupffer cells, and fibrogenic pathways of activated [...] Read more.
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common cause of chronic liver disease and ranges from steatosis to steatohepatitis and to liver fibrosis. Lipotoxicity in hepatocytes, elevated oxidative stress and the activation of proinflammatory mediators of Kupffer cells, and fibrogenic pathways of activated hepatic stellate cells can contribute to the development of NAFLD. MicroRNAs (miRs) play a crucial role in the dysregulated metabolism and inflammatory signaling connected with NAFLD and its progression towards more severe stages. Of note, the protective effect of non-coding miR-29a on liver damage and its versatile action on epigenetic activity, mitochondrial homeostasis and immunomodulation may improve our perception of the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Herein, we review the biological functions of critical miRs in NAFLD, as well as highlight the emerging role of miR-29a in therapeutic application and the recent advances in molecular mechanisms underlying its liver protective effect. Full article
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Open AccessReview
The Endothelium as a Driver of Liver Fibrosis and Regeneration
Cells 2020, 9(4), 929; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9040929 - 10 Apr 2020
Cited by 7
Abstract
Liver fibrosis is a common feature of sustained liver injury and represents a major public health problem worldwide. Fibrosis is an active research field and discoveries in the last years have contributed to the development of new antifibrotic drugs, although none of them [...] Read more.
Liver fibrosis is a common feature of sustained liver injury and represents a major public health problem worldwide. Fibrosis is an active research field and discoveries in the last years have contributed to the development of new antifibrotic drugs, although none of them have been approved yet. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) are highly specialized endothelial cells localized at the interface between the blood and other liver cell types. They lack a basement membrane and display open channels (fenestrae), making them exceptionally permeable. LSEC are the first cells affected by any kind of liver injury orchestrating the liver response to damage. LSEC govern the regenerative process initiation, but aberrant LSEC activation in chronic liver injury induces fibrosis. LSEC are also main players in fibrosis resolution. They maintain liver homeostasis and keep hepatic stellate cell and Kupffer cell quiescence. After sustained hepatic injury, they lose their phenotype and protective properties, promoting angiogenesis and vasoconstriction and contributing to inflammation and fibrosis. Therefore, improving LSEC phenotype is a promising strategy to prevent liver injury progression and complications. This review focuses on changes occurring in LSEC after liver injury and their consequences on fibrosis progression, liver regeneration, and resolution. Finally, a synopsis of the available strategies for LSEC-specific targeting is provided. Full article
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