Special Issue "Bio-Batteries"

A special issue of Batteries (ISSN 2313-0105).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Seokheun Choi

Bioelectronics & Microsystems Laboratory (BML), Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, State University of New York, Binghamton, NY, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: BioMEMS; Microfluidics; Paper-based devices; High-throughput Sensing Arrays; Point-of-care Biosensors; Gas sensors; Sweat Biosensors; Gut Biosensors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The next generation of sustainable and portable power could come from bioengineering and biotechnology. Bio-batteries are energy-conversion devices based on bio-catalytic processes, bio-mimetics, bio-materials, bio-inspired materials, or biologically enhanced components. Bio-batteries have attracted significant research interest and have gained acceptance as a “green” energy alternative of the future, due to their sustainability, renewability, and eco-friendly properties. Despite their vast potential, however, our ability of how to harness the potential of bio-battery technology lags, due to a lack of in-depth understanding of the mechanisms for energy harvesting from biological materials and fundamental factors that maximize biological power-generating capabilities. In this Special Issue, we welcome review articles and original research papers focusing on recent progress and developments in bio-batteries, with further scientific and technological challenges. This Special Issue is also dedicated to new bioenergy-conversion technologies in the framework of emerging and demanding applications.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

-      Biological fuel cells
-      Enzymatic fuel cells
-      Microbial fuel cells
-      Bio-solar cells
-      Bio-inspired batteries
-      Biomaterials for batteries
-      Bio-battery management systems
-      Emerging technologies and applications of bio-batteries
-      Bio-battery pack design

Dr. Seokheun “Sean” Choi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Batteries is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Bio-batteries
  • Bio-fuel cells
  • Bioelectrochemical devices
  • Enzymatic fuel cells
  • Microbial fuel cells

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Factors Affecting the Effectiveness of Bioelectrochemical System Applications: Data Synthesis and Meta-Analysis
Received: 2 June 2018 / Revised: 4 July 2018 / Accepted: 6 July 2018 / Published: 25 July 2018
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Abstract
Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are promising bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) for simultaneous wastewater treatment and energy/resource recovery. Unlike conventional fuel cells that are based on stable chemical reactions, these BESs are sensitive to environmental and operating conditions, such as
[...] Read more.
Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are promising bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) for simultaneous wastewater treatment and energy/resource recovery. Unlike conventional fuel cells that are based on stable chemical reactions, these BESs are sensitive to environmental and operating conditions, such as temperature, pH, external resistance, etc. Substrate type, electrode material, and reactor configuration are also important factors affecting power generation in MFCs and hydrogen production in MECs. In order to discuss the influence of these above factors on the performance of MFCs and MECs, this study analyzes published data via data synthesis and meta-analysis. The results revealed that domestic wastewater would be more suitable for treatment using MFCs or MECs, due to their lower toxicity for anode biofilms compared to swine wastewater and landfill leachate. The optimal temperature was 25–35 °C, optimal pH was 6–7, and optimal external resistance was 100–1000 Ω. Although systems using carbon cloth as the electrodes demonstrated better performance (due to carbon cloth’s large surface area for microbial growth), the high prices of this material and other existing carbonaceous materials make it inappropriate for practical applications. To scale up and commercialize MFCs and MECs in the future, enhanced system performance and stability are needed, and could be possibly achieved with improved system designs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bio-Batteries)
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Open AccessArticle On-Demand Micro-Power Generation from an Origami-Inspired Paper Biobattery Stack
Received: 9 February 2018 / Revised: 12 March 2018 / Accepted: 16 March 2018 / Published: 21 March 2018
PDF Full-text (2487 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
We use origami to create a compact, scalable three-dimensional (3-D) biobattery stack that delivers on-demand energy to the portable biosensors. Folding allows a two-dimensional (2-D) paper sheet possessing predefined functional components to form nine 3-D microbial fuel cells (MFCs), and connect them serially
[...] Read more.
We use origami to create a compact, scalable three-dimensional (3-D) biobattery stack that delivers on-demand energy to the portable biosensors. Folding allows a two-dimensional (2-D) paper sheet possessing predefined functional components to form nine 3-D microbial fuel cells (MFCs), and connect them serially within a small and single unit (5.6 cm × 5.6 cm). We load the biocatalyst Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 in predefined areas that form the MFCs, and freeze-dry them for long-term storage. The biobattery stack generates a maximum power and current of 20 μW and 25 μA, respectively, via microbial metabolism when the freeze-dried cells are rehydrated with readily available wastewater. This work establishes an innovative strategy to revolutionize the fabrication, storage, operation, and application of paper-based MFCs, which could potentially make energy available even in resource-limited settings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bio-Batteries)
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