Special Issue "Plant-Derived Natural Compounds in the Management of Cancer: Significance and Challenges"

A special issue of Biomolecules (ISSN 2218-273X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Dietrich Büsselberg
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Weill Cornell Medicine-Qatar, Education City, Qatar
Interests: (neuro-)physiology; pharmacology and cell signaling; anti-cancer drugs; natural compounds
Dr. Samson Mathews Samuel
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Weill Cornell Medicine-Qatar, Education City, Qatar
Interests: Oxidant Stress and Myocardial Angiogenesis; Oxidant Stress and ER stress in Diabetes/Hyperglycemia mediated Endothelial Dysfunction's
Dr. Peter Kubatka
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Comenius University in Bratislava, Jesseniuss Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biology, Martin, Slovakia
Interests: experimental mammary carcinogenesis, chemoprevention, therapy, animal models, plant-derived funtional foods, cancer cell signaling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cancer is a major disease worldwide, contributing significantly to the social and economic burden. Therefore, there is an unmet need to develop cancer prevention strategies for those at risk and improve treatment strategies for the benefit of those that are already affected. Although several mechanisms have been proposed for the development and progression of various cancers, there remain areas that need to be explored and an urgency to tackle these processes (using anti-cancer drugs) to reduce the development and progression of cancers and improve the efficacy of cancer treatments.

Cancers often develop over years or even decades, triggered by different processes involving DNA damage, chronic inflammation, comprehensive interaction between relevant molecular pathways, and cellular cross-talk with the neighboring tissues. Only a minor part of cancers are caused by inborn pre-disposition. The absolute majority carry a sporadic character based on modifiable risk factors which play a central role in cancer prevention. Numerous studies have documented that dietary natural plant products (both whole products as well as their isolated active compounds) are able to affect the initiation, promotion, and progression of cancers. The long-term administration of multi-target phytochemicals with a plethora of biological activities can thus be the most rational and effective strategy used in medical practice in this regard.

This Special Issue focusses on the effects of plant-derived dietary factors on carcinogenesis and effective cancer treatment. It includes in-vitro- and in-vivo-based cancer models evaluating the mechanisms of action of phytochemicals on cancer; clinical investigations on the role of the plant compounds on cancer risk, treatment, and survival; novel methodological approaches to enhance the bioavailability of phytochemicals; and novel strategies for the extraction, purification, and characterization natural compounds with anticancer activity. For this Special Issue, we invite original research articles and reviews related to the role of plant-derived natural compounds on cancers.

Dr. Dietrich Büsselberg
Dr. Samson Mathews Samuel
Dr. Peter Kubatka
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomolecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • angiogenesis
  • antioxidants
  • apoptosis
  • cancer cells
  • cancer chemoprevention
  • cancer stem cells
  • cancer treatment
  • cell cycle regulation
  • epigenetic modulators
  • geno-protective effects
  • natural bioactive compounds
  • nutraceuticals
  • nutrition
  • oxidative stress
  • phytochemicals
  • plant functional foods
  • polyphenols
  • terpenoids

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Antioxidant Activity of Selected Stilbenoid Derivatives in a Cellular Model System
Biomolecules 2019, 9(9), 468; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom9090468 - 09 Sep 2019
Abstract
The stilbenoids, a group of naturally occurring phenolic compounds, are found in a variety of plants, including some berries that are used as food or for medicinal purposes. They are known to be beneficial for human health as anti-inflammatory, chemopreventive, and antioxidative agents. [...] Read more.
The stilbenoids, a group of naturally occurring phenolic compounds, are found in a variety of plants, including some berries that are used as food or for medicinal purposes. They are known to be beneficial for human health as anti-inflammatory, chemopreventive, and antioxidative agents. We have investigated a group of 19 stilbenoid substances in vitro using a cellular model of THP-1 macrophage-like cells and pyocyanin-induced oxidative stress to evaluate their antioxidant or pro-oxidant properties. Then we have determined any effects that they might have on the expression of the enzymes catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and heme oxygenase-1, and their effects on the activation of Nrf2. The experimental results showed that these stilbenoids could affect the formation of reactive oxygen species in a cellular model, producing either an antioxidative or pro-oxidative effect, depending on the structure pinostilbene (2) worked as a pro-oxidant and also decreased expression of catalase in the cell culture. Piceatannol (4) had shown reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging activity, whereas isorhapontigenin (18) had a mild direct antioxidant effect and activated Nrf2-antioxidant response element (ARE) system and elevated expression of Nrf2 and catalase. Their effects shown on cells in vitro warrant their further study in vivo. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
DNA Methylation Status in Cancer Disease: Modulations by Plant-Derived Natural Compounds and Dietary Interventions
Biomolecules 2019, 9(7), 289; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom9070289 - 18 Jul 2019
Abstract
The modulation of the activity of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) represents a crucial epigenetic mechanism affecting gene expressions or DNA repair mechanisms in the cells. Aberrant modifications in the function of DNMTs are a fundamental event and part of the pathogenesis of human cancer. [...] Read more.
The modulation of the activity of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) represents a crucial epigenetic mechanism affecting gene expressions or DNA repair mechanisms in the cells. Aberrant modifications in the function of DNMTs are a fundamental event and part of the pathogenesis of human cancer. Phytochemicals, which are biosynthesized in plants in the form of secondary metabolites, represent an important source of biomolecules with pleiotropic effects and thus provide a wide range of possible clinical applications. It is well documented that phytochemicals demonstrate significant anticancer properties, and in this regard, rapid development within preclinical research is encouraging. Phytochemicals affect several epigenetic molecular mechanisms, including DNA methylation patterns such as the hypermethylation of tumor-suppressor genes and the global hypomethylation of oncogenes, that are specific cellular signs of cancer development and progression. This review will focus on the latest achievements in using plant-derived compounds and plant-based diets targeting epigenetic regulators and modulators of gene transcription in preclinical and clinical research in order to generate novel anticancer drugs as sensitizers for conventional therapy or compounds suitable for the chemoprevention clinical setting in at-risk individuals. In conclusion, indisputable anticancer activities of dietary phytochemicals linked with proper regulation of DNA methylation status have been described. However, precisely designed and well-controlled clinical studies are needed to confirm their beneficial epigenetic effects after long-term consumption in humans. Full article
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