Special Issue "Cytologic Features of Tumor"

A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. José A. Jiménez Heffernan

Department of Pathology, University Hospital La Princesa. C/ Diego de León 62, 28006 Madrid, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: fine-needle aspiration cytology; immunocytochemistry; cell biology; epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition; mesothelial cells; carcinoma-associated fibroblasts; thyroid cytopathology; brain tumors
Guest Editor
Dr. Blanca Vicandi

Department of Pathology, University Hospital La Paz. Paseo de la Castellana 261, 28046, Madrid, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: fine-needle aspiration cytology; cervical cytology; cervical screening; immunocytochemistry; salivary gland neoplasms; thyroid cytopathology; reactive lymphadenopathies
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Pilar González-Peramato

Department of Pathology. Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. University Hospital La Paz. Paseo de la Castellana 261, 28046, Madrid, Spain Madrid, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: fine-needle aspiration cytology; molecular pathology; urinary cytology; renal neoplasms; testicular pathology; immunohistochemistry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) is a relatively young discipline within diagnostic pathology. It has pros and cons when compared to the gold standard pathologic diagnosis of histopathology. Its main advantage is that FNAC is a minimally invasive procedure that permits easy, safe, and rapid sampling of tumors as well as access to locations where a tissue biopsy is very difficult or impossible to perform. Its principal limitation is that sometimes the amount of material obtained is not enough for all the necessary studies. Its reduced invasiveness has permitted the appearance in the diagnostic scenario of endoscopic, ultrasound-guided FNAC of mediastinal, pancreatic, and other abdominal lesions. Furthermore, it has greatly contributed to the diagnosis and specific treatment of pulmonary and pancreatic neoplasms. Other aspects of diagnostic cytology such as effusion cytology, cervical cytology, and intraoperative cytology have also played an important role in offering a minimally invasive pathologic diagnosis.

The latest advances in molecular biology, more precisely next-generation sequencing, are certainly going to revolutionize the diagnosis of neoplasms. We all have great expectations in these methods as well as in liquid biopsy. To what extent is diagnostic pathology, as we know it today, going to be necessary? In this new diagnostic context, cytology establishes an ideal link between diagnostic morphology and molecular studies. Because of their low invasiveness, FNAC samples are ideal for obtaining material for molecular studies of solid tumors. This Special Issue will highlight recent advances in basic aspects of clinical cytopathology as well as the bridging role between diagnostic morphology and molecular studies offered by FNAC. Original research articles, short clinical series, as well as reviews on all aspects of diagnostic cytopathology are welcome.

Prof. Dr. José A. Jiménez Heffernan
Dr. Blanca Vicandi
Prof. Dr. Pilar González-Peramato
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cancers is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cytopathology
  • fine-needle aspiration cytology
  • diagnostic cytology
  • endoscopic ultrasound-guided FNA
  • intraoperative cytology
  • immunocytochemistry
  • molecular cytopathology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Safety and Usefulness of Cryobiopsy and Stamp Cytology for the Diagnosis of Peripheral Pulmonary Lesions
Cancers 2019, 11(3), 410; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers11030410
Received: 12 February 2019 / Revised: 11 March 2019 / Accepted: 18 March 2019 / Published: 22 March 2019
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Abstract
Reports on the use of cryobiopsy (CB) for lung cancer diagnosis are limited. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the safety and usefulness of CB using radial endobronchial ultrasonography, without a guide sheath, for the diagnosis of peripheral pulmonary lesions [...] Read more.
Reports on the use of cryobiopsy (CB) for lung cancer diagnosis are limited. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the safety and usefulness of CB using radial endobronchial ultrasonography, without a guide sheath, for the diagnosis of peripheral pulmonary lesions and determine the utility of stamp cytology, an on-site diagnostic technique for determining tumor inclusion in CB samples. We retrospectively analyzed data for 35 patients (36 lesions) with suspected peripheral lung cancer who underwent CB between August 2017 and February 2019 at our medical facility. The diagnostic yield, incidence of complications, and the utility of stamp cytology for diagnosis were investigated. The diagnostic yield of CB was 86.1% (31/36) with histological diagnosis, and 80.5% (29/36) with diagnosis using stamp cytology; the overall yield was 91.6% (33/36). Pneumothorax requiring thoracic drainage occurred in two patients, both of whom had lesions contacting the pleura. Grade 2 and grade 1 bleeding occurred in one and 25 patients, respectively. CB enables the collection of very large, nearly intact tissue samples, thus resulting in an improvement in the true diagnosis rate and facilitating the measurement of multiple biomarkers as well as rapid histological diagnosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cytologic Features of Tumor)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Emerging Molecular Technologies in Renal Cell Carcinoma: Liquid Biopsy
Cancers 2019, 11(2), 196; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers11020196
Received: 4 December 2018 / Revised: 26 January 2019 / Accepted: 4 February 2019 / Published: 7 February 2019
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Abstract
Liquid biopsy, based on the circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and cell-free nucleic acids has potential applications at multiple points throughout the natural course of cancer, from diagnosis to follow-up. The advantages of doing ctDNA assessment vs. tissue-based genomic profile are the minimal procedural [...] Read more.
Liquid biopsy, based on the circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and cell-free nucleic acids has potential applications at multiple points throughout the natural course of cancer, from diagnosis to follow-up. The advantages of doing ctDNA assessment vs. tissue-based genomic profile are the minimal procedural risk, the possibility to serial testing in order to monitor disease-relapse and response to therapy over time and to reduce hospitalization costs during the entire process. However, some critical issues related to ctDNA assays should be taken into consideration. The sensitivity of ctDNA assays depends on the assessment technique and genetic platforms used, on tumor-organ, stage, tumor heterogeneity, tumor clonality. The specificity is usually very high, whereas the concordance with tumor-based biopsy is generally low. In patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC), qualitative analyses of ctDNA have been performed with interesting results regarding selective pressure from therapy, therapeutic resistance, exceptional treatment response to everolimus and mutations associated with aggressive behavior. Quantitative analyses showed variations of ccfDNA levels at different tumor stage. Compared to CTC assay, ctDNA is more stable than cells and easier to isolate. Splice variants, information at single-cell level and functional assays along with proteomics, transcriptomics and metabolomics studies can be performed only in CTCs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cytologic Features of Tumor)
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