Special Issue "Emerging Trends in Beverage Processing"

A special issue of Beverages (ISSN 2306-5710).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (26 February 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Antonio Morata
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Science and Technology, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM), Madrid, Spain
Interests: Food technology; enology; wine microbiology; yeast metabolomics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is focused on new technologies to process beverages to improve the extraction from raw materials, the nutritional and sensory quality, and increase the shelf-life. Additionally, emerging technologies to analyse or control the quality of food products are of interest. Among them can be included new fermentation biotechnologies, nanotechnology, emerging physical technologies to cold-process vegetables, or milk to produce beverages. The use of cold processing technologies facilitates the extraction and improves the sensory quality of food products. Some of them are now available at an industrial scale, such as HHP, UHPH, PEF, US, MW, CP, etc.

Prof. Antonio Morata
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Beverages is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanotechnology
  • high hydrostatic pressure (HHP)
  • ultrahigh pressure homogenization (UHPH)
  • pulsed electric field (PEF)
  • ultrasound (US)
  • microwave (MW)
  • cold plasma (CP)

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
Emerging Trends in Beverage Processing
Beverages 2021, 7(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages7010008 - 28 Jan 2021
Viewed by 765
Abstract
Beverage processing is open to new technologies; among them, nonthermal physical technologies such as discontinuous hydrostatic pressure (HHP), ultrahigh-pressure homogenization (UHPH), pulsed electric field (PEF), ultrasound (US), atmospheric pressure cold plasma (APCP), or pulsed light (PL) are growing increasingly in the food industry [...] Read more.
Beverage processing is open to new technologies; among them, nonthermal physical technologies such as discontinuous hydrostatic pressure (HHP), ultrahigh-pressure homogenization (UHPH), pulsed electric field (PEF), ultrasound (US), atmospheric pressure cold plasma (APCP), or pulsed light (PL) are growing increasingly in the food industry [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Trends in Beverage Processing)

Research

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Article
Statistical Modelization of the Descriptor “Minerality” Based on the Sensory Properties and Chemical Composition of Wine
Beverages 2019, 5(4), 66; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages5040066 - 22 Nov 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1151
Abstract
When speaking of “minerality” in wines, it is common to find descriptive terms in the vocabulary of wine tasters such as flint, match smoke, kerosene, rubber eraser, slate, granite, limestone, earthy, tar, charcoal, graphite, rock dust, wet stones, salty, metallic, steel, ferrous, etc. [...] Read more.
When speaking of “minerality” in wines, it is common to find descriptive terms in the vocabulary of wine tasters such as flint, match smoke, kerosene, rubber eraser, slate, granite, limestone, earthy, tar, charcoal, graphite, rock dust, wet stones, salty, metallic, steel, ferrous, etc. These are just a few of the descriptors that are commonly found in the tasting notes of wines that show this sensory profile. However, not all wines show this mineral trace at the aromatic and gustatory level. This study has used the statistical tool partial least squares regression (PLS) to mathematically model the attribute of “minerality” of wine, thereby obtaining formulas where the chemical composition and sensory attributes act jointly as the predictor variables, both for white wines and red wines, so as to help understand the term and to devise a winemaking approach able to endow wines with this attribute if desired. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Trends in Beverage Processing)
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Article
Effect of the Atmospheric Pressure Cold Plasma Treatment on Tempranillo Red Wine Quality in Batch and Flow Systems
Beverages 2019, 5(3), 50; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages5030050 - 05 Aug 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1683
Abstract
The demand for chemical-free beverages is posing a challenge to the wine industry to provide safe and healthy products with low concentrations of chemical preservatives. The development of new technologies, such as Atmospheric Pressure Cold Plasma (APCP), offers the wine industry the opportunity [...] Read more.
The demand for chemical-free beverages is posing a challenge to the wine industry to provide safe and healthy products with low concentrations of chemical preservatives. The development of new technologies, such as Atmospheric Pressure Cold Plasma (APCP), offers the wine industry the opportunity to contribute to this continuous improvement. The purpose of this research is to evaluate the effect of Argon APCP treatment, applied in both batch and flow systems, on Tempranillo red wine quality. Batch treatments of 100 mL were applied with two powers (60 and 90 W) at four periods (1, 3, 5, and 10 min). For flowing devices, 750 mL of wine with a flow of 1.2 and 2.4 L/min were treated at 60 and 90 W for 25 min and was sampled every 5 min. Treatments in batch resulted in wines with greater color intensity, lower tonality, and higher content in total phenolic compounds and anthocyanins, so that they were favorable for wine quality. Among the batch treatments, the one with the lowest power was the most favorable. Flow continuous treatments, despite being more appropriate to implement in wineries, neither led to significant improvements in the chromatic and phenolic wine properties nor caused wine spoilage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Trends in Beverage Processing)
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Review

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Review
Pulsed Light: Challenges of a Non-Thermal Sanitation Technology in the Winemaking Industry
Beverages 2020, 6(3), 45; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages6030045 - 14 Jul 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1294
Abstract
Pulsed light is an emerging non-thermal technology viable for foodstuff sanitation. The sanitation is produced through the use of high energy pulses during ultra-short periods of time (ns to µs). The pulsed light induces irreversible damages at the DNA level with the formation [...] Read more.
Pulsed light is an emerging non-thermal technology viable for foodstuff sanitation. The sanitation is produced through the use of high energy pulses during ultra-short periods of time (ns to µs). The pulsed light induces irreversible damages at the DNA level with the formation of pyrimidine dimers, but also produces photo-thermal and photo-physical effects on the microbial membranes that lead to a reduction in the microbial populations. The reduction caused in the microbial populations can reach several fold, up to 4 log CFU/mL decrement. A slight increase of 3 to 4 °C in temperature is observed in treated food; nonetheless, this increase does not modify either the nutritional properties of the product or its sensory profile. The advantages of using pulsed light could be used to a greater extent in the winemaking industry. Experimental trials have shown a positive effect of reducing native yeast and bacteria in grapes to populations below 1–2 log CFU/mL. In this way, pulsed light, a non-thermal technology currently available for the sanitation of foodstuffs, is an alternative for the reduction in native microbiota and the later control of the fermentative process in winemaking. This certainly would allow the use of fermentation biotechnologies such as the use of non-Saccharomyces yeasts in mixed and sequential fermentations to preserve freshness in wines through the production of aroma volatile compounds and organic acids, and the production of wines with less utilization of SO2 in accordance with the consumers’ demand in the market. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Trends in Beverage Processing)
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Review
Lactobacillus plantarum, a New Biological Tool to Control Malolactic Fermentation: A Review and an Outlook
Beverages 2020, 6(2), 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages6020023 - 07 Apr 2020
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 1708
Abstract
Malolactic fermentation (MLF) in wine is an important step in the vinification of most red and some white wines, as stands for the biological conversion of l-malic acid into l-lactic acid and carbon dioxide, resulting in a decrease in wine acidity. [...] Read more.
Malolactic fermentation (MLF) in wine is an important step in the vinification of most red and some white wines, as stands for the biological conversion of l-malic acid into l-lactic acid and carbon dioxide, resulting in a decrease in wine acidity. MLF not only results in a biological deacidification, it can exert a significant impact on the organoleptic qualities of wine. This paper reviews the biodiversity of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in wine, their origin, and the limiting conditions encountered in wine, which allow only the most adapted species and strains to survive and induce malolactic fermentation. Of all the species of wine LAB, Oenococcus oeni is probably the best adapted to overcome the harsh environmental wine conditions and therefore represents the majority of commercial MLF starter cultures. Wine pH is most challenging, but, as a result of global warming, Lactobacillus sp. is more often reported to predominate and be responsible for spontaneous malolactic fermentation. Some Lactobacillus plantarum strains can tolerate the high alcohol and SO2 levels normally encountered in wine. This paper shows the potential within this species for the application as a starter culture for induction of MLF in juice or wine. Due to its complex metabolism, a range of compositional changes can be induced, which may positively affect the quality of the final product. An example of a recent isolate has shown most interesting results, not only for its capacity to induce MLF after direct inoculation, but also for its positive contribution to the wine quality. Degrading hexose sugars by the homo-fermentative pathway, which poses no risk of acetic acid production from the sugars, is an interesting alternative to control MLF in high pH wines. Within this species, we can expect more strains with interesting enological properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Trends in Beverage Processing)
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Review
Potential Applications of High Pressure Homogenization in Winemaking: A Review
Beverages 2019, 5(3), 56; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages5030056 - 03 Sep 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1876
Abstract
High pressure homogenization (HPH) is an emerging technology with several possible applications in the food sector, such as nanoemulsion preparation, microbial and enzymatic inactivation, cell disruption for the extraction of intracellular components, as well as modification of food biopolymer structures to steer their [...] Read more.
High pressure homogenization (HPH) is an emerging technology with several possible applications in the food sector, such as nanoemulsion preparation, microbial and enzymatic inactivation, cell disruption for the extraction of intracellular components, as well as modification of food biopolymer structures to steer their functionalities. All these effects are attributable to the intense mechanical stresses, such as cavitation and shear forces, suffered by the product during the passage through the homogenization valve. The exploitation of the disruptive forces delivered during HPH was also recently proposed for winemaking applications. In this review, after a general description of HPH and its main applications in food processing, the survey is extended to the use of this technology for the production of wine and fermented beverages, particularly focusing on the effects of HPH on the inactivation of wine microorganisms and the induction of yeast autolysis. Further enological applications of HPH technology, such as its use for the production of inactive dry yeast preparations, are also discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Trends in Beverage Processing)
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Review
Hyperbaric Storage at Room Temperature for Fruit Juice Preservation
Beverages 2019, 5(3), 49; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages5030049 - 02 Aug 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2070
Abstract
Hyperbaric storage is an innovative preservation method that consists of storing food under pressure, either at room or at low temperature, for time periods of days, weeks, or months. Recent scientific literature shows that hyperbaric storage at room temperature (HS-RT) could be an [...] Read more.
Hyperbaric storage is an innovative preservation method that consists of storing food under pressure, either at room or at low temperature, for time periods of days, weeks, or months. Recent scientific literature shows that hyperbaric storage at room temperature (HS-RT) could be an efficient method for fruit juice preservation. Depending on the level applied, pressure can inhibit and even inactivate the endogenous microflora of the fresh juice, while properly preserving other organoleptic and quality indicators. Even though the method has not yet been implemented in the food industry, its industrial viability has been evaluated from different points of view (product quality, consumer acceptation, vessel design, economic, or environmental, among others). The results reveal that HS-RT is effective in extending the shelf-life of both acidic and low-acidic fruit juices. Moreover, the energetic costs and the carbon footprint of HS-RT are considerably lower than those of refrigeration, therefore, HS-RT could be a reliable and environmentally friendly alternative to conventional cold storage. However, before industrial implementation, much more research is needed to clarify the effects of the storage conditions on the agents that cause fruit juice deterioration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Trends in Beverage Processing)
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Review
Thermal and Non-Thermal Physical Methods for Improving Polyphenol Extraction in Red Winemaking
Beverages 2019, 5(3), 47; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages5030047 - 01 Aug 2019
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 1722
Abstract
Maceration-fermentation is a critical stage in the elaboration of high-quality red wine. During this stage, the solid parts of the grape berries remain in contact with the fermenting must in order to extract polyphenols mainly located in the grape skin cells. Extracted polyphenols [...] Read more.
Maceration-fermentation is a critical stage in the elaboration of high-quality red wine. During this stage, the solid parts of the grape berries remain in contact with the fermenting must in order to extract polyphenols mainly located in the grape skin cells. Extracted polyphenols have a considerable impact on sensory properties (color, flavor, astringency, and bitterness) and on the aging behavior of red wine. In order to obtain wines with a sufficient proportion of those compounds, long maceration times are required. The presence of the solid parts of the grapes during red wine fermentation involves several problems for the wineries such as production capacity reduction, higher energy consumption for controlling the fermentation temperature and labor and energy consumption for periodically pump the grape must over the skin mass. Physical techniques based on heating such as thermovinification and flash expansion are currently being applied in wineries to improve the extraction of polyphenols and to reduce maceration time. However, these techniques present a series of problems derived from the heating of the grapes that affect wine quality. A series of recent studies have demonstrated that non-thermal innovative technologies such as pulsed electric fields (PEF) and ultrasound may represent effective alternatives to heating for assisting polyphenol extraction. In terms of general product quality and energetic requirements, this review compares these thermal and non-thermal physical technologies that aim to reduce maceration time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Trends in Beverage Processing)
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