Special Issue "Oxidative Stress and Inflammation as Targets for Novel Preventive and Therapeutic Approaches in Non-communicable Diseases III"

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Outcomes of Antioxidants and Oxidative Stress".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2022 | Viewed by 5266

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Chiara Nediani
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Experimental and Clinical Biomedical Science “Mario Serio”, University of Florence, Viale G.B. Morgagni 50, 50134 Firenze, Italy
Interests: oxidative stress; redox signaling; autophagy; heart failure; oleuropein; bioactive natural compounds; polyphenols
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Jessica Ruzzolini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Experimental and Clinical Biomedical Sciences “Mario Serio”, University of Florence, 50134 Florence, Italy
Interests: cancer; drug resistance; nutraceutics; complementary therapy; tumor microenvironment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The success of the Special Issue “Oxidative Stress and Inflammation as Targets for Novel Preventive and Therapeutic Approaches in Non-Communicable Diseases II” has prompted us to propose a third part with the aim of keeping interest high among the research community in this relevant and fascinating topic. Non-communicable diseases  (NCDs), including cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, diabetes mellitus, and chronic kidney disease,  are chronic diseases characterized by a long duration and very slow progression that account for most aging-related diseases. NCDs represent the main cause of death and disability for the general population regardless of age, region, or gender. The common features in NCDs are inflammation, oxidative stress, and dysregulated autophagy that contribute to the pathogenesis and evolution of the diseases. Awareness is growing regarding established specific biomarkers of these features that help to reach a correct diagnosis and to open up novel strategies of assessment and intervention for the disorders. We invite you to submit your latest research findings or a review article to this Special Issue which will clarify the role of oxidative stress and inflammation, their interplay with autophagy, as well as their modulation through signaling pathways via novel preventive and therapeutic strategies, including drug or natural active compounds and their combination, in cell culture systems and preclinical animal models. Human clinical studies aiming to analyze the effects (and eventually the gender response) of diets, functional foods, or natural bioactive compounds in the prevention or therapy of NCDs are also welcome.

Prof. Dr. Chiara Nediani
Dr. Monica Dinu
Dr. Jessica Ruzzolini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antioxidants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  •  oxidative stress
  •  inflammation
  •  redox signaling
  •  bioactive compounds
  •  cancer
  •  cardiovascular disease
  •  metabolic disease
  •  chronic kidney disease
  •  aging
  •  Alzheimer's disease
  •  gender difference
  •  dietary intervention
  •  meta-analysis

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

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Article
Gastroprotective Effect of Anisomeles indica on Aspirin-Induced Gastric Ulcer in Mice
Antioxidants 2022, 11(12), 2327; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11122327 - 24 Nov 2022
Viewed by 120
Abstract
Gastric ulcers are commonly seen in the upper gastrointestinal tract and may be related to the Helicobacter pylori infection and the use of aspirin, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). Typically, proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) are used to treat gastric ulcers; however, adverse effects have [...] Read more.
Gastric ulcers are commonly seen in the upper gastrointestinal tract and may be related to the Helicobacter pylori infection and the use of aspirin, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). Typically, proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) are used to treat gastric ulcers; however, adverse effects have emerged following long-term treatment. Natural medicines are used as alternative therapeutic agents in the treatment of gastric ulcers, with few side effects. Despite various reports on the anti-H. pylori and anti-gastric cancer activities of Anisomeles indica, its gastroprotective effect on ulcers remains undetermined. This study investigated the protective effect of A. indica on aspirin-induced gastric ulcers in murine models. Our results show that three fractions of ethanol-extracted A. indica inhibited aspirin-induced gastric injury. Among these, A. indica Fraction 1 was observed to enrich ovatodiolide, which effectively diminished gastric acidity and alleviated aspirin-induced inflammation in the stomach. Our results provide evidence that A. indica could be developed as an effective therapeutic agent for gastroprotective purposes. Full article
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Article
An Oleocanthal-Enriched EVO Oil Extract Induces the ROS Production in Gastric Cancer Cells and Potentiates the Effect of Chemotherapy
Antioxidants 2022, 11(9), 1762; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11091762 - 07 Sep 2022
Viewed by 508
Abstract
Oleocanthal, a minor polar compound in extra-virgin olive (EVO) oil, contains anticancer properties, which should be encouraged in its use in oncology. Gastric Cancer (GC), a very aggressive human cancer, is often diagnosed at advanced stages, when surgery is substituted or supported by [...] Read more.
Oleocanthal, a minor polar compound in extra-virgin olive (EVO) oil, contains anticancer properties, which should be encouraged in its use in oncology. Gastric Cancer (GC), a very aggressive human cancer, is often diagnosed at advanced stages, when surgery is substituted or supported by chemotherapy (CT). However, CT frequently fails due to the patient’s resistance to the treatment. Thus, the aim of this study is to verify whether an OC-enriched EVO oil extract fraction (OCF) may be useful in order to overcome a resistance to GC. We evaluated the OCF effects on an AGS gastric adenocarcinoma cell line wild type (AGS wt) and on its subpopulations resistant to 5-fluorouracil (5FUr), Paclitaxel (TAXr) or cisplatin (CISr). We found that a 60 µM dose of the OCF acts on the AGS wt, 5FUr and TAXr, leading to the cell cycle inhibition and to a ROS production, but not on CISr cells. Resistance of CISr to the OCF seems to be due to higher levels of antioxidant-enzymes that can counteract the OCF-induced ROS production. Moreover, using the OCF plus 5-fluorouracil, Paclitaxel or cisplatin, we found a potentiating effect compared with a mono-treatment in all resistant GC cells, including CISr. In conclusion, the use of the OCF in the management of GC has shown very interesting advantages, opening-up the possibility to evaluate the efficacy of the OCF in vivo, as a valid adjuvant in the treatment of resistant GC. Full article
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Article
Intrarenal Arterial Transplantation of Dexmedetomidine Preconditioning Adipose Stem-Cell-Derived Microvesicles Confers Further Therapeutic Potential to Attenuate Renal Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury through miR-122-5p/Erythropoietin/Apoptosis Axis
Antioxidants 2022, 11(9), 1702; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11091702 - 30 Aug 2022
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Abstract
Intravenous adipose mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs) attenuate renal ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury but with major drawbacks, including the lack of a specific homing effect after systemic infusion, cell trapping in the lung, and early cell death in the damaged microenvironment. We examined whether intrarenal [...] Read more.
Intravenous adipose mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs) attenuate renal ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury but with major drawbacks, including the lack of a specific homing effect after systemic infusion, cell trapping in the lung, and early cell death in the damaged microenvironment. We examined whether intrarenal arterial transplantation of dexmedetomidine (DEX) preconditioning ADSC-derived microvesicles (DEX-MVs) could promote further therapeutic potential to reduce renal IR injury. We evaluated the effect of DEX-MVs on NRK-52E cells migration, hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R)-induced cell death, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) amount and renal IR model in rats. IR was established by bilateral 45 min ischemia followed by 4 h reperfusion. Intrarenal MVs or DEX-MVs were administered prior to ischemia. Renal oxidative stress, hemodynamics and function, western blot, immunohistochemistry, and tubular injury scores were determined. The miR-122-5p expression in kidneys was analyzed using microarrays and quantitative RT-PCR and its action target was predicted by TargetScan. DEX-MVs were more efficient than MVs to increase migration capability and to further decrease H/R-induced cell death and ROS level in NRK-52E cells. Consistently, DEX-MVs were better than MV in increasing CD44 expression, improving IR-depressed renal hemodynamics and renal erythropoietin expression, inhibiting IR-enhanced renal ROS level, tubular injury score, miR-122-5p expression, pNF-κB expression, Bax/caspase 3/poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-mediated apoptosis, blood urea nitrogen, and creatinine levels. The use of NRK-52E cells confirmed that miR-122-5p mimic via inhibiting erythropoietin expression exacerbated Bax-mediated apoptosis, whereas miR-122-5p inhibitor via upregulating erythropoietin and Bcl-2 expression reduced apoptosis. In summary, intrarenal arterial DEX-MV conferred further therapeutic potential to reduce renal IR injury through the miR-122-5p/erythropoietin/apoptosis axis. Full article
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Article
Effects of 2-Year Nutritional and Lifestyle Intervention on Oxidative and Inflammatory Statuses in Individuals of 55 Years of Age and over at High Cardiovascular Risk
Antioxidants 2022, 11(7), 1326; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11071326 - 05 Jul 2022
Viewed by 893
Abstract
Obesity and overweight are disorders with high impact on the morbidity and mortality of chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). We aim to assess the effects of 2-year nutritional and lifestyle intervention on oxidative and inflammatory [...] Read more.
Obesity and overweight are disorders with high impact on the morbidity and mortality of chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). We aim to assess the effects of 2-year nutritional and lifestyle intervention on oxidative and inflammatory status in individuals of 55 years of age and over at high CVD risk. Participants (n = 100 individuals of 55 years of age and over living in the Balearic Islands, Spain) were randomized into control and intervention group. Anthropometric and haematological parameters, blood pressure and physical activity were measured before and after the intervention. Oxidative and inflammatory biomarkers in plasma, urine, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and neutrophils were determined. A higher reduction in abdominal obesity, blood pressure and triglycerides levels was observed after a 2-year intervention. An improvement of oxidative stress and proinflammatory status was demonstrated with a significant reduction in myeloperoxidase, xanthine oxidase, malondialdehyde and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP1) levels, and an increase in polyphenols in plasma was observed. A decrease in reactive oxygen species production in PBMCs and neutrophils levels after zymosan and lipopolysaccharide activation was found in the intervention group with respect to the control group. The intervention with hypocaloric Mediterranean Diet and customized physical activity improves oxidative stress and proinflammatory status and could contribute to decreasing the CVD risk. Full article
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Article
SOD3 and IL-18 Predict the First Kidney Disease-Related Hospitalization or Death during the One-Year Follow-Up Period in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease
Antioxidants 2022, 11(6), 1198; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11061198 - 18 Jun 2022
Viewed by 769
Abstract
End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients experience oxidative stress due to excess exogenous or endogenous oxidants and insufficient antioxidants. Hence, oxidative stress and inflammation cause endothelial damage, contributing to vascular dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Therefore, ESRD patients suffer more cardiovascular and hospitalization events than healthy [...] Read more.
End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients experience oxidative stress due to excess exogenous or endogenous oxidants and insufficient antioxidants. Hence, oxidative stress and inflammation cause endothelial damage, contributing to vascular dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Therefore, ESRD patients suffer more cardiovascular and hospitalization events than healthy people. This study aims to test the correlations between ROS, SOD3, IL-2, IL-6, and IL-18 and the first kidney disease-related hospitalization or death events in ESRD patients undergoing regular hemodialysis. A total of 212 participants was enrolled, including 45 normal healthy adults and 167 ESRD patients on regular dialysis. Blood samples from all participants were collected for ROS, SOD3, IL-2, IL-6, and IL-18 measurement at the beginning of the study, and every kidney disease-related admission or death was recorded for the next year. Multivariate analysis was conducted by fitting a linear regression model, logistic regression model, and Cox proportional hazards model to estimate the adjusted effects of risk factors, prognostic factors, or predictors on continuous, binary, and survival outcome data. The results showed that plasma SOD3 and serum IL-18 were two strong predictors of the first kidney disease-related hospitalization or death. In the Cox proportional hazards models (run in R), higher IL-18 concentration (>69.054 pg/mL) was associated with a hazard ratio of 3.376 for the first kidney disease-related hospitalization or death (95% CI: 1.2644 to 9.012), while log(SOD3) < 4.723 and dialysis clearance (Kt/V; 1.11 < value < 1.869) had a hazard ratio = 0.2730 (95% CI: 0.1133 to 0.6576) for reducing future kidney disease-related hospitalization or death. Other markers, including body mass index (BMI), transferrin saturation, total iron binding capacity, and sodium and alkaline phosphate, were also found to be significant in our study. These results reveal the new predictors SOD3 and IL-18 for the medical care of end-stage renal disease patients. Full article
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Article
Paraoxonase-1 Regulation of Renal Inflammation and Fibrosis in Chronic Kidney Disease
Antioxidants 2022, 11(5), 900; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11050900 - 30 Apr 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 860
Abstract
Papraoxonase-1 (PON1) is a hydrolytic lactonase enzyme that is synthesized in the liver and circulates attached to high-density lipoproteins (HDL). Clinical studies have demonstrated an association between diminished PON-1 and the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, whether decreased PON-1 is mechanistically [...] Read more.
Papraoxonase-1 (PON1) is a hydrolytic lactonase enzyme that is synthesized in the liver and circulates attached to high-density lipoproteins (HDL). Clinical studies have demonstrated an association between diminished PON-1 and the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, whether decreased PON-1 is mechanistically linked to renal injury is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that the absence of PON-1 is mechanistically linked to the progression of renal inflammation and injury in CKD. Experiments were performed on control Dahl salt-sensitive rats (SSMcwi, hereafter designated SS rats) and Pon1 knock-out rats (designated SS-Pon1em1Mcwi, hereafter designated SS-PON-1 KO rats) generated by injecting a CRISPR targeting the sequence into SSMcwi rat embryos. The resulting mutation is a 7 bp frameshift insertion in exon 4 of the PON-1 gene. First, to examine the renal protective role of PON-1 in settings of CKD, ten-week-old, age-matched male rats were maintained on a high-salt diet (8% NaCl) for up to 5 weeks to initiate the salt-sensitive hypertensive renal disease characteristic of this model. We found that SS-PON-1 KO rats demonstrated several hallmarks of increased renal injury vs. SS rats including increased renal fibrosis, sclerosis, and tubular injury. SS-PON-1 KO also demonstrated increased recruitment of immune cells in the renal interstitium, as well as increased expression of inflammatory genes compared to SS rats (all p < 0.05). SS-PON-1 KO rats also showed a significant (p < 0.05) decline in renal function and increased renal oxidative stress compared to SS rats, despite no differences in blood pressure between the two groups. These findings suggest a new role for PON-1 in regulating renal inflammation and fibrosis in the setting of chronic renal disease independent of blood pressure. Full article
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Review

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Review
Ageing and Low-Level Chronic Inflammation: The Role of the Biological Clock
Antioxidants 2022, 11(11), 2228; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11112228 - 11 Nov 2022
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Abstract
Ageing is a multifactorial physiological manifestation that occurs inexorably and gradually in all forms of life. This process is linked to the decay of homeostasis due to the progressive decrease in the reparative and regenerative capacity of tissues and organs, with reduced physiological [...] Read more.
Ageing is a multifactorial physiological manifestation that occurs inexorably and gradually in all forms of life. This process is linked to the decay of homeostasis due to the progressive decrease in the reparative and regenerative capacity of tissues and organs, with reduced physiological reserve in response to stress. Ageing is closely related to oxidative damage and involves immunosenescence and tissue impairment or metabolic imbalances that trigger inflammation and inflammasome formation. One of the main ageing-related alterations is the dysregulation of the immune response, which results in chronic low-level, systemic inflammation, termed “inflammaging”. Genetic and epigenetic changes, as well as environmental factors, promote and/or modulate the mechanisms of ageing at the molecular, cellular, organ, and system levels. Most of these mechanisms are characterized by time-dependent patterns of variation driven by the biological clock. In this review, we describe the involvement of ageing-related processes with inflammation in relation to the functioning of the biological clock and the mechanisms operating this intricate interaction. Full article
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Review
Roles of Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Vascular Endothelial Dysfunction-Related Disease
Antioxidants 2022, 11(10), 1958; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11101958 - 30 Sep 2022
Viewed by 473
Abstract
Oxidative stress and chronic inflammation play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis develops as the first step of vascular endothelial dysfunction induced by complex molecular mechanisms. Vascular endothelial dysfunction leads to oxidative stress and inflammation of vessel walls, which in [...] Read more.
Oxidative stress and chronic inflammation play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis develops as the first step of vascular endothelial dysfunction induced by complex molecular mechanisms. Vascular endothelial dysfunction leads to oxidative stress and inflammation of vessel walls, which in turn enhances vascular endothelial dysfunction. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and vascular wall oxidative stress and chronic inflammation make a vicious cycle that leads to the development of atherosclerosis. Simultaneously capturing and accurately evaluating the association of vascular endothelial function with oxidative stress and inflammation would be useful for elucidating the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, determining treatment efficacy, and predicting future cardiovascular complications. Intervention in both areas is expected to inhibit the progression of atherosclerosis and prevent cardiovascular complications. Full article
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