Special Issue "Vascularized Tissue Models in Regenerative Engineering"

A special issue of Bioengineering (ISSN 2306-5354).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2016).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Jacqueline J. Alblas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Orthopaedics, Room G05.228, University Medical Center Utrecht, PO Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht, The Netherlands
Interests: bioprinting; vascularization; bone regeneration; stem cells; gene therapy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Tissue engineering comprises a wide variety of strategies aimed at developing tissue constructs for regeneration or repair of body parts. For almost all tissues, in order to quickly enable nutrient and oxygen supply once the constructs are implanted, it is necessary to develop and include pre-vascularization strategies. Bioprinting plays an increasingly important role in the design of such engineered constructs, as this technology allows the inclusion of interconnected porosity and channels of multiple length scales as well as predefined placement of different cell types, molecular factors and controlled delivery systems. In the development of tissue models, which might replace current animal models and serve for screening purposes, either pharmaceutical or to gain patient specific information, the vascular (micro)environment is also highly relevant.

The current Special Issue seeks contributions addressing (pre)vascularization strategies in biofabrication, either as part of regenerative engineering strategies or as components in tissue model development.

Dr. Jacqueline Alblas
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Bioengineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • vascularization
  • biofabrication
  • three-dimensional tissue models
  • organ-on–a-chip and human-on-a-chip
  • stem cells, iPS cells
  • controlled drug delivery

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Longitudinal Stretching for Maturation of Vascular Tissues Using Magnetic Forces
Bioengineering 2016, 3(4), 29; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering3040029 - 16 Nov 2016
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2752
Abstract
Cellular spheroids were studied to determine their use as “bioinks” in the biofabrication of tissue engineered constructs. Specifically, magnetic forces were used to mediate the cyclic longitudinal stretching of tissues composed of Janus magnetic cellular spheroids (JMCSs), as part of a post-processing method [...] Read more.
Cellular spheroids were studied to determine their use as “bioinks” in the biofabrication of tissue engineered constructs. Specifically, magnetic forces were used to mediate the cyclic longitudinal stretching of tissues composed of Janus magnetic cellular spheroids (JMCSs), as part of a post-processing method for enhancing the deposition and mechanical properties of an extracellular matrix (ECM). The purpose was to accelerate the conventional tissue maturation process via novel post-processing techniques that accelerate the functional, structural, and mechanical mimicking of native tissues. The results of a forty-day study of JMCSs indicated an expression of collagen I, collagen IV, elastin, and fibronectin, which are important vascular ECM proteins. Most notably, the subsequent exposure of fused tissue sheets composed of JMCSs to magnetic forces did not hinder the production of these key proteins. Quantitative results demonstrate that cyclic longitudinal stretching of the tissue sheets mediated by these magnetic forces increased the Young’s modulus and induced collagen fiber alignment over a seven day period, when compared to statically conditioned controls. Specifically, the elastin and collagen content of these dynamically-conditioned sheets were 35- and three-fold greater, respectively, at seven days compared to the statically-conditioned controls at three days. These findings indicate the potential of using magnetic forces in tissue maturation, specifically through the cyclic longitudinal stretching of tissues. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vascularized Tissue Models in Regenerative Engineering)
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