Special Issue "Advances in Plasma Oncology toward Clinical Translation"

A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694). This special issue belongs to the section "Cancer Therapy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 January 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Annemie Bogaerts
Website
Guest Editor
Research group PLASMANT, Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp Campus Drie Eiken, Universiteitsplein 1, BE-2610 Wilrijk-Antwerp, Belgium
Interests: plasma; plasma chemistry; plasma oncology; plasma medicine; plasma catalysis; computer modeling; plasma cancer immunotherapy
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Katharina Stapelmann
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nuclear Engineering, NorthCarolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA
Interests: plasma diagnostics; plasma chemistry; plasma–liquid interaction, plasma–cell interaction; plasma for life science applications; plasma cancer treatment
Dr. Abraham Lin
Website
Guest Editor
Research group PLASMANT, Center for Oncological Research, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, BE-2610 Wilrijk-Antwerp, Belgium
Interests: plasma medicine; plasma device development; combination cancer therapy; immune modulation; tumor microenvironment
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the past decade, cold atmospheric plasmas (CAPs) have been under investigation for their potential for cancer treatment, thus opening the young, multidisciplinary field of plasma oncology. CAPs are tunable sources for the production and delivery of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS), which positions them as a unique tool to study intracellular redox pathways and for development as a novel redox therapy.

As new research tools and more sophisticated 3D in vitro cancer models are emerging, the role of the tumor microenvironment is attracting greater attention among plasma-cancer researchers. Strategies for combination therapy, e.g., immunotherapy, are also of great importance and are currently under development. There is a clear need for a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms, but at the same time, we should start thinking about the move toward clinical translation of this promising technology.

In this Special Issue, we will publish original research papers that provide fundamental understanding into the mechanisms of CAPs in cancer treatment, ranging from computer modeling to in vitro and in vivo experiments and clinical trials. New insights should preferably be considered and discussed in the context of clinical translation or application.

Dr. Annemie Bogaerts
Dr. Katharina Stapelmann
Dr. Abraham Lin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cancers is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Mechanistic studies of plasma effects on cancer cells;
  • Strategies for combination therapy;
  • Cancer-immunity cycle;
  • Tumor microenvironment;
  • Redox therapy with plasma;
  • 3D in vitro cancer models;
  • In vivo studies;
  • Safety analysis.

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Plasma Treatment Limits Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma Development In Vitro and In Vivo
Cancers 2020, 12(7), 1993; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12071993 - 21 Jul 2020
Abstract
Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most prevalent cancer worldwide, increasing the cost of healthcare services and with a high rate of morbidity. Its etiology is linked to chronic ultraviolet (UV) exposure that leads to malignant transformation of keratinocytes. Invasive growth and [...] Read more.
Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most prevalent cancer worldwide, increasing the cost of healthcare services and with a high rate of morbidity. Its etiology is linked to chronic ultraviolet (UV) exposure that leads to malignant transformation of keratinocytes. Invasive growth and metastasis are severe consequences of this process. Therapy-resistant and highly aggressive SCC is frequently fatal, exemplifying the need for novel treatment strategies. Cold physical plasma is a partially ionized gas, expelling therapeutic doses of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that were investigated for their anticancer capacity against SCC in vitro and SCC-like lesions in vivo. Using the kINPen argon plasma jet, a selective growth-reducing action of plasma treatment was identified in two SCC cell lines in 2D and 3D cultures. In vivo, plasma treatment limited the progression of UVB-induced SSC-like skin lesions and dermal degeneration without compromising lesional or non-lesional skin. In lesional tissue, this was associated with a decrease in cell proliferation and the antioxidant transcription factor Nrf2 following plasma treatment, while catalase expression was increased. Analysis of skin adjacent to the lesions and determination of global antioxidant parameters confirmed the local but not systemic action of the plasma anticancer therapy in vivo. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Plasma Oncology toward Clinical Translation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Combination Treatment with Cold Physical Plasma and Pulsed Electric Fields Augments ROS Production and Cytotoxicity in Lymphoma
Cancers 2020, 12(4), 845; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12040845 - 31 Mar 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
New approaches in oncotherapy rely on the combination of different treatments to enhance the efficacy of established monotherapies. Pulsed electric fields (PEFs) are an established method (electrochemotherapy) for enhancing cellular drug uptake while cold physical plasma is an emerging and promising anticancer technology. [...] Read more.
New approaches in oncotherapy rely on the combination of different treatments to enhance the efficacy of established monotherapies. Pulsed electric fields (PEFs) are an established method (electrochemotherapy) for enhancing cellular drug uptake while cold physical plasma is an emerging and promising anticancer technology. This study aimed to combine both technologies to elucidate their cytotoxic potential as well as the underlying mechanisms of the effects observed. An electric field generator (0.9–1.0 kV/cm and 100-μs pulse duration) and an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet were employed for the treatment of lymphoma cell lines as a model system. PEF but not plasma treatment induced cell membrane permeabilization. Additive cytotoxicity was observed for the metabolic activity and viability of the cells while the sequence of treatment in the combination played only a minor role. Intriguingly, a parallel combination was more effective compared to a 15-min pause between both treatment regimens. A combination effect was also found for lipid peroxidation; however, none could be observed in the cytosolic and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. The supplementation with either antioxidant, a pan-caspase-inhibitor or a ferroptosis inhibitor, all partially rescued lymphoma cells from terminal cell death, which contributes to the mechanistic understanding of this combination treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Plasma Oncology toward Clinical Translation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop