Advances in Natural Antioxidants for Food Improvement Volume 2

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921). This special issue belongs to the section "Natural and Synthetic Antioxidants".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2022) | Viewed by 12035

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, 15705 A Coruña, Spain
Interests: food chemistry; analytical chemistry; food technology; sensory analysis; natural antioxidants; proteomics
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Guest Editor
Centro Tecnológico de la Carne de Galicia, 32900 Orense, Spain
Interests: meat quality; genetic influences in meat quality; genetic improvement
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Guest Editor
Department of Zoology, Genetics and Physical Anthropology, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain
Interests: proteomics; peptidomics; analitical chemistry; bioinformatics; mass spectrometry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are delighted to be organizing Volume 2 of this Special Issue, entitled “Advances in Natural Antioxidants for Food Improvement”, especially given the success of the Volume 1, which you can read here, along with other publications, free of charge: https://www.mdpi.com/journal/antioxidants/special_issues/Antioxidants_Food_Improvement

The food industry generally uses synthetic antioxidants (BHT, BHA, TBHQ, PG) to control lipid and protein oxidation, although under legal constraints in several countries. Indeed, the use of these compounds has been linked to several health risks; therefore, current research strives to find replacements for these compounds in the form of natural antioxidants. In this context, a growing interest in the substitution of synthetic food antioxidants with natural antioxidants has led to research on vegetable sources of both terrestrial or marine origins. Another important aim is to identify other by-products to search for new antioxidants. For instance, in the meat industry, some processors in UE are already employing multi-functional ingredients, such as rosemary (E-392), approved for use as spices and natural flavours to limit oxidation, but extensive research with other natural sources is still in progress. To achieve this goal, it is necessary to focus on four critical aspects: a) The antioxidant activity measured by in vitro and in vivo tests, as well as in the food matrix. b) The knowledge of negative side effects, including toxicological aspects, which may be produced by the addition of an extract, essential oil or additive to meat products; therefore, even pro-oxidant effects should be taken into account. c) An optimal relationship between antioxidant concentrations and responses, avoiding a detriment to sensory aspects of the product and without prejudice to the shelf life and quality of foods. d) Economic and environmental aspects related to obtaining natural antioxidant extracts (type of solvents, green technologies used, operational costs, etc.) should be considered.

This challenge is a very complex issue, and for this reason, it remains unresolved and generates a continuous interest among the research community. Overall, the aim of this Special Issue is to present the latest scientific studies that focus on the different aforementioned practical aspects. Addressing all of these problems is of paramount importance to incorporate natural antioxidants into the food industry.

Dr. Daniel Franco Ruiz
Prof. Dr. Jose Lorenzo Manuel Rodriguez
Dr. María López-Pedrouso
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antioxidants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • natural antioxidants
  • foods
  • lipid and protein oxidation
  • sensorial properties
  • antioxidant capacity in vitro and in vivo
  • shelf-life
  • antioxidant active packaging
  • extract concentration and identification
  • modelling of antioxidant activity in foods
  • antioxidant activity from residual by-products in foods
  • practical applications of antioxidants in the food industry
  • toxicology aspects

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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13 pages, 582 KiB  
Article
Effect of Debittering with Different Solvents and Ultrasound on Carotenoids, Tocopherols, and Phenolics of Lupinus albus Seeds
by Lorenzo Estivi, Davide Fusi, Andrea Brandolini and Alyssa Hidalgo
Antioxidants 2022, 11(12), 2481; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11122481 - 16 Dec 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1638
Abstract
Lupin seeds represent a rich nutritional source of bioactive compounds, including antioxidant molecules such as carotenoids, tocopherols, and phenolics. However, before consumption, the lupin seeds must be debittered in order to remove their bitter and toxic alkaloids. This study analyzed the impact on [...] Read more.
Lupin seeds represent a rich nutritional source of bioactive compounds, including antioxidant molecules such as carotenoids, tocopherols, and phenolics. However, before consumption, the lupin seeds must be debittered in order to remove their bitter and toxic alkaloids. This study analyzed the impact on the bioactive compounds of Lupinus albus seeds of a recent time- and water-saving debittering method, which employs alternative washing solutions (0.5% or 1% of either NaCl or citric acid), with or without the assistance of ultrasound. The results were compared with those of two control methods using water or a NaCl solution. The sonication, when it was significant, led to a large loss of bioactive compounds, which was most likely due to its extraction capability. The seeds that were debittered without ultrasound presented high concentrations of tocopherols (172.8–241.3 mg/kg DM), carotenoids (10.9–25.1 mg/kg DM), and soluble-free (106.9–361.1 mg/kg DM), soluble-conjugated (93.9–118.9 mg/kg DM), and insoluble-bound (59.2–156.7 mg/kg DM) phenolics. The soluble-free fraction showed the greatest loss after a prolonged treatment. Overall, debittering with citric acid or NaCl preserved the highest concentration of antioxidant compounds by shortening the treatment time, thus preventing extensive leaching. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Natural Antioxidants for Food Improvement Volume 2)
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14 pages, 1851 KiB  
Article
Role of Solid Fat Content in Oxidative Stability of Low-Moisture Cracker Systems
by Thanh Phuong Vu, Cansu Ekin Gumus-Bonacina, Maria G. Corradini, Lili He, David Julian McClements and Eric A. Decker
Antioxidants 2022, 11(11), 2139; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11112139 - 28 Oct 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2062
Abstract
Lipid oxidation is a major pathway for the chemical deterioration of low-moisture foods. Little is known about how the physical properties of the fat used in crackers impact lipid oxidation kinetics. Fully hydrogenated soybean fat + interesterified soybean oil, fully hydrogenated soybean fat [...] Read more.
Lipid oxidation is a major pathway for the chemical deterioration of low-moisture foods. Little is known about how the physical properties of the fat used in crackers impact lipid oxidation kinetics. Fully hydrogenated soybean fat + interesterified soybean oil, fully hydrogenated soybean fat + sunflower oil, fully hydrogenated soybean oil, and soybean oil and interesterified fat alone were formulated to have varying solid fat content (SFC) at 55 °C but the same linoleic acid and tocopherol contents, so the fats had similar susceptibility to oxidation. A fluorescence probe showed that lipid mobility increased with decreasing SFC in both cracker doughs and fat blends, suggesting the probe could be used to monitor SFC directly in foods. Decreasing SFC decreased oxidation in crackers. Crackers made from interesterified fat (13.7% SFC) were more oxidatively stable (hexanal lag phase = 33 days) than crackers made from fat blends (hexanal lag phase = 24 days). These results suggest that blended fats result in regions of liquid oil high in unsaturated fatty acids within a food product prone to oxidation. Conversely, interesterified fats where unsaturated and saturated fatty acids are more evenly distributed on the triacylglycerols are more stable. Thus, interesterified fats could allow for the formulation of products higher in unsaturated fatty acids to improve nutritional profiles without sacrificing shelf life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Natural Antioxidants for Food Improvement Volume 2)
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25 pages, 3551 KiB  
Article
Novel Active Food Packaging Films Based on Gelatin-Sodium Alginate Containing Beetroot Peel Extract
by Moufida Chaari, Khaoula Elhadef, Sarra Akermi, Boutheina Ben Akacha, Mariam Fourati, Ahlem Chakchouk Mtibaa, Monia Ennouri, Tanmay Sarkar, Mohammad Ali Shariati, Maksim Rebezov, Slim Abdelkafi, Lotfi Mellouli and Slim Smaoui
Antioxidants 2022, 11(11), 2095; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11112095 - 24 Oct 2022
Cited by 30 | Viewed by 2746
Abstract
Currently, the exploration of natural colorants from vegetal waste has gained particular attention. Furthermore, incorporation of these natural sources into biopolymers is an encouraging environmentally friendly approach to establishing active films with biological activities for food packaging. The present study developed bioactive antioxidant [...] Read more.
Currently, the exploration of natural colorants from vegetal waste has gained particular attention. Furthermore, incorporation of these natural sources into biopolymers is an encouraging environmentally friendly approach to establishing active films with biological activities for food packaging. The present study developed bioactive antioxidant films based on gelatin-sodium alginate (NaAlg) incorporated with aqueous beetroot peel extract (BPE). Firstly, the effects of combining gelatin-NaAlg and BPE at 0.25, 0.5, and 1% on the mechanical, physical, antioxidant, and antibacterial properties of the films were analyzed. With increasing BPE, mechanico-physical properties and antioxidant and anti-foodborne pathogen capacities were enhanced. Likewise, when added to gelatin-NaAlg films, BPE remarkably increased the instrumental color properties. Moreover, during 14 days of storage at 4 °C, the impact of gelatin-NaAlg coating impregnated with BPE on microbial and chemical oxidation and on the sensory characteristics of beef meat samples was periodically assessed. Interestingly, by the end of the storage, BPE at 1% limited the microbial deterioration, enhanced the instrumental color, delayed chemical oxidation, and improved sensory traits. By practicing chemometrics tools (principal component analysis and heat maps), all data provided valuable information for categorizing all samples regarding microbiological and oxidative properties, sensory features, and instrumental color. Our findings revealed the ability of gelatin-NaAlg with BPE as an antioxidant to be employed as food packaging for meat preservation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Natural Antioxidants for Food Improvement Volume 2)
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17 pages, 1061 KiB  
Article
Maqui (Aristotelia chilensis (Mol.) Stuntz): A Natural Antioxidant to Improve Quality of Meat Patties
by Lidiana Velázquez, John Quiñones, Karla Inostroza, Gastón Sepúlveda, Rommy Díaz, Erick Scheuermann, Rubén Domínguez, José M. Lorenzo, Carla Velásquez and Néstor Sepúlveda
Antioxidants 2022, 11(7), 1405; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11071405 - 20 Jul 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2298
Abstract
Aristotelia chilensis is an endemic shrub of the South Pacific with high concentrations of bioactive compounds in its leaves and, therefore, it is highly valued. The effect of Aristotelia chilensis leaf powders (maqui leaf powders; Ma) on the quality and shelf life of [...] Read more.
Aristotelia chilensis is an endemic shrub of the South Pacific with high concentrations of bioactive compounds in its leaves and, therefore, it is highly valued. The effect of Aristotelia chilensis leaf powders (maqui leaf powders; Ma) on the quality and shelf life of beef patties during 7 days of storage was investigated. Five beef patties treatments were prepared: (1) Control without antioxidants (CT); (2) Beef patties with synthetic antioxidants plus color (250 mg/kg) (PL); (3) Beef patties with 500 ppm of maqui leaf powders (Ma500); (4) Beef patties with 1000 ppm of maqui leaf powders (Ma1000); and (5) Beef patties with 2000 ppm of maqui leaf powders (Ma2000). The quality of the beef patties was evaluated on day 0 and day 7 of storage by physicochemical analysis (moisture, ash and lipid content, color, pH, fatty acid profile and lipid oxidation) and organoleptic analysis. The addition of maqui leaf powders did not produce changes in the proximate composition of the beef patties. The pH for all treatments showed a range of 5.50–5.75 and significant differences (p < 0.05) were observed at the beginning and end of storage. The pH of the control beef patties increased during storage while the pH of the beef patties with synthetic and natural antioxidants decreased. Redness (a*) was the color indicator that was mostly affected by the inclusion of 1000 ppm and 2000 ppm powders. High lipid oxidation was observed in control samples on the seventh day of storage due to the high percentage of fat used in the formulation and the absence of any antioxidant. However, the Ma500, Ma1000, and Ma2000 treatments presented the lowest lipid oxidation rates (42.05%, 40.29%, and 43.14%, respectively) in comparison with the synthetic antioxidant (52.23%). This lipid inhibition is related to the strong antioxidant activity (29.75 µg/mL IC50 DPPH) of the maqui leaf powder due to its high content of total polyphenols (148.76 mg GAE/g), mainly characterized by having great amounts of hydroxybenzoic acids (82.5 mg GAE/g), flavonoids (7.1 mg QE/g), and hydroxycinnamic acids (3.7 mg CAE/g). Although minimal variations were observed in some individual fatty acids, and despite the trend to decrease MUFA and increase SFA with the maqui leaf powder addition, these differences were minimal and, according to the nutritional indices results, without any influence on the nutritional quality of the beef patties. The organoleptic analysis showed that the addition of maqui leaf powders did not affect the general acceptability of the new formulations. This study reports for the first time the substitution of synthetic antioxidants with Aristotelia chilensis leaves extract. Based on the results, it can be concluded that this ingredient can be used as an alternative for the production of raw meat products with clean labels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Natural Antioxidants for Food Improvement Volume 2)
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Review

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18 pages, 1877 KiB  
Review
Enhancement of Lipid Stability and Acceptability of Canned Seafood by Addition of Natural Antioxidant Compounds to the Packing Medium—A Review
by Santiago P. Aubourg
Antioxidants 2023, 12(2), 245; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox12020245 - 21 Jan 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2426
Abstract
Seafoods are known to include high contents of valuable constituents. However, they are reported to be highly perishable products, whose quality rapidly declines post-mortem, thus demanding efficient processing and storage. Among the traditional technologies, canning represents one of the most important means of [...] Read more.
Seafoods are known to include high contents of valuable constituents. However, they are reported to be highly perishable products, whose quality rapidly declines post-mortem, thus demanding efficient processing and storage. Among the traditional technologies, canning represents one of the most important means of marine species preservation. However, owing to the thermal sensitivity of the chemical constituents of marine species, remarkable degradative mechanisms can be produced and lead to important quality losses. The demand for better quality food makes the need for advanced preservation techniques a topic to be addressed continually in the case of seafood. One such strategy is the employment of preservative compounds obtained from natural resources. The current review provides an overview of the research carried out concerning the effect of the addition of bioactive compounds to the packing medium on the thermal stability of canned seafood. This review addresses the preservative effect of polyphenol-rich oils (i.e., extra virgin olive oil) and different kinds of products or extracts obtained from plants, algae and seafood by-products. In agreement with the great incidence of lipid damage on the nutritional and acceptability values during high-temperature seafood processing, this work is especially focussed on the inhibitory effect of lipid oxidation development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Natural Antioxidants for Food Improvement Volume 2)
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