Special Issue "Natural Products in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention"

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Outcomes of Antioxidants and Oxidative Stress".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Mihalis I. Panagiotidis

Department of Applied Sciences, University of Northumbria, Newcastle, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: carcinogenesis; disease mechanisms; apoptosis; epigenetics; oxidative stress; natural products; experimental therapeutics; drug development; disease prevention; disease biomarkers

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Although it is commonly accepted that natural products can promote health and prevent disease, quite a bit of scepticism exists (among the public and in the scientific community) about their usage. This is primarily because of a lack of proper documentation of their safety due to an insufficient understanding of their mode of action, as well as a lack of target specificity, since they can induce a plethora of biological effects involving various targets in many cellular cascades. For this reason, the aim of this Special Issue is to provide the state-of-the art as to how these compounds exert their health-promoting and disease-preventing properties in various physiologically relevant in vitro and/or in vivo models currently used in an experimental setting.

Potential authors are invited to contribute research and/or review manuscripts that bring together the latest research findings on this topic. In particular, emphasis is placed on mechanistic studies delineating the underlined pathways by which natural products exert their health-promoting and/or disease preventing properties. In addition, their potential benefit in the context of nutritional therapy (i.e. acting as single therapeutic agents or in combination with other established clinical therapeutic strategies) is also of interest. Finally, of great importance are manuscripts focusing on the area(s) of utilizing nutrigenomic/nutriepigenomic approaches in identifying key targets and/or cellular pathways involved in disease chemoprevention and/or health maintenance/promotion induced by natural products.

Prof. Mihalis Panagiotidis
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antioxidants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antioxidants
  • phytochemicals
  • natural products
  • free radicals
  • oxidative stress
  • nutrigenomics
  • nutriepigenomics
  • nutritional biomarkers
  • nutritional intervention
  • nutritional therapy
  • chemoprevention
  • molecular nutrition
  • biochemical nutrition

Published Papers (8 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-8
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Effect of Propolis on Diet-Induced Hyperlipidemia and Atherogenic Indices in Mice
Antioxidants 2019, 8(6), 156; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8060156
Received: 1 April 2019 / Revised: 9 May 2019 / Accepted: 22 May 2019 / Published: 3 June 2019
PDF Full-text (2312 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Obesity, a major health problem worldwide, is associated with increased cardiovascular risk factors, such as dyslipidemia, glucose intolerance, and hypertension. We investigated the antioxidative capacity of the ethanol extract of propolis (EEP) and its effect on the lipid profile, the hepatorenal function, and [...] Read more.
Obesity, a major health problem worldwide, is associated with increased cardiovascular risk factors, such as dyslipidemia, glucose intolerance, and hypertension. We investigated the antioxidative capacity of the ethanol extract of propolis (EEP) and its effect on the lipid profile, the hepatorenal function, and the atherogenic indices in mice fed with a high-fat diet (HFD). EEP (50 mg/kg) was given orally to mice for 30 days. After the treatments, levels of the serum total triglyceride and cholesterol, the high density lipoprotein (HDL-c) and low density lipoprotein (LDL-c) cholesterols, the serum enzymes, and the metabolites were measured, and atherogenic indices [atherogenic index of plasma (AIP); cardiac risk ratio (CRR); cardioprotective index (CPI); atherogenic coefficient (AC)] were calculated and compared with the antioxidant, the reducing power, the radical-scavenging, and the chelating activity of EEP. The HFD diet with EEP significantly reduced the negative lipid profile and lowered AIP, CRR, and AC and increased CPI in animals on a HFD. In addition, EEP reduced the weight of mice and lipid accumulation in the liver, and it had significant in vitro antioxidative activities. The EEP possesses anti-hyperlipidemic and antioxidant activity and exhibits protective action on the cardiovascular system and hepatorenal functions. Our results contribute towards the validation of the traditional use of propolis as a food supplement in aiding hyperlipidemic disorders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Products in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Propolis Extracts Inhibit UV-Induced Photodamage in Human Experimental In Vitro Skin Models
Antioxidants 2019, 8(5), 125; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8050125
Received: 28 February 2019 / Revised: 1 May 2019 / Accepted: 5 May 2019 / Published: 9 May 2019
PDF Full-text (5265 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the antioxidant, photoprotective, and antiaging effects of Greek propolis. Propolis was subjected to n-heptane or methanol extraction. Total phenolic/flavonoid content and antioxidant potential were determined in the extracts. Promising extracts were evaluated for their cytoprotective [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to assess the antioxidant, photoprotective, and antiaging effects of Greek propolis. Propolis was subjected to n-heptane or methanol extraction. Total phenolic/flavonoid content and antioxidant potential were determined in the extracts. Promising extracts were evaluated for their cytoprotective properties using human immortalized keratinocyte (HaCaT) or reconstituted human skin tissue following exposure to UVB. Assessment of cytotoxicity, DNA damage, oxidative status, and gene/protein expression levels of various matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were performed. The propolis methanolic fractions exhibited higher total phenolic and flavonoid contents and significant in vitro antioxidant activity. Incubation of HaCaT cells with certain methanolic extracts significantly decreased the formation of DNA strand breaks following exposure to UVB and attenuated UVB-induced decrease in cell viability. The extracts had no remarkable effect on the total antioxidant status, but significantly lowered total protein carbonyl content used as a marker for protein oxidation in HaCaT cells. MMP-1, -3, -7, and -9, monitored as endpoints of antiaging efficacy, were significantly reduced by propolis following UVB exposure in a model of reconstituted skin tissue. In conclusion, propolis protects against the oxidative and photodamaging effects of UVB and could be further explored as a promising agent for developing natural antiaging strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Products in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Flavonoid Analysis and Antioxidant Activities of the Bryonia alba L. Aerial Parts
Antioxidants 2019, 8(4), 108; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8040108
Received: 5 April 2019 / Revised: 16 April 2019 / Accepted: 17 April 2019 / Published: 20 April 2019
PDF Full-text (11467 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Bryonia alba L. is the only Bryonia species found in Romanian flora, being known as a remedy for inflammatory pathologies or for its hepatoprotective and adaptogen activities. The present investigation studied the flavonoid composition and antioxidant activities of the aerial parts of this [...] Read more.
Bryonia alba L. is the only Bryonia species found in Romanian flora, being known as a remedy for inflammatory pathologies or for its hepatoprotective and adaptogen activities. The present investigation studied the flavonoid composition and antioxidant activities of the aerial parts of this species. Flavonoid profile was evaluated by HPLC coupled with Diode Array Detection (DAD), while antioxidant capacity was assessed by various methods, testing different antioxidant mechanisms: DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl), CUPRAC (cupric reducing antioxidant capacity), FRAP (ferric reducing ability of plasma), TEAC (Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity), EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance method) and SNPAC (silver nanoparticles antioxidant capacity). Cytotoxicity was tested on human cancerous and healthy cell lines. Anti-plasmodial tests were performed on two strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Whole organism toxicity was assessed on zebrafish larvae. The HPLC-DAD analysis proved the presence of lutonarin, saponarin, isoorientin, and isovitexin as the major flavonoids in the composition of tested samples. Significant results were obtained for all antioxidant capacity assays. The cytotoxicity tests proved the absence of cellular and parasitic toxicity and these results were confirmed by the lack of toxicity on the zebrafish larvae model. This study proves a promising potential of the aerial parts of Bryonia alba L. as antioxidant agents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Products in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention)
Open AccessArticle
Effects of Extra Virgin Olive Oil and Apples Enriched-Dark Chocolate on Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Patients with Cardiovascular Risk Factors: A Randomized Cross-Over Trial
Antioxidants 2019, 8(4), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8040088
Received: 27 February 2019 / Revised: 29 March 2019 / Accepted: 1 April 2019 / Published: 4 April 2019
PDF Full-text (1362 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Background: Endothelial dysfunction has been associated to cardiovascular outcomes in patients with cardiovascular risk factors. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play an important physiological role for their reparative potential of vascular integrity, but are numerically reduced and functionally impaired in patients with cardiovascular [...] Read more.
Background: Endothelial dysfunction has been associated to cardiovascular outcomes in patients with cardiovascular risk factors. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play an important physiological role for their reparative potential of vascular integrity, but are numerically reduced and functionally impaired in patients with cardiovascular risks. This study assesses the effects of Extra Virgin Olive Oil (EVOO) and apple-enriched dark chocolate intake on the blood levels of EPCs. Methods: Thirty volunteers with cardiovascular risk factors, enrolled in a randomised, crossover, four-weeks trial, received a solid dark chocolate bar (40 g/day) containing 10% EVOO or 2.5% dry apples. Urine samples were analyzed for endogenous metabolites. Circulating EPCs levels, clinical data and anthropometric examinations were collected. Results: 26 volunteers (M/F:14/12, 51 ± 9 years of age) completed the study. Comparison of pre-post intervention revealed a significant increase in EPCs levels associated with EVOO-dark chocolate consumption. Most biochemical parameters were not significantly modified by both chocolates. Conclusions: This study shows that a daily consumption of a non fattening dose of dark chocolate enriched with EVOO improves blood levels of EPCs, a well known surrogate biologic marker for endothelial function. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Products in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Resveratrol Anti-Obesity Effects: Rapid Inhibition of Adipocyte Glucose Utilization
Antioxidants 2019, 8(3), 74; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8030074
Received: 27 February 2019 / Revised: 19 March 2019 / Accepted: 22 March 2019 / Published: 26 March 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1519 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Studies in animal models of diabetes and obesity have shown that resveratrol mitigates complications of metabolic diseases, beyond those resulting from oxidative stress. Furthermore, results obtained with cultured preadipocytes have also revealed that prolonged resveratrol treatment impairs adipogenesis. Considering the role of adipocytes [...] Read more.
Studies in animal models of diabetes and obesity have shown that resveratrol mitigates complications of metabolic diseases, beyond those resulting from oxidative stress. Furthermore, results obtained with cultured preadipocytes have also revealed that prolonged resveratrol treatment impairs adipogenesis. Considering the role of adipocytes in the hypertrophy of fat stores, and keeping in mind that insulin is the main trigger of excessive energy storage during post-prandial periods, the present study aimed to investigate how short-term effects of resveratrol can limit glucose disposal in a gut-adipose tissue axis. We found that resveratrol exhibits a more potent inhibitory capacity towards α-glucosidase than pancreatic lipase activity. Resveratrol also rapidly blunts glucose transport in mature fat cells by counteracting the effect of insulin and insulin-like lipogenic agents. Within two hours, resveratrol also inhibited the incorporation of glucose into lipids of adipocytes, which was unaffected by membrane cholesterol depletion. Moreover, the comparison between adipocytes with invalidated semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase activity and their control, or between resveratrol and several inhibitors, did not indicate that the recently described interaction of resveratrol with amine oxidases was involved in its antilipogenic effect. Caffeine and piceatannol, previously said to interact with glucose carriers, also inhibit lipogenesis in adipocytes, whereas other antioxidant phytochemicals do not reproduce such an antilipogenic effect. This study highlights the diverse first steps by which resveratrol impairs excessive fat accumulation, indicating that this natural molecule and its derivatives deserve further studies to develop their potential anti-obesity properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Products in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Production of a Novel Functional Fruit Beverage Consisting of Cornelian Cherry Juice and Probiotic Bacteria
Antioxidants 2018, 7(11), 163; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox7110163
Received: 1 October 2018 / Revised: 2 November 2018 / Accepted: 8 November 2018 / Published: 12 November 2018
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (246 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The present study describes the development of a novel functional beverage through the application of probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC (American Type Culture Collection) 14917 in Cornelian cherry juice fermentation. The probiotic was employed in free and immobilized in a delignified wheat bran carrier [...] Read more.
The present study describes the development of a novel functional beverage through the application of probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC (American Type Culture Collection) 14917 in Cornelian cherry juice fermentation. The probiotic was employed in free and immobilized in a delignified wheat bran carrier (DWB) form. Cornelian cherry juice was fermented for 24 h and then it was stored at 4 °C for 4 weeks. Several parameters were evaluated such as residual sugar, organic acid and alcohol levels, total phenolics content, and cell viability as well as consumers acceptance. Regarding sugar and organic acids analyses, it was proved that the probiotic free or immobilized biocatalyst was effective. The concentration of ethanol was maintained at low levels (0.3–0.9% v/v). The total phenolic content of fermented Cornelian cherry juice with immobilized cells was recorded in higher levels (214–264 mg GAE/100 mL) for all the cold storage time compared to fermented juice with free cells (165–199 mg GAE/100 mL) and non-fermented juice (135–169 mg GAE/100 mL). Immobilized cells retained their viability in higher levels (9.95 log cfu/mL at the 4th week) compared to free cells (7.36 log cfu/mL at the 4th week). No significant sensory differences were observed among the fermented and the non-fermented samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Products in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention)
Open AccessArticle
Bark of Passiflora edulis Treatment Stimulates Antioxidant Capacity, and Reduces Dyslipidemia and Body Fat in db/db Mice
Antioxidants 2018, 7(9), 120; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox7090120
Received: 24 July 2018 / Revised: 16 August 2018 / Accepted: 21 August 2018 / Published: 8 September 2018
PDF Full-text (1503 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Obesity is considered an important risk factor for several disorders, such as diabetes mellitus, systemic arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, and atherosclerosis, which are associated with inflammation and oxidative stress as a trigger factor. Passiflora edulis contains important bioactive compounds, such as phenolics, carotenoids, vitamin [...] Read more.
Obesity is considered an important risk factor for several disorders, such as diabetes mellitus, systemic arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, and atherosclerosis, which are associated with inflammation and oxidative stress as a trigger factor. Passiflora edulis contains important bioactive compounds, such as phenolics, carotenoids, vitamin C, and polyamines in pulp, leaves, seeds, and bark. Aim: To evaluate the effect of bark of Passiflora edulis (BPe) on body composition, and metabolic and oxidative stress parameters in genetically obese mice. Methods: Obese male db/db mice (n = 14 animals) received normal feeds and water ad libitum for 8 weeks. Then, animals were randomly divided to continue either receiving standard chow (obese, n = 7 (OB)) or feed with standard chow plus bark Passiflora edulis (BPe) (obese + BPe, n = 7 (OB + BPe)) for 8 more weeks, totaling 16 weeks. BPe was added to chow (7 g of BPe/kg of chow corresponding to 1.5 g/kg of body weight). The parameters evaluated in animals included food and caloric intake, body weight, body fat, plasma glucose, triglycerides, and total cholesterol. Malondialdehyde and antioxidant capacity were evaluated in plasma and organs. Groups were compared by Student t-test, with p < 0.05. Results: BPe reduced visceral and subcutaneous fat deposit and adiposity index, cholesterol and triglyceride levels, ameliorated the antioxidant capacity, and reduced malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. Conclusion: the bark of Passiflora edulis was effective in improving body composition, and metabolic and antioxidant parameters in obese mice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Products in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention)
Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
The Role of Isothiocyanates as Cancer Chemo-Preventive, Chemo-Therapeutic and Anti-Melanoma Agents
Antioxidants 2019, 8(4), 106; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8040106
Received: 4 February 2019 / Revised: 3 April 2019 / Accepted: 12 April 2019 / Published: 18 April 2019
PDF Full-text (788 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Many studies have shown evidence in support of the beneficial effects of phytochemicals in preventing chronic diseases, including cancer. Among such phytochemicals, sulphur-containing compounds (e.g., isothiocyanates (ITCs)) have raised scientific interest by exerting unique chemo-preventive properties against cancer pathogenesis. ITCs are the major [...] Read more.
Many studies have shown evidence in support of the beneficial effects of phytochemicals in preventing chronic diseases, including cancer. Among such phytochemicals, sulphur-containing compounds (e.g., isothiocyanates (ITCs)) have raised scientific interest by exerting unique chemo-preventive properties against cancer pathogenesis. ITCs are the major biologically active compounds capable of mediating the anticancer effect of cruciferous vegetables. Recently, many studies have shown that a higher intake of cruciferous vegetables is associated with reduced risk of developing various forms of cancers primarily due to a plurality of effects, including (i) metabolic activation and detoxification, (ii) inflammation, (iii) angiogenesis, (iv) metastasis and (v) regulation of the epigenetic machinery. In the context of human malignant melanoma, a number of studies suggest that ITCs can cause cell cycle growth arrest and also induce apoptosis in human malignant melanoma cells. On such basis, ITCs could serve as promising chemo-therapeutic agents that could be used in the clinical setting to potentiate the efficacy of existing therapies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Products in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention)
Figures

Figure 1

Antioxidants EISSN 2076-3921 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top