Special Issue "Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIPs) Biosensors"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensor Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Iva Chianella
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Aerospace, Transport and Manufacturing, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL, UK
Interests: piezoelectric biosensors/sensors; electrochemical biosensors/sensors; optical biosensors/sensors; molecularly imprinted polymers; molecularly imprinted nanoparticles; novel assays development; nanomaterials
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the past few decades, molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) have gained significant interest as stable and robust alternatives to biomolecules such as antibodies and enzymes. Particularly, MIP as films or nanoparticles have been showing great promise for the fabrication of highly sensitive, specific, and robust ‘bio’sensors/affinity sensors.

For this Special Issue, we seek manuscripts that describe the exploitation of MIP films or MIP nanoparticles for the development of electrochemical, optical, acoustic, or magnetic affinity sensors for a wide range of applications (e.g., medical, environmental, industrial, food, and security).

Both reviews and research articles will be published. Reviews should provide a critical evaluation of the current state-of-the-art of, for example, the use of MIP for the fabrication of a particular type of sensor (i.e., electrochemical, optical, acoustic, or magnetic). Critical reviews on the current exploitation of MIP sensors for a particular application (e.g., medical, environmental, industrial, food, and security) are also of interest. Original research papers that present either novel methods to prepare MIP films or MIP nanoparticles-based sensors or novel applications of MIP sensors are also welcome.

Dr. Iva Chianella
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Molecularly imprinted polymers
  • MIP
  • Molecularly imprinted polymers nanoparticles
  • Molecularly imprinted polymer films
  • MIP based electrochemical sensors
  • MIP based optical sensor
  • MIP based acoustic sensor
  • MIP based magnetic sensor

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Molecularly Imprinted Polyscopoletin for the Electrochemical Detection of the Chronic Disease Marker Lysozyme
Biosensors 2021, 11(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios11010003 - 23 Dec 2020
Viewed by 650
Abstract
Herein we report the electropolymerization of a scopoletin based molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) for the detection of lysozyme (Lyz), an enzymatic marker of several diseases in mammalian species. Two different approaches have been used for the imprinting of lysozyme based, respectively, on the [...] Read more.
Herein we report the electropolymerization of a scopoletin based molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) for the detection of lysozyme (Lyz), an enzymatic marker of several diseases in mammalian species. Two different approaches have been used for the imprinting of lysozyme based, respectively, on the use of a monomer-template mixture and on the covalent immobilization of the enzyme prior to polymer synthesis. In the latter case, a multi-step protocol has been exploited with preliminary functionalization of gold electrode with amino groups, via 4-aminothiophenol, followed by reaction with glutaraldehyde, to provide a suitable linker for lysozyme. Each step of surface electrode modification has been followed by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, which has been also employed to test the electrochemical responses of the developed MIP. The sensors show good selectivity to Lyz and detect the enzyme at concentrations up to 292 mg/L (20 μM), but with different performances, depending on the used imprinting approach. An imprinting factor equal to 7.1 and 2.5 and a limit of detection of 0.9 mg/L (62 nM) and 2.1 mg/L (141 nM) have been estimated for MIPs prepared with and without enzyme immobilization, respectively. Competitive rebinding experiment results show that this sensing material is selective for Lyz determination. Tests were performed using synthetic saliva to evaluate the potential application of the sensors in real matrices for clinical purposes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIPs) Biosensors)
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Open AccessArticle
Molecularly Imprinted Nanoparticles Based Sensor for Cocaine Detection
Biosensors 2020, 10(3), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios10030022 - 04 Mar 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2987
Abstract
The development of a sensor based on molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles (nanoMIPs) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) for the detection of trace levels of cocaine is described in this paper. NanoMIPs for cocaine detection, synthesized using a solid phase, were applied as the [...] Read more.
The development of a sensor based on molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles (nanoMIPs) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) for the detection of trace levels of cocaine is described in this paper. NanoMIPs for cocaine detection, synthesized using a solid phase, were applied as the sensing element. The nanoMIPs were first characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Dynamic Light Scattering and found to be ~148.35 ± 24.69 nm in size, using TEM. The nanoMIPs were then covalently attached to gold screen-printed electrodes and a cocaine direct binding assay was developed and optimized, using EIS as the sensing principle. EIS was recorded at a potential of 0.12 V over the frequency range from 0.1 Hz to 50 kHz, with a modulation voltage of 10 mV. The nanoMIPs sensor was able to detect cocaine in a linear range between 100 pg mL−1 and 50 ng mL−1 (R2 = 0.984; p-value = 0.00001) and with a limit of detection of 0.24 ng mL−1 (0.70 nM). The sensor showed no cross-reactivity toward morphine and a negligible response toward levamisole after optimizing the sensor surface blocking and assay conditions. The developed sensor has the potential to offer a highly sensitive, portable and cost-effective method for cocaine detection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIPs) Biosensors)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Molecular Imprinting on Nanozymes for Sensing Applications
Biosensors 2021, 11(5), 152; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios11050152 - 13 May 2021
Viewed by 212
Abstract
As part of the biomimetic enzyme field, nanomaterial-based artificial enzymes, or nanozymes, have been recognized as highly stable and low-cost alternatives to their natural counterparts. The discovery of enzyme-like activities in nanomaterials triggered a broad range of designs with various composition, size, and [...] Read more.
As part of the biomimetic enzyme field, nanomaterial-based artificial enzymes, or nanozymes, have been recognized as highly stable and low-cost alternatives to their natural counterparts. The discovery of enzyme-like activities in nanomaterials triggered a broad range of designs with various composition, size, and shape. An overview of the properties of nanozymes is given, including some examples of enzyme mimics for multiple biosensing approaches. The limitations of nanozymes regarding lack of selectivity and low catalytic efficiency may be surpassed by their easy surface modification, and it is possible to tune specific properties. From this perspective, molecularly imprinted polymers have been successfully combined with nanozymes as biomimetic receptors conferring selectivity and improving catalytic performance. Compelling works on constructing imprinted polymer layers on nanozymes to achieve enhanced catalytic efficiency and selective recognition, requisites for broad implementation in biosensing devices, are reviewed. Multimodal biomimetic enzyme-like biosensing platforms can offer additional advantages concerning responsiveness to different microenvironments and external stimuli. Ultimately, progress in biomimetic imprinted nanozymes may open new horizons in a wide range of biosensing applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIPs) Biosensors)
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Open AccessEditor’s ChoiceReview
Molecularly Imprinted Polymer-Quantum Dot Materials in Optical Sensors: An Overview of Their Synthesis and Applications
Biosensors 2021, 11(3), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios11030079 - 13 Mar 2021
Viewed by 518
Abstract
In the last decades analytical methods have focused on the determination of target analytes at very low concentration levels. This has been accomplished through the use of traditional analytical methods that usually require high reagent consumption, expensive equipment and long pretreatment steps. Thus, [...] Read more.
In the last decades analytical methods have focused on the determination of target analytes at very low concentration levels. This has been accomplished through the use of traditional analytical methods that usually require high reagent consumption, expensive equipment and long pretreatment steps. Thus, there is a demand for simple, rapid, highly selective and user-friendly detection procedures. Quantum dots (QDs) are semiconductor fluorescent nanomaterials with unique optoelectronic properties that have shown great potential for the development of fluorescence probes. Besides, the combination of QDs with molecularly imprinted polymer (MIPs), synthetic materials with selective recognition, have been proposed as useful materials in the development of optical sensors. The resulting MIP-QDs optical sensors integrate the advantages of both techniques: the high sensitivity of QDs-based fluorescence sensors and the high selectivity of MIPs. This review gives a brief overview of the strategies for the synthesis of MIPs-QDs based optical sensors, highlighting the modifications in the synthesis procedure that improve the sensor performance. Finally, a revision of recent applications in sensing and bioimaging is presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIPs) Biosensors)
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