Special Issue "Cultivar Development and Management Strategies for Sugarcane"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Horticultural and Floricultural Crops".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 April 2022) | Viewed by 5142

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Md Sariful Islam
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Sugarcane Production Research Unit, USDA ARS, Canal Point, FL 33438, USA
Interests: plant breeding; plant genetics; plant biotechnology; plant biology; genetic diversity
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Hardev Sandhu
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Univ. of Florida, Everglades Res. & Educ. Ctr., 3200 East Palm Beach Rd, Belle Glade, FL 33430, USA
Interests: sugarcane; lepidoptera; saccharum; arthropods; insect; entomology; invasive species

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sugarcane (a complex hybrid of Saccharum spp.) is a major sugar crop in the world and is responsible for approximately 70% of the world’s total sugar supply in the form of sucrose. Sugarcane is mainly cultivated in tropical and subtropical regions. There are several biotic and abiotic stresses that undermine the production potential of sugarcane cultivars. Therefore, continuous development of new and improved cultivars is the key for profitable and sustainable sugarcane production. There are many sugarcane cultivar development programs around the world where scientists conduct research on the science (genetics, molecular biology, agronomy, plant pathology, entomology, etc.) behind the development of high-yielding and insect pest and disease-resistant cultivars. Improved cultivars alone do not solely achieve the goals of profitable and sustainable sugarcane production; research is also conducted to evaluate new agronomic practices such as row spacing, tillage, irrigation, fertilization, planting and harvesting methods, etc. to develop best management practices. Publication of these research results is important for scientific advancement and improved sugarcane production. 

Dr. Md Sariful Islam
Dr. Hardev Sandhu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • breeding
  • genetics for selection
  • genotype by environment interaction
  • flowering
  • cultivar development
  • management practices
  • tillage
  • planting
  • harvesting
  • irrigation
  • fertilization

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Article
Physiological and Agronomic Traits of Certain Sugarcane Genotypes Grown under Field Conditions as Influenced by Early Drought Stress
Agronomy 2021, 11(11), 2319; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11112319 - 16 Nov 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 786
Abstract
Drought is one of the important problems that drastically affect sugarcane production in several countries. The objective of this research was to investigate the effects of early drought stress on physiological parameters and agronomic traits of six sugarcane genotypes under field conditions. The [...] Read more.
Drought is one of the important problems that drastically affect sugarcane production in several countries. The objective of this research was to investigate the effects of early drought stress on physiological parameters and agronomic traits of six sugarcane genotypes under field conditions. The experiment was arranged in a split plot in a completely randomized block design with three replications. The main plot was represented by three different water regimes: field capacity (FC), ½FC and rain-fed (RF), whereas the subplot consisted of six sugarcane genotypes: KK3 (drought tolerant), Q117 (drought tolerant), LK92-11 (drought susceptible), Ths98-271 (S. spontaneum), KK08-214 (the F1 hybrid derived from S. spontaneum × S. officinarum) and E08-4-019 (the F1 hybrid derived from Erianthus sp. × S. officinarum). The six sugarcane genotypes were subjected to three irrigation treatments. The 45-day-old plants of all sugarcane genotypes were exposed to drought by withholding water for 72 days. Certain photosynthetic parameters were measured in the leaves of four-month-old plants. Certain cane yield parameters were measured in the 12-month-old plants. The results showed that early drought stress decreased the maximum quantum yield of PSII efficiency, net photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate and stomatal conductance. Drought stress significantly (p ≤ 0.01) decreased cane yield. The cane yield and sugar yield of KK3 were significantly (p ≤ 0.01) higher than those of the other genotypes. The wild-type sugarcane and the F1 hybrids derived from the wild and commercial sugarcane could maintain better photosynthetic performance while encountering early drought stress. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultivar Development and Management Strategies for Sugarcane)
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Article
Survey of Sugarcane Yellow Leaf Virus in the Canal Point Breeding and Cultivar Development Program
Agronomy 2021, 11(10), 1948; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11101948 - 28 Sep 2021
Viewed by 645
Abstract
Sugarcane yellow leaf virus (SCYLV), a Polerovirus in the family Luteoviridea, causes yellow leaf disease (YLD). Yield losses from YLD have been reported from several countries in both symptomatic and asymptomatic sugarcane cultivars. The breeding nursery at Canal Point (CP) in 2016 [...] Read more.
Sugarcane yellow leaf virus (SCYLV), a Polerovirus in the family Luteoviridea, causes yellow leaf disease (YLD). Yield losses from YLD have been reported from several countries in both symptomatic and asymptomatic sugarcane cultivars. The breeding nursery at Canal Point (CP) in 2016 and primary and secondary seed increases in the CP cultivar development program at grower’s farm from 2015 to 2019 were surveyed for SCYLV infection by the tissue-blot immunoassay using polyclonal antibodies raised against SCYLV. More than 32% of varieties in the CP breeding nursery were infected with SCYLV in 2016. The SCYLV data of primary and secondary seedcane increases from 2015 to 2019 showed that out of 54 varieties screened at different locations, 12 had no SCYLV-positive plants, 24 had less than 5%, 5 had 6% to 12%, and 13 had 20% to 75% of the plants infected with SCYLV. The SCYLV screenings in varieties in the primary and secondary seed increase plantings provide growers an opportunity to acquire virus-free clean seedcane by apical meristem propagation to minimize the spread of the SCYLV and avoid yield losses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultivar Development and Management Strategies for Sugarcane)
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Article
Crop Nutrition and Yield Response of Bagasse Application on Sugarcane Grown on a Mineral Soil
Agronomy 2021, 11(8), 1526; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11081526 - 30 Jul 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 841
Abstract
The addition of agricultural by-products to mineral soils has the potential to improve crop production. This study aimed to determine the effects of the readily available sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum) milling by-product bagasse as a soil amendment on yields of sugarcane grown [...] Read more.
The addition of agricultural by-products to mineral soils has the potential to improve crop production. This study aimed to determine the effects of the readily available sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum) milling by-product bagasse as a soil amendment on yields of sugarcane grown on a sandy Entisol of South Florida. The field trial was conducted on a commercial sugarcane farm for three annual crop cycles (plant cane and two ratoons). Four treatments including 5 cm bagasse (85 ton ha−1); 10 cm bagasse (170 ton ha−1); 10 cm bagasse (170 ton ha−1) plus 336 kg ha−1 ammonium nitrate; and a control (without bagasse and ammonium nitrate) were evaluated. Results indicate that one single application of bagasse increased sugarcane biomass and sugar yield by approximately 23% in the plant cane year. A higher application rate of bagasse (10 cm of bagasse) was recommended since it had a longer effect on increasing sugarcane biomass and sugar yield. Bagasse application enhanced silicon (Si) supply and increased Si plant nutrition. However, the effects of bagasse on the other leaf nutrients were not significant. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultivar Development and Management Strategies for Sugarcane)
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Article
Prediction of Ratoon Sugarcane Family Yield and Selection Using Remote Imagery
Agronomy 2021, 11(7), 1273; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11071273 - 23 Jun 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 826
Abstract
Remote sensing techniques and the use of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) have simplified the estimation of yield and plant health in many crops. Family selection in sugarcane breeding programs relies on weighed plots at harvest, which is a labor-intensive process. In this study, [...] Read more.
Remote sensing techniques and the use of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) have simplified the estimation of yield and plant health in many crops. Family selection in sugarcane breeding programs relies on weighed plots at harvest, which is a labor-intensive process. In this study, we utilized UAS-based remote sensing imagery of plant-cane and first ratoon crops to estimate family yields for a second ratoon crop. Multiple families from the commercial breeding program were planted in a randomized complete block design by family. Standard red, green, and blue imagery was acquired with a commercially available UAS equipped with a Red–Green–Blue (RGB) camera. Color indices using the CIELab color space model were estimated from the imagery for each plot. The cane was mechanically harvested with a sugarcane combine harvester and plot weights were obtained (kg) with a field wagon equipped with load cells. Stepwise regression, correlations, and variance inflation factors were used to identify the best multiple linear regression model to estimate the second ratoon cane yield (kg). A multiple regression model, which included family, and five different color indices produced a significant R2 of 0.88. This indicates that it is possible to make family selection predictions of cane weight without collecting plot weights. The adoption of this technology has the potential to decrease labor requirements and increase breeding efficiency. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultivar Development and Management Strategies for Sugarcane)
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Review

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Review
UAVs to Monitor and Manage Sugarcane: Integrative Review
Agronomy 2022, 12(3), 661; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy12030661 - 09 Mar 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1005
Abstract
Pilotless aircraft systems will reshape our critical thinking about agriculture. Furthermore, because they can drive a transformative precision and digital farming, we authoritatively review the contemporary academic literature on UAVs from every angle imaginable for remote sensing and on-field management, particularly for sugarcane. [...] Read more.
Pilotless aircraft systems will reshape our critical thinking about agriculture. Furthermore, because they can drive a transformative precision and digital farming, we authoritatively review the contemporary academic literature on UAVs from every angle imaginable for remote sensing and on-field management, particularly for sugarcane. We focus our search on the period of 2016–2021 to refer to the broadest bibliometric collection, from the emergence of the term “UAV” in the typical literature on sugarcane to the latest year of complete publication. UAVs are capable of navigating throughout the field both autonomously and semi-autonomously at the control of an assistant operator. They prove useful to remotely capture the spatial-temporal variability with pinpoint accuracy. Thereby, they can enable the stakeholder to make early-stage decisions at the right time and place, whether for mapping, re-planting, or fertilizing areas producing feedstock for food and bioenergy. Most excitingly, they are flexible. Hence, we can strategically explore them to spray active ingredients and spread entomopathogenic bioagents (e.g., Cotesia flavipes and Thricrogramma spp.) onto the field wherever they need to be in order to suppress economically relevant pests (e.g., Diatraea saccharalis, Mahanarva fimbriolata, sugarcane mosaic virus, and weeds) more precisely and environmentally responsibly than what is possible with traditional approaches (without the need to heavily traffic and touch the object). Plainly, this means that insights into ramifications of our integrative review are timely. They will provide knowledge to progress the field’s prominence in operating flying machines to level up the cost-effectiveness of producing sugarcane towards solving the sector’s greatest challenges ahead, such as achieving food and energy security in order to thrive in an ever-challenging world. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultivar Development and Management Strategies for Sugarcane)
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