Special Issue "Plasma Medicine Technologies"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Biosciences and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Eun Ha Choi
E-Mail Website1 Website2 Website3
Guest Editor
Plasma Bioscience Research Center, Applied Plasma Medicine Center, Dept. Electrical & Biological Physics, Kwangwoon University, Korea
Interests: plasma medicine; plasma physics; charged particle physics; nonthermal plasma devices
Prof. Dr. Nagendra Kumar Kaushik
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Plasma Bioscience Research Center, Applied Plasma Medicine Center, Dept. Electrical & Biological Physics, Kwangwoon University, Korea
Interests: plasma medicine; nanomedicine; cancer biology; immune-modulation
Dr. Sander Bekeschus
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
ZIK plasmatis, Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology, Greifswald, Germany
Interests: redox medicine; immunology; cancer; cold physical plasma; reactive oxygen and nitrogen species; redox signaling
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Hiromasa Tanaka
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Center for Low-temperature Plasma Sciences, Nagoya University, Japan
Interests: plasma medicine
Dr. Abraham Lin
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Antwerp University, Belgium
Interests: plasma medicine; cancer biology; immune-modulation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plasma Medicine Technologies aims to cover all the latest outstanding developments of plasma bioscience and medicine. This Special Issue will describe recent research and developments in the field of plasma medicine. Plasma medicine is an interdisciplinary field that combines the principles of plasma physics, material science, bioscience, and medicine towards the development of therapeutic strategies. The study of plasma medicine has yielded the development of new treatment opportunities in medical and dental sciences.

The objective of this Special Issue is to present some research underlying new therapeutic methods useful in medicine, dentistry, sterilization, and, in the current scenario, challenges and perspectives in biomedical sciences. This issue will focus on basic studies on the characterization of the bioplasma sources applicable to the living cells, especially to the human body and fundamental researches of mutual intreactions between the bioplasma and organic–inorganic, liquids and bio- or nanomaterials. The knowledge that has arisen from studies in the plasma medicine area may translate into new innovations to treat patients in daily clinics.

Prof. Dr. Eun Ha Choi
Prof. Dr. Nagendra Kumar Kaushik
Dr. Sanders Bekechus
Prof. Dr. Hiromasha Tanaka
Dr. Abraham Lin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • plasma medicine
  • cold plasma
  • plasma physics

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Melanoma Growth Analysis in Blood Serum and Tissue Using Xenograft Model with Response to Cold Atmospheric Plasma Activated Medium
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(20), 4227; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9204227 - 10 Oct 2019
Abstract
Background: Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) proposed as a novel therapeutic tool for the various kinds of cancer treatment. Cold atmospheric Plasma-Activated Media (PAM) has exhibited its promising application in plasma medicine for the treatment of cancer. Methods: We investigated the role of PAM [...] Read more.
Background: Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) proposed as a novel therapeutic tool for the various kinds of cancer treatment. Cold atmospheric Plasma-Activated Media (PAM) has exhibited its promising application in plasma medicine for the treatment of cancer. Methods: We investigated the role of PAM on the human melanoma cancer G-361 cells xenograft in vivo by estimating the biochemical and gene expression of apoptotic genes. Results: Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) generated by PAM could significantly decrease the tumor volume (40%) and tumor weight (26%) when administered intradermally (i.d.) into the melanoma region continuously for three days. Biochemical studies in blood serum along with excised melanoma samples revealed an increase in protein carbonylation and MDA content as compared to the control, while LDH and L-DOPA in serum and melanoma tissues were decreased significantly in PAM treated group. PAM generated RONS increased apoptotic genes like Bcl-2, Bax, Parp, Casp8, and P53 in melanoma tissue. Immunohistochemistry data confirms that PAM treatment increased apoptosis at the tissue level. Conclusions: These results suggested that RONS present in PAM inhibit the induction of xenograft melanoma cancer cells through the induction of apoptosis and upregulating of various biochemical parameters within blood serum and melanoma. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasma Medicine Technologies)
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Open AccessArticle
Spore Viability and Cell Wall Integrity of Cordyceps pruinosa Treated with an Electric Shock-Free, Atmospheric-Pressure Air Plasma Jet
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(18), 3921; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9183921 - 18 Sep 2019
Abstract
Atmospheric-pressure Ar plasma jets are known to be detrimental to Cordyceps pruinosa spores. However, it is not clear what kinds of reactive species are more effective with regard to fungal cell death. Herein, we study which reactive species plays pivotal roles in [...] Read more.
Atmospheric-pressure A r plasma jets are known to be detrimental to Cordyceps pruinosa spores. However, it is not clear what kinds of reactive species are more effective with regard to fungal cell death. Herein, we study which reactive species plays pivotal roles in the death of fungal spores using an electric shock-free, atmospheric-pressure air plasma jet, simply called soft plasma jet. Plasma treatment significantly reduced the spore viability and damaged fungal DNA. As observed from the circular dichroism spectra, scanning electron microscope images, and flow cytometric measurements, cell wall integrity was decreased by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) from the plasma itself and the plasma-activated water. Consequently, degradation of the spore cell wall allows RONS from the plasma to reach the intracellular components. Such plasma-induced intracellular RONS can attack spore DNA and other intracellular components, as confirmed by electrophoresis analysis and phosphorylated histone measurement. In addition, weakening of the spore cell wall allowed for the loss of intracellular components, which can lead to cell death. Plasma radicals were investigated by measuring the optical emission spectrum of the soft plasma jet, and intracellular reactive oxygen species were confirmed by measuring the fluorescence of 2′, 7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein-diacetate ( H 2 D C F - D A )-stained spores. The soft plasma jet generated considerable amounts of H 2 O 2 and N O x but a very small number of O H radicals as compared to the atmospheric-pressure A r plasma jet; this indicates that plasma-induced long-lived reactive species ( H 2 O 2 and N O x ) play an important role in the weakening of spore cell walls and cell death. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasma Medicine Technologies)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Non-Thermal Plasma Accelerates Astrocyte Regrowth and Neurite Regeneration Following Physical Trauma In Vitro
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(18), 3747; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9183747 - 08 Sep 2019
Abstract
Non-thermal plasma (NTP), defined as a partially ionized gas, is an emerging technology with several biomedical applications, including tissue regeneration. In particular, NTP treatment has been shown to activate endogenous biological processes to promote cell regrowth, differentiation, and proliferation in multiple cell types. [...] Read more.
Non-thermal plasma (NTP), defined as a partially ionized gas, is an emerging technology with several biomedical applications, including tissue regeneration. In particular, NTP treatment has been shown to activate endogenous biological processes to promote cell regrowth, differentiation, and proliferation in multiple cell types. However, the effects of this therapy on nervous system regeneration have not yet been established. Accordingly, the current study explored the effects of a nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge plasma on neural regeneration. Following mechanical trauma in vitro, plasma was applied either directly to (1) astrocytes alone, (2) neurons alone, or (3) neurons or astrocytes in a non-contact co-culture. Remarkably, we identified NTP treatment intensities that accelerated both neurite regeneration and astrocyte regrowth. In astrocyte cultures alone, an exposure of 20–90 mJ accelerated astrocyte re-growth up to three days post-injury, while neurons required lower treatment intensities (≤20 mJ) to achieve sub-lethal outgrowth. Following injury to neurons in non-contact co-culture with astrocytes, 20 mJ exposure of plasma to only neurons or astrocytes resulted in increased neurite regeneration at three days post-treatment compared to the untreated, but no enhancement was observed when both cell types were treated. At day seven, although regeneration further increased, NTP did not elicit a significant increase from the control. However, plasma exposure at higher intensities was found to be injurious, underscoring the need to optimize exposure levels. These results suggest that growth-promoting physiological responses may be elicited via properly calibrated NTP treatment to neurons and/or astrocytes. This could be exploited to accelerate neurite re-growth and modulate neuron-astrocyte interactions, thereby hastening nervous system regeneration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasma Medicine Technologies)
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Open AccessArticle
Plasma-Derived Reactive Species Shape a Differentiation Profile in Human Monocytes
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(12), 2530; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9122530 - 21 Jun 2019
Abstract
Background: Monocyte-derived macrophages are key regulators and producers of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS). Pre-clinical and clinical studies suggest that cold physical plasma may be beneficial in the treatment of inflammatory conditions via the release of ROS/RNS. However, it is unknown how [...] Read more.
Background: Monocyte-derived macrophages are key regulators and producers of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS). Pre-clinical and clinical studies suggest that cold physical plasma may be beneficial in the treatment of inflammatory conditions via the release of ROS/RNS. However, it is unknown how plasma treatment affects monocytes and their differentiation profile. Methods: Naïve or phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-pulsed THP-1 monocytes were exposed to cold physical plasma. The cells were analyzed regarding their metabolic activity as well as flow cytometry (analysis of viability, oxidation, surface marker expression and cytokine secretion) and high content imaging (quantitative analysis of morphology. Results: The plasma treatment affected THP-1 metabolisms, viability, and morphology. Furthermore, a significant modulation CD55, CD69, CD271 surface-expression and increase of inflammatory IL1β, IL6, IL8, and MCP1 secretion was observed upon plasma treatment. Distinct phenotypical changes in THP-1 cells arguing for a differentiation profile were validated in primary monocytes from donor blood. As a functional outcome, plasma-treated monocytes decreased the viability of co-cultured melanoma cells to a greater extent than their non-treated counterparts. Conclusions: Our results suggest plasma-derived ROS/RNS shaped a differentiation profile in human monocytes as evidenced by their increased inflammatory profile (surface marker and cytokines) as well as functional outcome (tumor toxicity). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasma Medicine Technologies)
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