Special Issue "Role of Natural Bioactive Compounds in the Rise and Fall of Cancers"

A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Claudio Luparello

Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche, Chimiche, Farmaceutiche (STEBICEF), Edificio 16, Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Palermo 90128, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: breast cancer cells; hormones; extracellular matrix; enzyme inhibitors; cell proliferation; apoptosis; autophagy; gene expression

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recent years have seen the idea of a close association between nutrition and the modulation of cancer development/progression reinforced. In fact, an increasing amount of experimental and epidemiological evidence has been produced supporting the concept that many different bioactive components of food (e.g. polyphenols, mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids, methyl-group donors, etc.) may be implicated in either the promotion of or the protection against carcinogenesis. At the cellular level, such compounds can have an impact on different but sometimes intertwined processes, such as growth and differentiation, DNA repair, programmed cell death, and oxidative stress. In addition, compelling evidence is starting to build up of the existence of primary epigenetic targets of dietary compounds, such as oncogenic/oncosuppressor miRNAs or DNA-modifying enzymes, which in turn impair gene expression and function. Since there is a growing interest in the study of the biochemical and molecular role played by food components and its impact on cellular processes and/or gene expressions directed towards the fine-tuning of cancer phenotypes, in this Special Issue researchers are invited to contribute with either research or review articles that present the latest findings on the intracellular pathways and mechanisms affected by natural bioactive dietary molecules with a particular focus on epigenetic modulation.    

Prof. Claudio Luparello
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cancers is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • carcinogenesis
  • dietary compounds
  • epigenetics
  • gene expression
  • cell growth
  • cell differentiation
  • apoptosis
  • oxidative stress

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Ethanol-Mediated Stress Promotes Autophagic Survival and Aggressiveness of Colon Cancer Cells via Activation of Nrf2/HO-1 Pathway
Cancers 2019, 11(4), 505; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers11040505
Received: 11 February 2019 / Revised: 5 April 2019 / Accepted: 7 April 2019 / Published: 10 April 2019
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Abstract
Epidemiological studies suggest that chronic alcohol consumption is a lifestyle risk factor strongly associated with colorectal cancer development and progression. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of ethanol (EtOH) on survival and progression of three different colon cancer [...] Read more.
Epidemiological studies suggest that chronic alcohol consumption is a lifestyle risk factor strongly associated with colorectal cancer development and progression. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of ethanol (EtOH) on survival and progression of three different colon cancer cell lines (HCT116, HT29, and Caco-2). Our data showed that EtOH induces oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as demonstrated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ER stress markers Grp78, ATF6, PERK and, CHOP increase. Moreover, EtOH triggers an autophagic response which is accompanied by the upregulation of beclin, LC3-II, ATG7, and p62 proteins. The addition of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine significantly prevents autophagy, suggesting that autophagy is triggered by oxidative stress as a prosurvival response. EtOH treatment also upregulates the antioxidant enzymes SOD, catalase, and heme oxygenase (HO-1) and promotes the nuclear translocation of both Nrf2 and HO-1. Interestingly, EtOH also upregulates the levels of matrix metalloproteases (MMP2 and MMP9) and VEGF. Nrf2 silencing or preventing HO-1 nuclear translocation by the protease inhibitor E64d abrogates the EtOH-induced increase in the antioxidant enzyme levels as well as the migration markers. Taken together, our results suggest that EtOH mediates both the activation of Nrf2 and HO-1 to sustain colon cancer cell survival, thus leading to the acquisition of a more aggressive phenotype. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Role of Natural Bioactive Compounds in the Rise and Fall of Cancers)
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Review

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Regulation of Cell Signaling Pathways by Berberine in Different Cancers: Searching for Missing Pieces of an Incomplete Jig-Saw Puzzle for an Effective Cancer Therapy
Cancers 2019, 11(4), 478; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers11040478
Received: 7 March 2019 / Revised: 24 March 2019 / Accepted: 25 March 2019 / Published: 4 April 2019
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Abstract
There has been a renewed interest in the identification of natural products having premium pharmacological properties and minimum off-target effects. In accordance with this approach, natural product research has experienced an exponential growth in the past two decades and has yielded a stream [...] Read more.
There has been a renewed interest in the identification of natural products having premium pharmacological properties and minimum off-target effects. In accordance with this approach, natural product research has experienced an exponential growth in the past two decades and has yielded a stream of preclinical and clinical insights which have deeply improved our knowledge related to the multifaceted nature of cancer and strategies to therapeutically target deregulated signaling pathways in different cancers. In this review, we have set the spotlight on the scientifically proven ability of berberine to effectively target a myriad of deregulated pathways. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Role of Natural Bioactive Compounds in the Rise and Fall of Cancers)
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