Advanced Nanotechnology for Health and Diseases

A special issue of Biomolecules (ISSN 2218-273X). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Medicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 3844

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
CURAM, Center for Research in Medical Devices, University of Galway, H91 TK33 Galway, Ireland
Interests: magnetic nanoparticles; cancer medicine; drug targeting; nanotechnology; polymers; targeted therapies
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Advanced biomedical nanotechnology for health and diseases has emerged as a cutting-edge research field with tremendous potential to revolutionize healthcare. Nanotechnology-based approaches have the potential to provide targeted and personalized solutions for a wide range of health conditions, including cancer, cardiovascular diseases, neurological disorders, infectious diseases, and more.

In this Special Issue, we invite researchers to contribute manuscripts highlighting the latest developments in using nanotechnology to diagnose and treat various health conditions, including cancer, Alzheimer's disease, cardiovascular disease, and infectious diseases, among others. We welcome submissions in the form of reviews, research articles, communications, and hypothesis that focus on the design, synthesis, and application of innovative nanotechnologies for biomedical use. Our goal is to provide a platform for researchers worldwide to share their insights and findings, accelerate progress, and promote translating these technologies into therapeutic applications.

Dr. Raghvendra A. Bohara
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomolecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • healthcare
  • nanobiotechnology
  • chronic diseases
  • drug delivery
  • biomaterials
  • cancer
  • inflammation

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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15 pages, 2296 KiB  
Article
On Interactions of Sulfamerazine with Cyclodextrins from Coupled Diffusometry and Toxicity Tests
by Sara P. C. Sofio, André Caeiro, Ana C. F. Ribeiro, Ana M. T. D. P. V. Cabral, Artur J. M. Valente, Jorge Canhoto and Miguel A. Esteso
Biomolecules 2024, 14(4), 462; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom14040462 - 10 Apr 2024
Viewed by 345
Abstract
This scientific study employs the Taylor dispersion technique for diffusion measurements to investigate the interaction between sulfamerazine (NaSMR) and macromolecular cyclodextrins (β-CD and HP-β-CD). The results reveal that the presence of β-CD influences the diffusion of the solution [...] Read more.
This scientific study employs the Taylor dispersion technique for diffusion measurements to investigate the interaction between sulfamerazine (NaSMR) and macromolecular cyclodextrins (β-CD and HP-β-CD). The results reveal that the presence of β-CD influences the diffusion of the solution component, NaSMR, indicating a counterflow of this drug due to solute interaction. However, diffusion data indicate no inclusion of NaSMR within the sterically hindered HP-β-CD cavity. Additionally, toxicity tests were conducted, including pollen germination (Actinidia deliciosa) and growth curve assays in BY-2 cells. The pollen germination tests demonstrate a reduction in sulfamerazine toxicity, suggesting potential applications for this antimicrobial agent with diminished adverse effects. This comprehensive investigation contributes to a deeper understanding of sulfamerazine–cyclodextrin interactions and their implications for pharmaceutical and biological systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Nanotechnology for Health and Diseases)
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Review

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22 pages, 2066 KiB  
Review
Harnessing Nanotechnology: Emerging Strategies for Multiple Myeloma Therapy
by Min Yang, Yu Chen, Li Zhu, Liangshun You, Hongyan Tong, Haitao Meng, Jianpeng Sheng and Jie Jin
Biomolecules 2024, 14(1), 83; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom14010083 - 09 Jan 2024
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1576
Abstract
Advances in nanotechnology have provided novel avenues for the diagnosis and treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), a hematological malignancy characterized by the clonal proliferation of plasma cells in the bone marrow. This review elucidates the potential of nanotechnology to revolutionize myeloma therapy, focusing [...] Read more.
Advances in nanotechnology have provided novel avenues for the diagnosis and treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), a hematological malignancy characterized by the clonal proliferation of plasma cells in the bone marrow. This review elucidates the potential of nanotechnology to revolutionize myeloma therapy, focusing on nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems, nanoscale imaging techniques, and nano-immunotherapy. Nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems offer enhanced drug targeting, reduced systemic toxicity, and improved therapeutic efficacy. We discuss the latest developments in nanocarriers, such as liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, and inorganic nanoparticles, used for the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents, siRNA, and miRNA in MM treatment. We delve into nanoscale imaging techniques which provide spatial multi-omic data, offering a holistic view of the tumor microenvironment. This spatial resolution can help decipher the complex interplay between cancer cells and their surrounding environment, facilitating the development of highly targeted therapies. Lastly, we explore the burgeoning field of nano-immunotherapy, which employs nanoparticles to modulate the immune system for myeloma treatment. Specifically, we consider how nanoparticles can be used to deliver tumor antigens to antigen-presenting cells, thus enhancing the body’s immune response against myeloma cells. In conclusion, nanotechnology holds great promise for improving the prognosis and quality of life of MM patients. However, several challenges remain, including the need for further preclinical and clinical trials to assess the safety and efficacy of these emerging strategies. Future research should also focus on developing personalized nanomedicine approaches, which could tailor treatments to individual patients based on their genetic and molecular profiles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Nanotechnology for Health and Diseases)
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21 pages, 2034 KiB  
Review
Nanoparticle-Mediated Delivery of Flavonoids: Impact on Proinflammatory Cytokine Production: A Systematic Review
by Jazmín Cristina Stevens Barrón, Christian Chapa González, Emilio Álvarez Parrilla and Laura Alejandra De la Rosa
Biomolecules 2023, 13(7), 1158; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom13071158 - 21 Jul 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1261
Abstract
Flavonoids are a diverse group of plant-derived compounds that have been shown to have various health benefits, including anti-inflammatory effects. However, their use in the treatment of inflammatory diseases has been limited due to their low bioavailability. The nanoparticle-mediated delivery of flavonoids has [...] Read more.
Flavonoids are a diverse group of plant-derived compounds that have been shown to have various health benefits, including anti-inflammatory effects. However, their use in the treatment of inflammatory diseases has been limited due to their low bioavailability. The nanoparticle-mediated delivery of flavonoids has been proposed as a potential solution to this issue, as it allows the sustained release of the flavonoids over time. There are several different nanoparticle systems that have been developed for flavonoid delivery, including polymeric nanoparticles, liposomes, and inorganic nanoparticles. This systematic review aims to evaluate the impact of nanoparticle-mediated delivery of flavonoids on pro-inflammatory cytokine production in various diseases. We analyzed the performance of flavonoid-encapsulated nanoparticles in regulating cytokine production in different in vitro and in vivo studies. To this end, we followed the guidelines of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) to conduct a comprehensive search of the literature and to assess the quality of the included studies. The results showed that flavonoid-encapsulated nanoparticles significantly downregulated pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-18. In some cases, this effect was significantly greater than that observed with non-encapsulated flavonoids These findings suggest that nanoparticle-mediated delivery of flavonoids may have potential as a therapeutic approach for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Nanotechnology for Health and Diseases)
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